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James Albaugh

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BUSINESS
August 28, 2004 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
Federal investigators reportedly have widened a probe of illegal hiring activities at Boeing Co. to include James Albaugh, head of the aerospace giant's defense unit, to see whether he was involved in the hiring of an Air Force contract administrator who was overseeing billions of dollars of contracts with the company.
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BUSINESS
February 23, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Boeing Co. has discovered a flaw in fuselage sections that may affect 55 of its new 787 Dreamliner jets and slow some deliveries, James Albaugh, Boeing's chief executive for commercial airplanes, said Wednesday. The Dreamliner is an all-new commercial jet that is largely made of lightweight carbon composites rather than sheets of aluminum. The plane made its first passenger flight with All Nippon Airways in October, but it was more than three years late because of design problems and supplier issues.
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BUSINESS
February 22, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
Boeing Co. has discovered a flaw in fuselage sections that may affect 55 of its new 787 Dreamliner jets and slow some deliveries, James Albaugh , Boeing's chief executive officer of commercial airplanes, said Wednesday. The Dreamliner is an all-new commercial jet that is largely made of lightweight carbon composites rather than sheets of aluminum. The plane made its first passenger flight with All Nippon Airways in October , but it was more than three years late because of design problems and supplier issues.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
Boeing Co. has discovered a flaw in fuselage sections that may affect 55 of its new 787 Dreamliner jets and slow some deliveries, James Albaugh , Boeing's chief executive officer of commercial airplanes, said Wednesday. The Dreamliner is an all-new commercial jet that is largely made of lightweight carbon composites rather than sheets of aluminum. The plane made its first passenger flight with All Nippon Airways in October , but it was more than three years late because of design problems and supplier issues.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Boeing Co. has discovered a flaw in fuselage sections that may affect 55 of its new 787 Dreamliner jets and slow some deliveries, James Albaugh, Boeing's chief executive for commercial airplanes, said Wednesday. The Dreamliner is an all-new commercial jet that is largely made of lightweight carbon composites rather than sheets of aluminum. The plane made its first passenger flight with All Nippon Airways in October, but it was more than three years late because of design problems and supplier issues.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1998 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aerospace industry veteran John A. McLuckey, who began his 39-year career as a clerk and became president of Boeing Co's. $4-billion-a-year Space Systems division, said Thursday that he will retire April 1. He will be succeeded by James F. Albaugh, president of the Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power unit of Boeing Space Systems. Both men are former Rockwell International Corp.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Boeing Co. gave pay raises last year to Alan Mulally and James Albaugh, who might be contenders to replace ousted Chief Executive Harry C. Stonecipher. Mulally, 59, head of Boeing's commercial-plane unit, had his salary and bonus boosted 7% to $1.29 million. Albaugh, 54, who leads the company's military division, got a 42% increase to $1.37 million, Boeing said in a government filing.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Boeing Co. predicted Thursday that the Air Force would order as many as 14 more C-17 transport jets, extending the plane's production. Boeing is funding parts purchases at its own expense in anticipation that the Air Force will add more C-17s to its 190-plane order. The Chicago-based company has delivered 170 aircraft already and may shut down production in Long Beach if additional orders don't come in.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1990
James F. Albaugh has been named a vice president of Rockwell International Corp.'s defense electronics business in Anaheim. Albaugh, formerly director of quality assurance, will head the newly consolidated quality assurance and logistics unit in Anaheim. He joined Rockwell in 1975 as a project engineer and became director of safety and quality assurance at the company's operations in Hanford, Wash. Albaugh was also plant manager of the company's operations in El Paso.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2004 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
Federal investigators reportedly have widened a probe of illegal hiring activities at Boeing Co. to include James Albaugh, head of the aerospace giant's defense unit, to see whether he was involved in the hiring of an Air Force contract administrator who was overseeing billions of dollars of contracts with the company.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1998 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aerospace industry veteran John A. McLuckey, who began his 39-year career as a clerk and became president of Boeing Co's. $4-billion-a-year Space Systems division, said Thursday that he will retire April 1. He will be succeeded by James F. Albaugh, president of the Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power unit of Boeing Space Systems. Both men are former Rockwell International Corp.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1998
John A. McLuckey, who began his 39-year career as a clerk and rose to become president of Boeing Co's. Space Systems division, said he will retire on April 1. He will be succeeded by James F. Albaugh, president of the Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power unit of the $4-billion-a-year Space Systems division. Both men are former Rockwell International Corp. executives who came to Boeing when the Seattle-based company acquired Rockwell's space and defense operations in December 1996.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2003 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Boeing Co., battered by a sharp downturn in the demand for commercial satellites and rockets, said Tuesday that it is making several administrative changes to its space operations in Southern California. The changes, mainly organizational, won't reduce the company's workforce in the region or entail any facility moves, Boeing executives said. They follow Boeing's announcement last week that it would take a $1.
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