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James B Dimas

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NEWS
April 25, 1993 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Commerce councilman who was passed over for mayor last week because he lives in South Gate is downplaying the importance of the ceremonial post. "The mayorship is nothing but a title," said former Mayor Pro Tem James B. Dimas Sr. "It still takes three votes to get anything done on the City Council."
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NEWS
April 25, 1993 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Commerce councilman who was passed over for mayor last week because he lives in South Gate is downplaying the importance of the ceremonial post. "The mayorship is nothing but a title," said former Mayor Pro Tem James B. Dimas Sr. "It still takes three votes to get anything done on the City Council."
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NEWS
April 4, 1985
Councilman James B. Dimas, 43, has been named mayor by the City Council. Dimas, who was elected in 1974, also was mayor from 1975 to 1976. In its annual reorganization, the five-member council also voted Robert Cornejo mayor pro tem at its meeting Monday. Cornejo, 50, was elected in 1984.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1993 | DUKE HELFAND
Former Commerce Mayor Pro Tem James B. Dimas Sr. has been locked out of his home in a conflict with his son and the domestic dispute appears to have cost him the mayor's seat. Because of the dispute, Dimas says he has been living outside the city. "There was a concern that the council would have been criticized by residents if he was elected mayor," said Mayor Ruth Aldaco, who was named to the city's top post Tuesday. "You elect a resident to be on the City Council."
NEWS
April 9, 1987
Councilman Michael V. Guerra was chosen mayor and Councilwoman Ruth R. Aldaco was voted mayor pro tem in an annual reorganization unanimously approved by the Commerce City Council Monday night. Guerra, a retired chiropractor, replaces Councilman James B. Dimas, a sheriff's deputy who was mayor for two years. The mayor presides over twice-monthly council meetings and is the ceremonial head of city government. First elected to the City Council in 1972, Guerra has served several times as mayor.
NEWS
April 23, 1987
The Commerce City Council has unanimously approved an ordinance that limits to $500 contributions from an individual donor to a council candidate. The ordinance, which takes effect 30 days after its formal adoption on May 4, is a modified version of a measure proposed by Councilwoman Ruth R. Aldaco in February. That proposal, which also would have limited a candidate's campaign spending to $10,000 per election, was defeated for lack of a second. City Atty.
NEWS
May 8, 1986
More mayors have been chosen in area cities following last month's elections: Montebello: Councilman William M. Molinari has been appointed by his colleagues to serve as mayor for the next year. Molinari, an electrical contractor first elected to the council in 1982, succeeds Councilman Art Payan. At the same time, Councilman Arnold M. Glasman, an attorney elected for the first time last fall, was chosen to succeed Molinari as mayor pro tem. Commerce: James B. Dimas Sr.
NEWS
May 21, 1992
Numerous city councils in the Southeast and Long Beach areas have selected new mayors and mayors pro tem in their annual reorganizations. The selections are approved by a majority of council members. The mayor's position is largely ceremonial in most cities, although the mayor presides over City Council meetings. The mayor pro tem assumes the duties of mayor when the mayor is absent or out of the city. City Mayor Mayor Pro Tem Artesia Mary Alyce Soares James Van Horn Bell Jay B.
NEWS
November 20, 1986
The City Council has approved an agreement to pay up to $2.8 million if the Commerce Refuse to Energy Authority defaults on a future loan from Southern California Edison Co., a spokesman said. The Refuse to Energy Authority administers the $50-million refuse-to-energy plant that is scheduled to begin commercial operation in June. Edison will be the sole buyer of energy from the plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1987 | MARK GLADSTONE and JERRY GILLAM, Times Staff Writers
Larry Gonzalez, who lost to Assemblywoman Gloria Molina in the new 1st District Los Angeles City Council race Tuesday, is trying to drum up support to run for her Eastside Assembly seat. A Los Angeles school board member, Gonzalez is one of five potential Democratic candidates scrambling for support even before Molina, a Democrat, has resigned her 56th Assembly District office. The only officially announced candidate so far is City of Commerce Mayor James B. Dimas.
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