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James Blake Miller

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November 11, 2007 | Luis Sinco :, times staff photographer
The young marine lighted a cigarette and let it dangle. White smoke wafted around his helmet. His face was smeared with war paint. Blood trickled from his right ear and the bridge of his nose. Momentarily deafened by cannon blasts, he didn't know the shooting had stopped. He stared at the sunrise. His expression caught my eye. To me, it said: terrified, exhausted and glad just to be alive. I recognized that look because that's how I felt too. I raised my camera and snapped a few shots.
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NATIONAL
November 11, 2007 | Luis Sinco :, times staff photographer
The young marine lighted a cigarette and let it dangle. White smoke wafted around his helmet. His face was smeared with war paint. Blood trickled from his right ear and the bridge of his nose. Momentarily deafened by cannon blasts, he didn't know the shooting had stopped. He stared at the sunrise. His expression caught my eye. To me, it said: terrified, exhausted and glad just to be alive. I recognized that look because that's how I felt too. I raised my camera and snapped a few shots.
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NATIONAL
November 13, 2004 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The Marlboro man is angry: He has a war to fight and he's running out of smokes. "If you want to write something," he tells an intruding reporter, "tell Marlboro I'm down to four packs and I'm here in Fallouja till who knows when. Maybe they can send some. And they can bring down the price a bit. " Such are the unvarnished sentiments of Marine Lance Cpl. James Blake Miller, 20, a country boy from Kentucky who has been thrust unwittingly and somewhat unwillingly into the role of poster boy for a war on the other side of the world from his home on the farm.
NATIONAL
November 13, 2004 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The Marlboro man is angry: He has a war to fight and he's running out of smokes. "If you want to write something," he tells an intruding reporter, "tell Marlboro I'm down to four packs and I'm here in Fallouja till who knows when. Maybe they can send some. And they can bring down the price a bit. " Such are the unvarnished sentiments of Marine Lance Cpl. James Blake Miller, 20, a country boy from Kentucky who has been thrust unwittingly and somewhat unwillingly into the role of poster boy for a war on the other side of the world from his home on the farm.
NATIONAL
June 27, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The Marine dubbed the "Marlboro Man" after appearing in an iconic photograph from the Iraq war has filed for divorce weeks after dozens of Americans helped pay for a second, dream wedding for him and his wife. Millions became intrigued with James Blake Miller, 21, after seeing the 2004 Los Angeles Times photo of the lance corporal taking a break from combat. Miller and his wife, Jessica Holbrook, married at a county building in June 2005.
OPINION
November 21, 2004 | Bob Sipchen
Photographer Phil Stern, 85, is the legendary "Chronicler of Cool." His iconic black-and-white images include actor James Dean (coolly smoking), actor John Wayne (coolly smoking), drummer Shelly Manne (coolly smoking) and the Sinatra Rat Pack (coolly smoking). Before earning his reputation shooting Hollywood and the jazz scene, Stern fought in World War II. He photographed plenty of young warriors. They too were often captured smoking.
OPINION
November 14, 2007
Re "The Marlboro Marine," two-part series, Nov 11-12 I commend Times photographer Luis Sinco for his sensitive telling of the tragedy of Marine Lance Cpl. James Blake Miller, one of many tragedies that have yet to be told about those inflicted with the invisible wounds of warfare. So much of what Sinco says about Miller needs to be understood by those in government, especially those rattling sabers now.
OPINION
November 17, 2007 | MEGHAN DAUM
Readers of this newspaper were mesmerized this week by staff photographer Luis Sinco's two-part series about Lance Cpl. James Blake Miller, the man behind his now famous portrait, "Marlboro Marine." Taken in 2004 during the battle of Fallouja, the photograph shows a weary Marine staring into the morning sun. His face is smeared with mud, the bridge of his nose is bloodied, and a cigarette dangles from his lips with a Bogart-style insouciance we rarely see anymore.
NATIONAL
May 19, 2006 | David Zucchino, Times Staff Writer
Growing up in Jonancy Bottom, where coal trucks grind their gears as they rumble down from the ragged green hills, Blake Miller always believed there were only two paths for him: the coal mines or the Marine Corps. He chose the Marines, enlisting right out of high school. The Marines sent him to Iraq, and then to Fallouja, where his life was forever altered. He survived a harrowing all-night firefight in November 2004, pinned down on a rooftop by insurgents firing from a nearby house.
NATIONAL
November 12, 2007 | By Luis Sinco : Times Staff Photographer
James Blake Miller was in a world of pain, and I figured I should be by his side. A veterans' treatment program in West Haven, Conn. -- arguably the best in the nation -- offered hope. Moe Armstrong, a pioneer in vet-to-vet counseling, had heard of the Marlboro Marine's troubles and sent him feelers about coming for a visit. Despite my reservations about getting too involved, I had flown from Los Angeles to Kentucky to help Miller grab this lifeline. I coaxed him into my rental car and we headed north.
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