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James A Lake

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NEWS
January 15, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
All life on Earth descended from sulfur-eating bacteria that lived 3.5 billion years ago in near-boiling water and emitted a stench like rotten eggs, according to a new analysis by a controversial UCLA molecular biologist. The bacteria, which were very similar to those that now proliferate around hot-water vents on the ocean floor, were not the first form of life to appear on Earth, James A. Lake reported in a paper in this week's Nature magazine.
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NEWS
October 26, 1995 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Powerbroker and Republican strategist James H. Lake pleaded guilty to wire fraud and election law violations Wednesday and pledged to "fully cooperate" with the independent counsel who is investigating former Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy's relationships with large agricultural businesses and their lobbyists.
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NEWS
January 30, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congressional hearings on trade legislation inevitably attract overflow audiences. With so much at stake, the lobbyists start lining up for seats as early as 6:30 a.m. for 10 o'clock sessions. "You have to get up this early if you want to get in at all," one resigned lobbyist says. But these days, much of the well-heeled audience is not there on behalf of U.S. corporations or organized labor, as once was the case. As often as not, their clients are likely to be Japanese.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congressional hearings on trade legislation inevitably attract overflow audiences. With so much at stake, the lobbyists start lining up for seats as early as 6:30 a.m. for 10 o'clock sessions. "You have to get up this early if you want to get in at all," one resigned lobbyist says. But these days, much of the well-heeled audience is not there on behalf of U.S. corporations or organized labor, as once was the case. As often as not, their clients are likely to be Japanese.
NEWS
October 26, 1995 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Powerbroker and Republican strategist James H. Lake pleaded guilty to wire fraud and election law violations Wednesday and pledged to "fully cooperate" with the independent counsel who is investigating former Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy's relationships with large agricultural businesses and their lobbyists.
NEWS
July 3, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A controversial UCLA molecular biologist has discovered new evidence supporting his long-held theory that all life on Earth descended from bizarre heat-loving, sulfur-eating bacteria that lived 3.5 billion years ago and emitted a stench like rotten eggs. Those organisms, close relatives of which survive in hot water vents on the ocean's floor and in geysers at Yellowstone National Park, are the closest living bacterial relatives of humans and other animals and plants, James A.
OPINION
April 5, 1992 | Kevin Phillips, Kevin Phillips, publisher of the American Political Report, is the author of "The Politics of Rich and Poor" (Random House)
As the Mother of All Dirty Campaigns gathers its facts and innuendo for November, probable Democratic nominee Bill Clinton is already so smeared and so ready to return fire that George Bush, in his clean white shirt of upright Republicanism and family values, can look forward to a savaging of his own. How much of this dirt sticks could be critically important. Political logic, press reports and recent Democratic mutterings all suggest the main fire will be directed against three targets.
NEWS
December 8, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Vermont, a child's chances of undergoing a tonsillectomy range from 8% to 70%, depending on where he or she lives. In Maine, more than half of the men in some towns have their prostates removed by age 80, while in a neighboring village the rate may be as low as 15%. Residents of New Haven, Conn., are twice as likely as those in Boston to have heart bypass surgery--but only half as likely to have their carotid arteries cleansed by a high-tech "Roto-Rooter"-like device.
NEWS
January 15, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
All life on Earth descended from sulfur-eating bacteria that lived 3.5 billion years ago in near-boiling water and emitted a stench like rotten eggs, according to a new analysis by a controversial UCLA molecular biologist. The bacteria, which were very similar to those that now proliferate around hot-water vents on the ocean floor, were not the first form of life to appear on Earth, James A. Lake reported in a paper in this week's Nature magazine.
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