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James B Patterson

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2004 | From Associated Press
James Patterson, writer of bestselling mystery novels, including the Alex Cross series, is tackling a new audience: the preschool set. In November, Little, Brown will publish "SantaKid," Patterson's first children's picture book. Michael Garland is the illustrator. The tale of Chrissie, Santa Claus' little girl, was largely written while Patterson watched his young son, Jack, in the playroom of the their Florida home, according to the publisher.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2004 | From Associated Press
James Patterson, writer of bestselling mystery novels, including the Alex Cross series, is tackling a new audience: the preschool set. In November, Little, Brown will publish "SantaKid," Patterson's first children's picture book. Michael Garland is the illustrator. The tale of Chrissie, Santa Claus' little girl, was largely written while Patterson watched his young son, Jack, in the playroom of the their Florida home, according to the publisher.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1990 | Daniel Cerone
If producer David Brown can get "The Midnight Club" going, co-producer Sylvester Stallone will star as New York's best detective--in a wheelchair. "The movie will have state-of-the-art, wheelchair, hand-to-hand combat," Brown tells us. "It's about a New York police detective determined to extinguish a crime overlord. . . . In his single-minded desire to wipe out this man, the detective is paralyzed from the waist down and almost killed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1989 | Associated Press
It used to be that age had a lot to do with how we act and what we buy. Now, stage could become important in how products are pitched to us, according to J. Walter Thompson, the ad agency that bills $3.8 billion annually worldwide. When they talk about stages, they aren't talking about second childhoods or mid-life crises. They're talking about say, a young parent, married and whose oldest child is preteen. That young parent could be 25 years old or 50.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1989 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
James B. Patterson is president of J. Walter Thompson USA, an advertising giant with $1.6 billion a year in billings. He calls himself "a late bloomer." But he's an early riser. The reason: At 5:30 a.m. most weekdays, he starts the day by working on a mystery novel. He types until 7 a.m., then departs his Manhattan penthouse for the hurly-burly of big-league advertising. The novel business has been good for him--he's had five published. The latest, "The Midnight Club," was optioned in December by film producer David Brown, whose dossier includes "Jaws" and "Cocoon."
BUSINESS
May 5, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
The recent rash of bad news at New York-based ad agency William Esty Co. has hit hard on the West Coast: The firm said Monday that it plans to close its 50-person Los Angeles office. This followed word late last week from Nissan that it had fired Esty, which has handled the auto maker's advertising for a decade and created the phrase, "We Are Driven." "It's safe to say that our need for the Los Angeles office is no longer there," said Joseph W. O'Donnell, Esty's chairman of just one month.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1992 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
A worried factory foreman trudges into the big boss's office. "Are the rumors true?" he demands. "That our plant's closing? That we're leaving California because of our pollution or something . . . and the layoffs?" The boss takes a long pause, then says, "No." A greatly relieved foreman smiles and leaves the office. This rankles another executive who overhears--and knows the score. "Why not just tell him the truth?" he presses.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
It takes a lot to get Phil Dusenberry excited about a TV commercial. After all, the New York ad agency chief probably sees more commercials than Dodger slugger Kirk Gibson sees curve balls. But one recent evening, while Dusenberry was home with his wife watching television, a commercial suddenly had both of them vying to be the first to blurt out what the ad was about. The rather simple commercial features an orchestra conductor who walks into a room, stands on his head, and begins conducting the orchestra with his feet.
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