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James B Busey

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
A Senate committee approved Tuesday the nominations of Adm. James B. Busey to head the Federal Aviation Administration and Rear Adm. Richard H. Truly to head the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Both nominations approved by the Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee now go to the full Senate.
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NEWS
February 10, 1991
Controllers on duty during the Feb. 1 air disaster at Los Angeles International Airport refused to meet with Federal Aviation Administration Administrator James B. Busey when he flew in from Washington to offer his support and build morale, federal officials confirmed Saturday. Busey, however, did meet with other air traffic controllers during his two-day stay, according to FAA Washington spokesman Bob Buckhorn. "The purpose of the (Feb. 4) trip . . .
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NEWS
February 10, 1991
Controllers on duty during the Feb. 1 air disaster at Los Angeles International Airport refused to meet with Federal Aviation Administration Administrator James B. Busey when he flew in from Washington to offer his support and build morale, federal officials confirmed Saturday. Busey, however, did meet with other air traffic controllers during his two-day stay, according to FAA Washington spokesman Bob Buckhorn. "The purpose of the (Feb. 4) trip . . .
NEWS
August 11, 1989 | LORI SILVER, Times Staff Writer
Federal Aviation Administration chief James B. Busey declared DC-10 jetliners safe Thursday, despite an incident the day before in which an engine aboard a Northwest Airlines DC-10 broke apart, forcing the plane to make an emergency landing in Denver. "We know of no hard facts at this time that would lead us to take any kind of action to ground the DC-10," Busey told reporters. "It's safe to fly. I would fly in the aircraft today."
NEWS
August 11, 1989 | LORI SILVER, Times Staff Writer
Federal Aviation Administration chief James B. Busey declared DC-10 jetliners safe Thursday, despite an incident the day before in which an engine aboard a Northwest Airlines DC-10 broke apart, forcing the plane to make an emergency landing in Denver. "We know of no hard facts at this time that would lead us to take any kind of action to ground the DC-10," Busey told reporters. "It's safe to fly. I would fly in the aircraft today."
NEWS
April 1, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Bush named Thomas C. Richards, retired four-star Air Force general, to run the Federal Aviation Administration. The appointment filled a job that was vacant for months. An earlier nominee, Jerry R. Curry, head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, asked a week ago that his name be withdrawn. Curry will be offered another government post, Bush Administration sources said. Curry "continues as a valued member of the President's team," Transportation Secretary Andrew H.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Federal Aviation Administration will start waiving penalties for air carriers that find, report and fix safety problems, FAA Administrator James B. Busey said. It is a major shift of enforcement policy. Busey said the FAA wants airlines to stop contesting punitive enforcement actions and concentrate on safer operations. Busey also detailed a proposed new FAA crackdown on pilots who drink that might even suspend flying licenses for motor vehicle infractions involving alcohol or drugs.
NEWS
July 12, 1989
Transportation Secretary Samuel K. Skinner swore in James B. Busey as the new administrator of the 50,000-employee Federal Aviation Administration. Busey, the former commander of U.S. Navy forces in Europe, succeeds T. Allan McArtor, who resigned as FAA administrator in February. The FAA oversees nonmilitary aviation and includes air traffic control operations that monitor and guide aircraft through U.S. skies. It also is responsible for the safety of all types of aircraft.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The Federal Aviation Administration today ordered a detailed inspection in the fan disks of all DC-10 engines similar to the one investigators believe failed before this summer's Iowa crash landing that killed 112 people. FAA Administrator James B. Busey announced the formal inspections before a congressional panel, where he and National Transportation Safety Board Chairman James Kolstad both declared the DC-10 jumbo jet safe.
NEWS
June 15, 1990 | From United Press International
Transportation Secretary Samuel K. Skinner announced a series of actions Thursday aimed at enhancing travel security against terrorism, including the creation of an Office of Intelligence and Security. Skinner also called for airlines to use more-sensitive X-ray machines and to match all checked luggage to passengers on international flights. The actions stem in part from recommendations made by the presidential Commission on Aviation Security and Terrorism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
A Senate committee approved Tuesday the nominations of Adm. James B. Busey to head the Federal Aviation Administration and Rear Adm. Richard H. Truly to head the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Both nominations approved by the Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee now go to the full Senate.
NEWS
July 27, 1990
The Federal Aviation Administration adopted a rule Thursday designed to ground pilots who violate drunken driving laws or are convicted of traffic offenses involving drugs. "This kind of behavior indicates an attitude that we believe is not compatible with safe flying," FAA Administrator James B. Busey said.
NEWS
May 28, 1990 | From The Washington Post
Transportation Secretary Samuel K. Skinner said he likely will shift direct control of aviation security and intelligence matters from the Federal Aviation Administration to his office, a major recommendation of the commission that investigated the terrorist bombing of Pan American Flight 103 in December, 1988.
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