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James A Bell

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BUSINESS
March 14, 2005 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
As a kid in South Los Angeles, James A. Bell's ambition was to follow in his father's footsteps and deliver the mail. "When I was growing up, I didn't know what a CEO or CFO was," Bell recalled last week. "I thought people who worked at the post office were those we could look up to. They were the ones making the honest living, and that was something I thought I could do." He's doing something else. One week ago, the 56-year-old was named interim chief executive of Boeing Co.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1986 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
More than nine months after a wind-swept arson fire ripped through Baldwin Hills last July, the hillside community is still a long way from being rebuilt. A majority of the 48 homeowners whose houses were destroyed are still waiting. Some are waiting for insurance settlements, architectural plans or city permits to reconstruct their homes. Others are still waiting for the emotional trauma and memories to subside before they decide what to do. A few say they cannot return.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2005 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Boeing Co. said Monday that it dismissed President and Chief Executive Harry C. Stonecipher, who had come out of retirement to restore the company's tarnished reputation, after it learned he was having an extramarital affair with a female executive. The company's board demanded Stonecipher's resignation after concluding that his relationship with the executive represented poor judgment on his part and "would impair his ability to lead."
BUSINESS
March 8, 2005 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
It's not your everyday job listing. With the ouster of Boeing Co. Chief Executive Harry C. Stonecipher, the aerospace giant suddenly needs a captain who not only can run a $52-billion company, top defense contractor and major airplane manufacturer but also can burnish the company's scandal-tarnished image and lift the sagging morale among its 159,000 employees.
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