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James Agee

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April 11, 2005 | From Associated Press
James Agee died two years before his novel, "A Death in the Family," was published in 1957. He never lived to see the book win the Pulitzer Prize in 1958. He never even approved its final form. Now Agee scholar Michael Lofaro says that "A Death in the Family" was pulled together by a misguided editor whose final version does not match Agee's intentions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2012 | By Noel Murray
The Expendables 2 Lionsgate, $29.95; Blu-ray, $39.99 Available on VOD beginning Nov. 20 Doubling down on what worked just fine two years ago, this sequel brings back Sylvester Stallone, Jason Statham, Jet Li, Dolph Lundgren, Bruce Willis and Arnold Schwarzenegger, and adds Chuck Norris and Jean-Claude Van Damme to the roster of action veterans paying homage to the big, dumb guns-and-bombs flicks of the 1980s. The plot this time has the team of mercenaries losing one of their own and exacting revenge, but "plot" isn't really the point of either of the "Expendables" movies; the idea is to show buff, beloved old stars, swapping quips and bullets while running in slow-motion ahead of explosions.
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BOOKS
March 23, 2008 | Nina Revoyr, Nina Revoyr's new novel, "The Age of Dreaming," will be published next month.
At the time of his death of a heart attack at 45, James Agee had published relatively little of his own creative work. Known more for his insightful movie reviews and film adaptations, Agee had produced a novella, a volume of poetry and "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men," a study of Alabama sharecroppers. He left behind the manuscript of a novel he'd been working on for more than a decade, which editor David McDowell published as "A Death in the Family."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2010 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In 1955, when "The Night of the Hunter" opened to mixed reviews and poor box office, the film was already a throwback: steeped in the luxuriant gloom of German Expressionism and the heightened poetics of D.W. Griffith (and set to boot in rural Depression-era America). But in reaching back to the primordial enchantment and promise of silent-era cinema, director Charles Laughton created something timeless ? "a nightmarish sort of Mother Goose tale," as he put it, but also an American Gothic variation on an Old Testament parable.
BOOKS
January 12, 1986 | Charles Champlin
Dead these 30 years of a headlong disregard for his own well-being, having continued to smoke and drink heavily even after the warnings of death were upon him, the poet-critic-novelist-journalist James Agee now has the near-legendary status of those who die young (he was only 46) after an incandescent passage. "Agee: A Life Remembered" does not aim to replace Laurence Bergreen's full-dress biography "James Agee, a Life" (Dutton, 1984).
NEWS
March 24, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Writer James Agee was only 45 when he died of a heart attack in 1955, but his legacy includes "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men," his classic 1941 collaboration with photographer Walker Evans on tenant farmers; "Permit Me Voyage," a tome of his poetry from 1934; and "The Morning Watch," his 1951 autobiographical novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2009 | Associated Press
The boyhood home of Pulitzer-winning author Cormac McCarthy, long abandoned and overgrown, has been destroyed by a fire even as preservationists tried in recent months to save it. "We have lost a literary landmark," Kim Trent, executive director of the nonprofit Knox Heritage group, said Wednesday, a day after the two-story wood-frame structure in Knoxville, Tenn., was reduced to a smoldering ruin. It was a blow for a city that also failed to save the early homes of Pulitzer-winning writer James Agee and poet Nikki Giovanni.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Just when we thought we'd reached saturation point with one-person shows, along comes "James Agee: A Heart's Eye," presented Sundays at the Mark Taper Forum's Literary Cabaret customary hangout, the Itchey Foot Ristorante.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2006
A week after being castigated for omitting the writers' credits from its annual "Sneaks" edition, Calendar in part atones by running David Kipen's "The Pen Is Mightier," [Feb. 5] billing itself as "a first step toward challenging auteurism with a powerful schreiberist countermyth." While I wholeheartedly applaud the author's wish to honor the screenwriter, Kipen's exemplary list, by starting off with James Agee, demonstrates the difficulty in pinning down exact credits. Kipen claims that a "robust anticlericalism" thematically unites the adaptations of "The African Queen" and "The Night of the Hunter," citing "Agee's choices, both of materials and accentuation."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2010 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In 1955, when "The Night of the Hunter" opened to mixed reviews and poor box office, the film was already a throwback: steeped in the luxuriant gloom of German Expressionism and the heightened poetics of D.W. Griffith (and set to boot in rural Depression-era America). But in reaching back to the primordial enchantment and promise of silent-era cinema, director Charles Laughton created something timeless ? "a nightmarish sort of Mother Goose tale," as he put it, but also an American Gothic variation on an Old Testament parable.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2009 | Associated Press
The boyhood home of Pulitzer-winning author Cormac McCarthy, long abandoned and overgrown, has been destroyed by a fire even as preservationists tried in recent months to save it. "We have lost a literary landmark," Kim Trent, executive director of the nonprofit Knox Heritage group, said Wednesday, a day after the two-story wood-frame structure in Knoxville, Tenn., was reduced to a smoldering ruin. It was a blow for a city that also failed to save the early homes of Pulitzer-winning writer James Agee and poet Nikki Giovanni.
BOOKS
March 23, 2008 | Nina Revoyr, Nina Revoyr's new novel, "The Age of Dreaming," will be published next month.
At the time of his death of a heart attack at 45, James Agee had published relatively little of his own creative work. Known more for his insightful movie reviews and film adaptations, Agee had produced a novella, a volume of poetry and "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men," a study of Alabama sharecroppers. He left behind the manuscript of a novel he'd been working on for more than a decade, which editor David McDowell published as "A Death in the Family."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2008 | Duncan Mansfield, Associated Press
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -- "A Death in the Family" won the Pulitzer Prize a half century ago and became an American literary classic, but it was not the book James Agee wrote. "It wasn't what Agee intended. At least, it isn't the manuscript that he left when he died," University of Tennessee professor Michael Lofaro says.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2006
A week after being castigated for omitting the writers' credits from its annual "Sneaks" edition, Calendar in part atones by running David Kipen's "The Pen Is Mightier," [Feb. 5] billing itself as "a first step toward challenging auteurism with a powerful schreiberist countermyth." While I wholeheartedly applaud the author's wish to honor the screenwriter, Kipen's exemplary list, by starting off with James Agee, demonstrates the difficulty in pinning down exact credits. Kipen claims that a "robust anticlericalism" thematically unites the adaptations of "The African Queen" and "The Night of the Hunter," citing "Agee's choices, both of materials and accentuation."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2006 | David Kipen, Special to The Times
TO enter a parallel universe, just dial (323) 782-4591. A blithe female voice speaks the titles of half a dozen or so current movies, the dates and times they will screen at a certain private auditorium in Beverly Hills and, finally, the names of the filmmakers responsible. The titles are largely familiar. The names, to any but the most uncommon cinephile, are not.
BOOKS
May 15, 2005 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel is the author of many books, including a forthcoming biography of Elia Kazan.
In the spring of 1947, Charles Chaplin brought "Monsieur Verdoux," his first film in seven years, to New York for its world premiere. Those years had not been kind to Chaplin; his predilection for much younger women, culminating in a spectacular paternity trial in 1944, together with his radically leftist politics, had alienated substantial portions of the press and public. "Verdoux" -- chilly, charmless and preachy, unlike anything he had ever made before -- would only widen this breach.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1998
In his April 19 feature "When War Was Hell," David Freeman describes three classic war pictures, one of which is "The Story of G.I. Joe." He says it is William Wellman's 1945 film based on Ernie Pyle's celebrated dispatches from the front. He states that critic James Agee said of the closing scene: "It seems to me a war poem as great and as beautiful as any of Whitman's." And he says that when he saw a 16-millimeter print, he was shaken and wept and that he found the projectionist also in tears.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2008 | Duncan Mansfield, Associated Press
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -- "A Death in the Family" won the Pulitzer Prize a half century ago and became an American literary classic, but it was not the book James Agee wrote. "It wasn't what Agee intended. At least, it isn't the manuscript that he left when he died," University of Tennessee professor Michael Lofaro says.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2005 | From Associated Press
James Agee died two years before his novel, "A Death in the Family," was published in 1957. He never lived to see the book win the Pulitzer Prize in 1958. He never even approved its final form. Now Agee scholar Michael Lofaro says that "A Death in the Family" was pulled together by a misguided editor whose final version does not match Agee's intentions.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2002 | Robert Towne, Special to The Times
What sets a great screenwriter on his path? Picking up a lifetime achievement award from the writer's organization PEN West last month, Robert Towne ("Chinatown," "Shampoo," "Mission: Impossible") thought back to his beginnings. Here is an excerpt from his remarks. I grew up in a time when Los Angeles and screenwriting were viewed along similar lines -- the best thing about L.A.
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