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James Brown

ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2011
Adele's voice has given her the biggest success this year — and the most trouble. The singer will have throat surgery and has now canceled all tour dates and promotional appearances for the year. Columbia Records announced Friday that the "Rolling in the Deep" singer will have surgery "to alleviate the current issues with her throat. " A full recovery is expected. Earlier this month, the 23-year-old performer canceled a U.S. concert run due to a hemorrhage in her vocal cord; she also canceled concerts in June due to laryngitis.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2011 | By Kevin Thomas
A beautifully structured and photographed film, John Turturro's rapturous "Passione" offers a vibrant exploration and celebration of Neapolitan music in all its grit and glory, presenting 23 musical numbers that encompass a millennium's worth of influences. Turturro observes that Naples has been invaded by Arabs, Normans, France, Spain and the U.S. and points out that it has survived volcanic eruptions, wars, crime, poverty and neglect. For Turturro the place and the music are one, and he embraces both with love and respect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2011 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
James M. Humes, appointed a top staff member Wednesday by Gov. Jerry Brown, is a lawyer who established a reputation in the attorney general's office as an affable, loyal and decisive manager who protected Brown but was not afraid to disagree with him. Brown named Humes executive secretary for administration, legal affairs and policy at a salary of $175,000 a year. The job, akin to a chief of staff, does not need Senate confirmation. Humes ran the attorney general's office under Brown, overseeing a staff of 5,300, including 1,100 lawyers, and gave up a likely judicial appointment to continue to serve his old boss.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2010 | By Randy Lewis
"The T.A.M.I. Show," the fabled film document of an equally legendary 1964 concert in Santa Monica with the Rolling Stones, James Brown, the Beach Boys, Marvin Gaye, the Supremes, Chuck Berry and a half-dozen other acts, has a back story that reads like the inspiration for the Stones' observation years later about getting what you need even when you don't get what you want. As originally planned, "The T.A.M.I. Show" was supposed to be considerably more than a concert film featuring several of the day's hottest pop-music acts.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2009 | Robert Hilburn
If there was still skepticism six months ago that an African American could be elected president of the United States, imagine how unlikely the prospect felt to Nat King Cole a half-century ago when he recorded the song "We Are Americans Too." Cole's recording session came just one month after some white supremacists assaulted him on stage during a concert in April 1956 in Montgomery, Ala. He never performed another concert in the South.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2008 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
A new trustee was appointed Tuesday in the fight over James Brown's estate, a move attorneys involved in the dispute say puts them a step closer to a settlement after two years of litigation. South Carolina Judge Jack Earlier said the new trustee, accountant Russell Bauknight, will review a proposed settlement over how to parcel out the late soul singer's estate and trust, then recommend whether the judge should approve it. -- ASSOCIATED PRESS
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2008 | Robert Hilburn, Special to The Times
On April 5, 1968, James Brown stood as a voice of reason and restraint in a city on the edge of rampage. The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had been assassinated the day before in Memphis, Tenn., and the sense of outrage and hurt in African American communities led to rioting in more than 100 U.S. cities. Boston might have joined that list except for the heroics of Brown.
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