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James A Doolittle Theater

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1991 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When South African playwright Mbongeni Ngema conceived "Sarafina!" in 1984, Nelson Mandela, new president of the anti-apartheid African National Congress, was serving a life prison sentence. By the time "Sarafina!" opened July 18 at the James A. Doolittle Theater in Hollywood, Mandela had been out of prison for more than a year. And, just a month before opening night, South African President Frederik W.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
An ambitious plan to convert the 1,021-seat Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood into a Latino-oriented performance center will be officially unveiled today. If the plan is realized, the theater would be operated by the recently formed Ricardo Montalban-Nosotros Foundation and may be renamed the Ricardo Montalban Theatre. "This has national implications," said Al Pin~a, an official for the National Council of La Raza, the Washington, D.C.
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BUSINESS
February 4, 1999 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Beverly Hills developer today will unveil designs for a $50-million Hollywood retail project that would also redevelop the venerable Doolittle Theatre as a center for locally based productions. Regent Properties, which has been working on plans for a retail complex at Sunset Boulevard and Vine Street for months, has secured its first tenants and will present designs for an Art Deco-style structure at a Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency hearing.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1999 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Beverly Hills developer today will unveil designs for a $50-million Hollywood retail project that would also redevelop the venerable Doolittle Theatre as a center for locally based productions. Regent Properties, which has been working on plans for a retail complex at Sunset Boulevard and Vine Street for months, has secured its first tenants and will present designs for an Art Deco-style structure at a Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency hearing.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1990 | JANICE ARKATOV
Public Rush made its debut at Tuesday's performance of "The Piano Lesson" at the Doolittle Theatre--and 45 theatergoers showed up to take advantage of the new policy. According to the plan, all remaining seats for performances (except Saturday nights) will go on sale 10 minutes before the 8 p.m. curtain. The price: $10 cash--as opposed to the regular $26-$36. "I would've come anyway, but this was a major incentive," said Kim Zucco.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1990 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
R evivals of Stephen Sondheim's "A Little Night Music," with Lee Remick , and Noel Coward's "The Vortex" will play the Doolittle Theatre next year, joining three previously reported shows--"Jerome Robbins' Broadway," "The Heidi Chronicles" and "Henceforward . . . "--to make up the Center Theatre Group's 1990-91 Ahmanson-at-the-Doolittle season.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
An ambitious plan to convert the 1,021-seat Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood into a Latino-oriented performance center will be officially unveiled today. If the plan is realized, the theater would be operated by the recently formed Ricardo Montalban-Nosotros Foundation and may be renamed the Ricardo Montalban Theatre. "This has national implications," said Al Pin~a, an official for the National Council of La Raza, the Washington, D.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1985
What is happening to our Los Angeles theater (" 'Garden' Cultivates Vision of Hell," by Dan Sullivan, Oct. 11)? How we were looking forward to the refurbishing of the new James A. Doolittle theater, which is the nicest theater in town. It was so heartbreaking to have walked into the cheapest, most tasteless theater we have seen in years on the opening night of the most tasteless theater production we have seen in years--"The Garden of Earthly Delights." How could the new owners have misguessed the public's taste so badly?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A Little Music for Nettleton: Lois Nettleton has been named to replace Lee Remick in Stephen Sondheim's "A Little Night Music." Remick bowed out of the production, set to open at the James A. Doolittle Theater on April 18, because she needed to devote time to intensive physical therapy. Nettleton, currently starring in the NBC series "In the Heat of the Night," has won two Emmys and a Tony Award.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1987
Actors Lucille Ball, Carol Channing, Bonnie Franklin, Albert Hague, Shirley Jones, Michelle Lee and Rita Moreno; producer Lawrence Kasha ("Knot's Landing") and conductor Peter Matz have joined the advisory board of Musical Comedy/L.A., UCLA's resident professional production company. The board, which is co-chaired by comedian Carol Burnett and Emmy-award winning director George Schaefer, oversees the company's goal of encouraging interest in musical comedy. Musical Comedy/L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1991 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When South African playwright Mbongeni Ngema conceived "Sarafina!" in 1984, Nelson Mandela, new president of the anti-apartheid African National Congress, was serving a life prison sentence. By the time "Sarafina!" opened July 18 at the James A. Doolittle Theater in Hollywood, Mandela had been out of prison for more than a year. And, just a month before opening night, South African President Frederik W.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1990 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
R evivals of Stephen Sondheim's "A Little Night Music," with Lee Remick , and Noel Coward's "The Vortex" will play the Doolittle Theatre next year, joining three previously reported shows--"Jerome Robbins' Broadway," "The Heidi Chronicles" and "Henceforward . . . "--to make up the Center Theatre Group's 1990-91 Ahmanson-at-the-Doolittle season.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1990 | JANICE ARKATOV
Public Rush made its debut at Tuesday's performance of "The Piano Lesson" at the Doolittle Theatre--and 45 theatergoers showed up to take advantage of the new policy. According to the plan, all remaining seats for performances (except Saturday nights) will go on sale 10 minutes before the 8 p.m. curtain. The price: $10 cash--as opposed to the regular $26-$36. "I would've come anyway, but this was a major incentive," said Kim Zucco.
NEWS
March 7, 1987
Bill Edwards, who had covered the Los Angeles theater scene longer than other currently active critics, died Thursday at Hollywood Community Hospital. The veteran reporter for Daily Variety was 57 and had a history of heart trouble. Edwards, whose tag line "Edwa" had appeared in Daily Variety for 20 years, had a particular interest in the development of Equity Waiver theaters, where new plays that often went on to greater successes were first seen before small audiences at reasonable prices.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1991
Regarding Saul Turteltaub's letter (Saturday Letters, Calendar, June 29): For 25 years I have been a subscription patron of Ahmanson Theatre productions. For the last two years I have been obliged to endure being shunted to center orchestra row H seats in the dreary UCLA James A. Doolittle Theater. Row spacing makes it necessary to swing one's legs into the adjacent seat space. Poor seat arrangement places a seat directly in front of me, and even at 6 feet 2 I find center stage view blocked.
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