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James A Thomson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1989 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
James A. Thomson, a nuclear physicist and former staff member of the National Security Council, was named president and chief executive officer of the RAND Corp. on Thursday. Thomson, 44, had been serving as RAND's acting president and CEO since mid-May, when his predecessor, Donald B. Rice, left the private, nonprofit Santa Monica research center to become secretary of the Air Force.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1989 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
James A. Thomson, a nuclear physicist and former staff member of the National Security Council, was named president and chief executive officer of the RAND Corp. on Thursday. Thomson, 44, had been serving as RAND's acting president and CEO since mid-May, when his predecessor, Donald B. Rice, left the private, nonprofit Santa Monica research center to become secretary of the Air Force.
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NEWS
June 1, 1989
RAND Corp. Executive Vice President James A. Thomson has been named acting president of the Santa Monica research corporation, while a nationwide search for a permanent replacement is under way. Thomson is filling in for former RAND President Donald B. Rice, who was sworn in as Secretary of the Air Force in Washington this week. Thomson, 44, is a physicist and a former staff member of the National Security Council.
NEWS
August 10, 2001
"To support federal funding for embryonic stem cell research is to come down on the side of hope for the millions of Americans suffering from diseases ranging from Alzheimer's, to cancer, to Parkinson's, to diabetes." --Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle of South Dakota * "Our rabbinic authorities inform us that an isolated fertilized egg does not enjoy the full status of personhood and its attendant protections."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Abraham S. Becker, a Rand Corp. economist who advised the CIA on military spending in the former Soviet Union and was known for his thorough understanding of the complexities of the Soviet economy during the Cold War, died of leukemia July 5 in Los Angeles. He was 76. He was best known for his work suggesting that the Soviet Union's hefty military spending would lead to its eventual downfall.
NEWS
April 2, 1999 | From Associated Press
Researchers have isolated from adult bone marrow a master cell that can be directed to grow bone or cartilage, a laboratory feat that experts call a major step toward learning to make replacement parts for ailing or aged bodies. The researchers at Osiris Therapeutics in Baltimore report in the journal Science that they isolated a single cell, called a mesenchymal stem cell, and then grew it into a colony of more than a million cells that could be induced to produce bone, cartilage or fat.
NEWS
September 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
For the first time, researchers have used embryonic stem cells to produce human blood cells, a step that could lead to a new source of cells for transfusion and other therapies. Primitive human blood cells, known as hematopoietic precursor cells, were produced from human embryonic stem cells by researchers at the University of Wisconsin, led by James A. Thomson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1992 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who would have thought 10 years ago that RAND, a leading player in the Cold War game of mutually assured destruction, would one day announce a cooperative agreement with Moscow? Not Alexander N. Shokhin, Russia's deputy prime minister, who signed the document Friday at the think tank where planners once helped the Air Force work out tactics and strategy for nuclear war with the Soviet Union. "RAND was, in the Brezhnev era of stagnation, our enemy, the enemy of Soviet society," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2008 | Elaine Woo, Woo is a Times staff writer.
Gustave H. Shubert, who expanded the Rand Corp.'s research mission from military studies to analyses of education policy, crime-fighting and other domestic issues, died Nov. 25 of natural causes at a Los Angeles nursing home. He was 79. Shubert was associated with Rand for more than 40 years, beginning in 1959 when he joined the Santa Monica-based think tank to conduct research on national security matters, including American policy in Southeast Asia.
NEWS
February 10, 1993 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson on Tuesday named an all-star team of conservative intellectuals to his newly formed Council of Economic Advisers, including two Nobel Prize winners and four people who teach at Stanford University or are fellows at its free-market-oriented think tank, the Hoover Institution. The council, headed by former Secretary of State George P. Shultz, also includes the chairmen of two of California's biggest corporations--BankAmerica and Southern California Edison.
NEWS
November 6, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In a stunning first step toward producing donor tissue and organs for transplants on demand, two groups of researchers have grown human cells with the potential to become virtually any kind of body tissue. These "stem cells" are the parent cells from which all organs in the body are produced. The ability to grow them in large quantities in the laboratory opens the door to new treatments for a broad variety of diseases, including heart disease, cancer, diabetes and degenerative brain disorders.
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