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James Bacque

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NEWS
May 3, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We never saw the Red Cross. Nobody came to inspect us until two years later, to bring us blankets. That was the first time they came, in 1947. We were eating the grass between the buildings. . . . But for the date, the description could be that of a Nazi death camp survivor, liberated by Allied troops at the end of World War II. In fact, the words are those of "Pvt. Heinz T.," a former Wehrmacht soldier rounded up by U.S.
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NEWS
May 3, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We never saw the Red Cross. Nobody came to inspect us until two years later, to bring us blankets. That was the first time they came, in 1947. We were eating the grass between the buildings. . . . But for the date, the description could be that of a Nazi death camp survivor, liberated by Allied troops at the end of World War II. In fact, the words are those of "Pvt. Heinz T.," a former Wehrmacht soldier rounded up by U.S.
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BOOKS
August 4, 1991 | Karen Stabiner
OTHER LOSSES by James Bacque (Prima Publishing: $22.95; 296 pp.). Traditionally, the winners in war get to define the history of the conflict. This was certainly true after World War II; if there were questions raised about some behavior on the part of the Allied forces (the bombing of Dresden, the use of the atom bomb), they have been downplayed when placed next to the atrocities of Nazi Germany. Author Bacque claims that the Allies, specifically Gen.
BOOKS
May 13, 1990
Re "The Allied War Crimes," May 3: A Canadian novelist named James Bacque charges that the United States Army permitted almost 1 million German prisoners to die from deliberate neglect. This happened, Bacque states in his recently published book, "Other Losses," despite the fact that there were supplies on hand to save them. He points the finger at the Supreme Allied Commander, Gen. Dwight D.
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