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James A Doolittle

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1995 | Lewis Segal, Lewis Segal is The Times' dance writer
Ten years ago, James A. Doolittle learned that he had cancer and only a 50% chance of survival. At that time, he could look back on four decades of producing opera, ballet, theater and pop music on local stages--and of turning the Greek Theatre, the Biltmore and the Huntington Hartford into thriving playhouses after each of them had floundered under previous management.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1997 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
The death of impresario James A. Doolittle at age 83, apparently of a heart attack over the weekend, came as a personal loss to those of us who grew up in Los Angeles during the years when he managed the Greek, the Biltmore and the Huntington Hartford theaters (the last renamed the Doolittle after he sold it in 1986). The companies he presented on those stages were, of course, tantalizing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The Peking Opera, whose works are not grand opera in the European tradition but a lively melange of dance, mime, acrobatics and martial arts, arrives at UCLA's Royce Hall Friday for a series of five performances and plays in Claremont tonight. The 60-person company and its 200-year-old tradition of very lively tale-telling, is being presented locally by James A. Doolittle and his Southern California Theatre Assn.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
James Arnold Doolittle, a Los Angeles dance impresario who brought names like Joffrey and Baryshnikov to local dance stages and ensured that a high-profile production of the "Nutcracker" ballet was presented here every Christmas, has died. He was 83. The soft-spoken producer of opera, theater and dance--not to mention a major career as head of the Greek Theatre--was found dead Saturday morning at his West Hollywood home.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1997 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
The death of impresario James A. Doolittle at age 83, apparently of a heart attack over the weekend, came as a personal loss to those of us who grew up in Los Angeles during the years when he managed the Greek, the Biltmore and the Huntington Hartford theaters (the last renamed the Doolittle after he sold it in 1986). The companies he presented on those stages were, of course, tantalizing.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
James Arnold Doolittle, a Los Angeles dance impresario who brought names like Joffrey and Baryshnikov to local dance stages and ensured that a high-profile production of the "Nutcracker" ballet was presented here every Christmas, has died. He was 83. The soft-spoken producer of opera, theater and dance--not to mention a major career as head of the Greek Theatre--was found dead Saturday morning at his West Hollywood home.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Davis Memorial: A memorial service for actor Brad Davis is set for Friday, 1 p.m., at the James A. Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood. Davis died last week after a secret six-year battle with AIDS.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2004
Renamed: The historic Hollywood building that was most recently known as the James A. Doolittle Theatre and, before that, as the Huntington Hartford, will be rechristened Saturday as the Ricardo Montalban Theatre. Renewed: Showtime has renewed its drama series "Queer as Folk" for a fifth season.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Ticket Bargain: The Aug. 22 matinee of the musical "Sarafina!" will be a "Pay What You Can" performance at the James A. Doolittle Theatre. On that day, patrons can purchase tickets at the box office at whatever price they can afford.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Out of Yonkers: Mercedes McCambridge and Brooke Adams will star as Grandma Kurnitz and daughter Bella, respectively, when Neil Simon's "Lost in Yonkers" comes to Los Angeles next summer. The roles were originated by Irene Worth and Mercedes Ruehl. The national company is due at the James A. Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood next July.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1995 | Lewis Segal, Lewis Segal is The Times' dance writer
Ten years ago, James A. Doolittle learned that he had cancer and only a 50% chance of survival. At that time, he could look back on four decades of producing opera, ballet, theater and pop music on local stages--and of turning the Greek Theatre, the Biltmore and the Huntington Hartford into thriving playhouses after each of them had floundered under previous management.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The Peking Opera, whose works are not grand opera in the European tradition but a lively melange of dance, mime, acrobatics and martial arts, arrives at UCLA's Royce Hall Friday for a series of five performances and plays in Claremont tonight. The 60-person company and its 200-year-old tradition of very lively tale-telling, is being presented locally by James A. Doolittle and his Southern California Theatre Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1989
"You never ever have to work for the camera's attention. It is totally obsessed with what you're going to do. Whereas you do have to spend a lot of energy simply licking an audience into shape." --Glenda Jackson, currently headlining with John Lithgow in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" at the James A. Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood, in Drama-Logue.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1985
What is happening to our Los Angeles theater (" 'Garden' Cultivates Vision of Hell," by Dan Sullivan, Oct. 11)? How we were looking forward to the refurbishing of the new James A. Doolittle theater, which is the nicest theater in town. It was so heartbreaking to have walked into the cheapest, most tasteless theater we have seen in years on the opening night of the most tasteless theater production we have seen in years--"The Garden of Earthly Delights." How could the new owners have misguessed the public's taste so badly?
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