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NEWS
March 13, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
James Brooks, one of the last of the original abstract expressionist painters and known for improvisations in which he would turn his canvases to different positions as he was painting, is dead. His wife, Charlotte Park Brooks, said her husband was 85 when he died Monday at Brookhaven Memorial Hospital on Long Island in New York. She said he had been fighting Alzheimer's disease since 1985.
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SPORTS
August 30, 2013 | By Steve Galluzzo
Ashtin Johnson caught a one-yard touchdown pass from Josh Love and James Brooks ran for the two-point conversion to push host Long Beach Poly ahead of Crenshaw, 8-7, midway through the second quarter. Demetric Woodard Jr. set up the score with a 14-yard interception return to the Cougars' 17-yard line. 
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SPORTS
January 7, 1991 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So who's that nippin' at your heels again, Bo Jackson? Turns out it's speed racer cornerback, Rod Jones, and the Cincinnati Bengals, who defeated the Houston Oilers on Sunday to advance to next week's playoff game against the Raiders at the Coliseum. The game is a rematch of a Dec. 16 regular-season meeting in which the Raiders pretty much manhandled Cincinnati, 24-7. The Raiders expect a different group of Bengals this time around.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2012 | By Roger Vincent
Century City-based holding company Topa Equities Ltd. has named James R. Brooks to head its real estate management division. Brooks, 55, is president of Topa Management Co., which manages about 4 million square feet of commercial real estate and 3,000 apartments in California, Hawaii and the U.S. Virgin Islands. After earning a degree in engineering at UCLA, Brooks spent 12 years with the Koll Co., a Newport Beach real estate services company. He also worked several years with Morgan Stanley Real Estate Fund and Tishman Speyer Properties.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1994 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Writer-director James L. Brooks' "I'll Do Anything" drew a lot of unwanted attention last summer when people recruited for a test screening said some of the musical numbers, performed by actors not known for their voices, stopped the action cold. Drastically revising his movie, Brooks took most of the music out, and audiences responded more favorably. Even so, Brooks was determined to make a musical about Hollywood.
SPORTS
March 19, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
James Brooks, the Cincinnati Bengals' all-time rushing leader, signed a contract with the Cleveland Browns as a Plan B free agent.
SPORTS
August 30, 2013 | By Steve Galluzzo
James Brooks' 11-yard touchdown run has increased Long Beach Poly's lead over Crenshaw to 15-7 early in the third quarter at Veterans Stadium.   
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1986 | John M. Wilson
When director James Brooks asked some pickup dribblers to put their basketball game on hold last weekend on the courts at Westwood's St. Timothy's Church so he could do location shooting, they had this nagging feeling that something was missing. Like permits. And a union crew. Turns out Brooks was doing a bit of personal experimenting with video images and equipment for some TV news-type inserts for his next Fox film, now untitled and in preproduction--TV news figures prominently in the hush-hush plot.
NEWS
June 11, 1995 | Peter Rainer
This James Brooks comedy was rapped when it came out in 1994 because all the musical numbers in it were scrapped, but it's still worth seeing. Nick Nolte plays a single dad struggling to balance his meager acting career with fatherhood. Albert Brooks and Julie Kavner (pictured) play unlikely lovebirds, and they're both marvelous.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1986 | Craig Modderno
Burt Reynolds will play a detective who quits the force after a failed drug bust and gets involved with a hooker who's witnessed a murder of his peers in "Rent-a-Cop," to begin filming at the end of October in Chicago and Rome. . . . William Hurt is a TV anchorman in an untitled film written/directed by James Brooks. Brooks' first picture since "Terms Of Endearment," it begins filming here in February. . . . Five-time national Go-Kart champ Jesse Samples Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
Polly Platt, the Oscar-nominated production designer of such films as "The Last Picture Show" and "Terms of Endearment" and producer of "Broadcast News" and "Say Anything," has died. She was 72. Platt died Wednesday of Lou Gehrig's disease at her home in Brooklyn, N.Y., according to her daughter, Antonia Bogdanovich. As a production designer, Platt was best known for creating the distinctive period sets on films directed by her former husband Peter Bogdanovich, including "The Last Picture Show" and "Paper Moon.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
James L. Brooks always follows his heart. Both what's best about his work as a writer-director ? and sections of his new "How Do You Know" are wonderful ? and what is not come from the same source: a complete faith in his personal instincts. Instincts that, inevitably, can let him down. Brooks' films include "Terms of Endearment," "Broadcast News" and "As Good as It Gets" and no one working today creates romantic comedy characters as invigorating, involving and idiosyncratic. No one has his ability to depict people as they are, people so self-aware we hold our breath in anticipation of what their next move will be in the neurotic dance of insecurity and attraction, despair and love.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2007 | Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writer
Inside a wire cage in the back of an Orange County courtroom, a middle-aged woman barely a smidgen taller than 4 feet stands up to answer charges of petty theft. "She's a little thing," says Superior Court Judge James M. Brooks. "Is she on her knees?" Without warning, he rises from the bench and puts his hands on his hips as he addresses her, pretending he doesn't believe she can really be so small. "Are you trying to fool me?" he says, unable to keep a straight face. She smiles back at him.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2004 | R. Kinsey Lowe, Times Staff Writer
"Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events" lifted Paramount's fortunes over the weekend, delivering an estimated $30.2 million and the studio's third No. 1 opening this year. The Paramount-Nickelodeon-DreamWorks co-production directed by Brad Silberling predictably attracted families and kids, with moviegoers 16 and younger making up 25% of the audience, parents 25% and the other 50% composed of what Paramount described as "mainstream moviegoers over 16." James L.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2000 | GREG MILLER
Internet entertainment firm Shockwave.com said it has completed a deal in which producer and screenwriter James L. Brooks will create a series of short animations for the fledgling Web site. San Francisco-based Shockwave, launched last year by software company Macromedia Inc., said the content will be created by Brooks' Gracie Films company. Brooks, who will receive equity in Shockwave as part of the deal, is best known as executive producer of "The Simpsons" and "The Mary Tyler Moore Show."
SPORTS
December 19, 1999 | Associated Press
Auburn, embarrassed that former NFL running back James Brooks revealed at a court hearing that he could barely read or write, is going to pay for his court-ordered literacy program. Brooks left the Alabama school without a degree when he became the San Diego Chargers' No. 1 draft pick in 1981, but returned to take classes in 1982 and 1983. After playing three seasons for the Chargers, Brooks played eight more for the Cincinnati Bengals and is the team's all-time leading rusher with 6,447 yards.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1997 | SEAN MITCHELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Upstairs at Chasen's, in the Jockey Club bar where men can smoke cigars and eat chili, Jack Nicholson and James L. Brooks are doing both. Seated in an ornately brocaded booth in the late afternoon light that will soon be gone, the two Hollywood long-ball hitters lob compliments at each other through the pungent haze, jog back through the mists of fable, laugh, kid, ponder and take stock of their unordinary lives as a reporter tosses questions on the table between them.
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