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James A Mirrlees

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October 9, 1996 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scholars from Columbia and Cambridge universities, whose work has shed light on how government and private enterprise can maneuver in a world of incomplete information, were awarded the 1996 Nobel Memorial Prize in economics Tuesday. The prestigious $1.12-million award is shared by William S. Vickrey, 82, who is retired from Columbia University in New York, and James A. Mirrlees, 60, of Cambridge in Britain.
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NEWS
October 9, 1996 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scholars from Columbia and Cambridge universities, whose work has shed light on how government and private enterprise can maneuver in a world of incomplete information, were awarded the 1996 Nobel Memorial Prize in economics Tuesday. The prestigious $1.12-million award is shared by William S. Vickrey, 82, who is retired from Columbia University in New York, and James A. Mirrlees, 60, of Cambridge in Britain.
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MAGAZINE
December 2, 2001
In economics, "the winner's curse" describes the stampede mentality that can inflate values in heated bidding contests, so that a victorious bid is really a loss. But the phrase could also title an "Unsolved Mysteries" segment on the uncanny bad luck that seems to dog Nobel Prize winners in economics. From the case files: 1995: Thanks to a clause presciently inserted by his ex-wife into their divorce settlment nearly seven years before, University of Chicago economist Robert E. Lucas Jr.
NEWS
October 12, 1996 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three days after being awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in economics for his inspired and imaginative solutions to the problems of everyday life, William S. Vickrey died of an apparent heart attack Friday at age 82. Colleagues at Columbia University here, where Vickrey's career spanned 60 years, were stunned and saddened by his death, which came just as he was finally gaining a worldwide audience for his provocative views.
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