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James Burgess

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1988
The Southern California Rapid Transit District confirmed Friday that its police chief, James Burgess, who had faced allegations of misconduct, will resume his duties Monday after a six-week leave. RTD General Manager Alan Pegg in Los Angeles issued a statement saying Burgess is returning to work after a personnel hearing earlier this week.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
The chief of the RTD's police force, who is under investigation by the district attorney's office, has gone on sick leave and may not return to his duties. James Burgess, who became the Transit Police Department's first chief in 1978, left Nov. 30 and will be eligible for retirement benefits in February. Deputy Dist. Atty. Herb Lapin, who is overseeing an investigation of ticket canceling by Burgess, said Friday, "It's our understanding he is not coming back."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
RTD Police Chief James Burgess was placed on paid leave Wednesday pending the outcome of a transit district investigation into allegations that Burgess engaged in nepotism and ticket-fixing. General Manager Alan Pegg confirmed that he placed Burgess, who has headed the department since 1978, on leave pending further investigation. "Clearly we have a set of issues we regard as important," Pegg said in a telephone interview Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1988
The Southern California Rapid Transit District confirmed Friday that its police chief, James Burgess, who had faced allegations of misconduct, will resume his duties Monday after a six-week leave. RTD General Manager Alan Pegg in Los Angeles issued a statement saying Burgess is returning to work after a personnel hearing earlier this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
The chief of the RTD's police force, who is under investigation by the district attorney's office, has gone on sick leave and may not return to his duties. James Burgess, who became the Transit Police Department's first chief in 1978, left Nov. 30 and will be eligible for retirement benefits in February. Deputy Dist. Atty. Herb Lapin, who is overseeing an investigation of ticket canceling by Burgess, said Friday, "It's our understanding he is not coming back."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
RTD Police Chief James Burgess, faced with a series of allegations of wrongdoing and mismanagement by a former subordinate, acknowledged Friday that he personally approved the hiring of his daughter and nephew and stayed as a guest at an RTD contractor's Palm Springs condominium.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County district attorney's office said Thursday it will investigate allegations that RTD Police Chief James Burgess violated the state's anti-ticket-fixing law. Deputy Dist. Atty. Steven A. Sowders, who heads the special investigation unit, said the probe will focus on whether Burgess violated the law last year when he voided a batch of parking tickets issued by one of his officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
The RTD's transit police chief, who is the focus of an internal agency investigation for alleged nepotism and mismanagement, may have run afoul of a tough new anti-ticket-fixing law when he ordered dozens of parking citations canceled last year.
MAGAZINE
September 14, 1986
Perhaps we need a Devil's Island for the perpetrators of AIDS and drugs. In a couple of generations, it's possible that we'll be rid of both--through self-administered self-destruction. James Burgess Camarillo
NEWS
August 21, 1985
The Southern California Rapid Transit District is literally watching for thefts, assaults and other crimes on 900 of its 2,600 buses--by installing surveillance cameras. "We're looking for every method possible to avoid criminal activity," said James Burgess, the RTD's chief of transit police. The project, which began March 20, comes during a dispute over the severity of crime on the transit lines. A recent UCLA report said crime was 20 to 30 times higher than RTD figures show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County district attorney's office said Thursday it will investigate allegations that RTD Police Chief James Burgess violated the state's anti-ticket-fixing law. Deputy Dist. Atty. Steven A. Sowders, who heads the special investigation unit, said the probe will focus on whether Burgess violated the law last year when he voided a batch of parking tickets issued by one of his officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
RTD Police Chief James Burgess was placed on paid leave Wednesday pending the outcome of a transit district investigation into allegations that Burgess engaged in nepotism and ticket-fixing. General Manager Alan Pegg confirmed that he placed Burgess, who has headed the department since 1978, on leave pending further investigation. "Clearly we have a set of issues we regard as important," Pegg said in a telephone interview Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
The RTD's transit police chief, who is the focus of an internal agency investigation for alleged nepotism and mismanagement, may have run afoul of a tough new anti-ticket-fixing law when he ordered dozens of parking citations canceled last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1988 | RICH CONNELL, Times Staff Writer
RTD Police Chief James Burgess, faced with a series of allegations of wrongdoing and mismanagement by a former subordinate, acknowledged Friday that he personally approved the hiring of his daughter and nephew and stayed as a guest at an RTD contractor's Palm Springs condominium.
NEWS
March 12, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The Illinois Army National Guard's former chief of staff has been arrested and charged with using bribes and lying under oath to thwart an investigation into his alleged sexual misconduct. Col. James M. Burgess could spend up to 85 years in prison and be fined $2.5 million if convicted. The indictment alleged obstruction of a proceeding, two counts of perjury, two counts of bribery, three counts of witness tampering and two counts of false statements.
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