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James B Stockdale

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October 13, 1992 | PAUL RICHTER and SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It may be only a sideshow in the 1992 campaign, but to three running mates, today's vice presidential debate in Atlanta is an assignment they cannot afford to botch. With one eye on the 1996 presidential race, Vice President Dan Quayle must try to wound the Democratic nominees while avoiding a misstep that would reinforce his image as a bumbler. Democratic Sen.
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NEWS
August 17, 1994 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A large American flag flies from his porch. The "Perot for President" bumper sticker on his car is still shiny. And retired Adm. James B. Stockdale believes he could do a better job than President Clinton. But the 70-year-old Vietnam War hero--Ross Perot's 1992 running mate--doesn't spend much time these days contemplating what life would be like if he had been elected vice president.
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NEWS
March 31, 1992 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Texas billionaire H. Ross Perot on Monday named retired Vice Adm. James B. Stockdale, a former Navy combat pilot and decorated Vietnam War hero, as his temporary running mate in a possible independent bid for the White House. The move clears the way for volunteers to mount petition drives on Perot's behalf to get him on the ballot; 27 states, including California, require independent candidates to name running mates on their ballot petitions.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retired Adm. James Stockdale, who ran for vice president last year as Ross Perot's running mate, will return to Vietnam in January for the first time since he was released from a Hanoi prison 20 years ago. The 69-year-old war hero, who as a captain and the highest-ranking Navy prisoner of war was repeatedly tortured, will go to Vietnam this time with his wife, Sybil, and give lectures aboard a cruise ship on a trip sponsored by Stanford University.
NEWS
October 24, 1992 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why, in the middle of a nationally televised debate with the White House at stake, would retired Vice Adm. James B. Stockdale have turned down his hearing aid? Well, as it turns out, he didn't mean to, Ross Perot's vice presidential candidate now says. His problem was that he had only begun wearing a hearing aid a couple weeks before the debate and was unfamiliar with the controls, Stockdale explained in an interview with The Times. "I'm still, you know, adjusting.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who won the vice presidential debate Tuesday, or at least helped their side in the race for President? The answer depends on which media you rely on, as well as what criteria you care about. The debate was a draw on ABC, a victory for Democrat Al Gore on NBC. Both their commentators and their instant polls said so. But as the media sorted through the claims that the candidates made during the debate, Vice President Dan Quayle took a beating.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A large American flag flies from his porch. The "Perot for President" bumper sticker on his car is still shiny. And retired Adm. James B. Stockdale believes he could do a better job than President Clinton. But the 70-year-old Vietnam War hero--Ross Perot's 1992 running mate--doesn't spend much time these days contemplating what life would be like if he had been elected vice president.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cancel the two remaining presidential debates now. Bring back these vice presidential guys and serve popcorn. This was fun. Sunday's rigidly formatted presidential debate, with President Bush, Bill Clinton and Ross Perot appearing to be separated by invisible walls while answering questions from a panel of journalists, was pretty much of a stiff. But what a difference two days made.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Democratic and Republican boosters said they were pleased with how their respective candidates fared in Tuesday's freewheeling, vice presidential candidate debate. But supporters of the Clinton-Gore ticket said the debate will change few voters' minds. "I don't think anybody won," said Kathy Burdick, 46, a Huntington Beach resident. Meanwhile, some Bush-Quayle loyalists suggested that the debate had improved that ticket's chances.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of the voters with the stamina and the stomach to watch Tuesday night's vice presidential debate reacted as if they were subjected to a civics lesson of the sausage-making variety. It wasn't pretty. The arguments and counter-arguments changed few minds and few votes among three dozen citizens around the country who were interviewed by The Times after they viewed the debate.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retired Vice Adm. James Stockdale, the nation's highest-ranking prisoner of war in Vietnam, told a Senate committee Thursday that POWs kept such careful track of one another that he doubts any could have been secretly kept behind at the end of the war.
NEWS
October 24, 1992 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why, in the middle of a nationally televised debate with the White House at stake, would retired Vice Adm. James B. Stockdale have turned down his hearing aid? Well, as it turns out, he didn't mean to, Ross Perot's vice presidential candidate now says. His problem was that he had only begun wearing a hearing aid a couple weeks before the debate and was unfamiliar with the controls, Stockdale explained in an interview with The Times. "I'm still, you know, adjusting.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who won the vice presidential debate Tuesday, or at least helped their side in the race for President? The answer depends on which media you rely on, as well as what criteria you care about. The debate was a draw on ABC, a victory for Democrat Al Gore on NBC. Both their commentators and their instant polls said so. But as the media sorted through the claims that the candidates made during the debate, Vice President Dan Quayle took a beating.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of the voters with the stamina and the stomach to watch Tuesday night's vice presidential debate reacted as if they were subjected to a civics lesson of the sausage-making variety. It wasn't pretty. The arguments and counter-arguments changed few minds and few votes among three dozen citizens around the country who were interviewed by The Times after they viewed the debate.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | JOHN M. BRODER and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
There they went again. The furious pace of Tuesday's vice presidential debate left a welter of unanswered questions and unsubstantiated charges hanging in the rhetoric-sodden air of the Georgia Tech auditorium. Sen. Al Gore of Tennessee accused the Bush Administration of subsidizing the export of American jobs. Vice President Dan Quayle charged Gore with advocating the spending of $100 billion of American taxpayer money to fund environmental cleanup overseas. Retired Vice Adm. James B.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cancel the two remaining presidential debates now. Bring back these vice presidential guys and serve popcorn. This was fun. Sunday's rigidly formatted presidential debate, with President Bush, Bill Clinton and Ross Perot appearing to be separated by invisible walls while answering questions from a panel of journalists, was pretty much of a stiff. But what a difference two days made.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The vice presidential candidates Tuesday night produced a more bruising, bare-knuckled fight over issues than their running mates--but probably left unchanged the basic dynamic of the presidential race. After an opening presidential debate Sunday night that offered few specifics--and even fewer sparks--Vice President Dan Quayle and Sen. Al Gore of Tennessee managed plenty of both Tuesday.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | PAUL RICHTER and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gore was "snotty" and "condescending." Quayle was "sarcastic," and hit "below the belt." Such acrimony was the byword at Tuesday night's vice presidential debate, and the rancor didn't end at the edge of the blood-red stage. Behind the scenes, the three-way debate among Sen. Al Gore, Vice President Dan Quayle and retired Vice Adm. James B. Stockdale clearly was more of a grudge match between Gore and Quayle.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | CATHLEEN DECKER and SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a debate that was by turns aggressive, interruptive and taunting, Vice President Dan Quayle and Tennessee Sen. Al Gore clashed heatedly Tuesday night, struggling over which of their political philosophies could salvage a troubled economy and colliding most fiercely over the character of their running mates. Their exchanges in the 90-minute meeting--the only one for the vice presidential candidates in the course of this year's campaign--overshadowed the third man on stage, James B.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | From Associated Press
Following are excerpts from Tuesday night's vice presidential debate in Atlanta: Opening Statements Al Gore: Mr. Vice President, Dan, if I may . . . I'll make you a deal this evening--if you don't try to compare George Bush to Harry Truman, I won't compare you to Jack Kennedy. . . . Harry Truman, it's worth remembering, assumed the presidency when Franklin Roosevelt died here in Georgia. Only one of many occasions when fate thrust a vice president into the Oval Office in a time of crisis.
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