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James Burks

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1989 | DOUGLAS SADOWNICK
Every summer for the last four years the African Market Place and Cultural Faire has provided the arena for the black and multicultural arts scene of Los Angeles to stage a rare celebration of its creativity. To newcomers, the beat heard is familiar--but mysterious and disorienting. The drums reverberate reggae, the flutes jazz. Or is it gospel? Or the blues? Or folklorico? Then there's the poetry readings, children's song workshops, pottery vendors, and lavish ritual musical enactments.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2012
James E. Burke Johnson & Johnson CEO during Tylenol poisoning James E. Burke, the former Johnson & Johnson chief executive whose leadership during the Tylenol poisoning scare of the 1980s became a model for corporate crisis management, died Friday in New Jersey after a long, unspecified illness, the company announced. He was 87. Burke, who ran the New Brunswick, N.J., company for 13 of his 37 years there, also had a big impact in his second career, as chairman of the Partnership for a Drug-Free America for 16 years.
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NEWS
September 4, 1994 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The very first one, James Burks recalls, was built out of twigs and clay--an 8-year-old's Spartan vision of an earth-toned Africa. "It turned out to be a nice little project," Burks says, his stern face relaxing into smile at the memory of the little village of mud huts molded with his own small hands. Nowadays, Burks knows that constructing an African village isn't as simple as getting one's hands muddy in a labor of love.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2010 | By Dick Lochte, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Glass Rainbow A Novel James Lee Burke Simon & Schuster: 434 pp., $25.99 In crafting his novels, James Lee Burke has been nothing if not consistent when it comes to quality. Or to characters and plot. His repeated battles of good versus evil in the humid crucible of southern Louisiana are expertly and stylishly rendered, but they've also become undeniably formulaic. Trying to shake things up with the last entry, "Swan Peak," the author sent his hero Dave Robicheaux to the mountains of Montana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1996
A black doll show is on exhibit at the William Grant Still Arts Center in the Mid-City area. Titled "Dolls as Companion, Image, Treasure, Rituals and Toys," the show features dolls from the collections of Los Angeles-area lenders, said James Burks, director of the arts center, which is sponsored by the city's Cultural Affairs Department. "We've been doing this for 16 years. It's a tradition now," Burks said, adding that he believes the center's black doll show was the first of its kind in the nation when it opened in 1980.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | DICK LOCHTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The last few entries in James Lee Burke's series about Louisiana lawman Dave Robicheaux seemed to suggest that the author had pumped all he could out of that patch of ground. Plot threads were being repeated. His hero had become unbearably sanctimonious. His previously eloquent descriptions of the bayous were drifting into self-parody (". . . the sun should have risen out of the water like a mist-shrouded egg yolk, but it didn't").
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2012
James E. Burke Johnson & Johnson CEO during Tylenol poisoning James E. Burke, the former Johnson & Johnson chief executive whose leadership during the Tylenol poisoning scare of the 1980s became a model for corporate crisis management, died Friday in New Jersey after a long, unspecified illness, the company announced. He was 87. Burke, who ran the New Brunswick, N.J., company for 13 of his 37 years there, also had a big impact in his second career, as chairman of the Partnership for a Drug-Free America for 16 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2010 | By Dick Lochte, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Glass Rainbow A Novel James Lee Burke Simon & Schuster: 434 pp., $25.99 In crafting his novels, James Lee Burke has been nothing if not consistent when it comes to quality. Or to characters and plot. His repeated battles of good versus evil in the humid crucible of southern Louisiana are expertly and stylishly rendered, but they've also become undeniably formulaic. Trying to shake things up with the last entry, "Swan Peak," the author sent his hero Dave Robicheaux to the mountains of Montana.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2007 | Dick Lochte, Special to The Times
"AS we crossed under the elevated highway and headed toward the Convention Center, I saw one image that will never leave me and that will remain emblematic of my experience in New Orleans, La., on Monday, August 29, in the year of Our Lord, 2005. The body of a fat black man was bobbing facedown against a piling. His dress clothes were puffed with air, his arms floating straight out from his sides. A dirty skim of yellow froth from our wake washed over his head.
NEWS
July 27, 1995 | LEE DEMBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Those of us who lived through the '60s seem destined (some might say doomed) to fight those fights all of our lives. One of the overarching themes of that seminal decade was protest against the straight jacket of conformity that society imposes. Play by the rules or you don't play. Those who get ahead are the cautious and unimaginative. Free spirits are left behind. In the years since, little has changed, but the rebellious strand of the '60s has not given up.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2009 | Dick Lochte, Lochte is the author of 10 novels, including the comedy-thriller "Croaked!"
After getting the lay of the literary land in James Lee Burke's new Texas-based crime novel, I was reminded of a friend mentioning -- with film-buff certainty -- that Howard Hawks' classic western "Red River" was in fact an uncredited reworking of the sea adventure "Mutiny on the Bounty." In spite of certain plot similarities, I was not then, nor am I now, at all convinced. Nor do I think that Burke's "Rain Gods" is a reworking of Cormac McCarthy's "No Country for Old Men."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2008 | Nicholas A. Basbanes, Special to The Times
Every year about this time, I eagerly await the latest novel from the pen of James Lee Burke, and if I'm lucky, it will be an adventure featuring the New Iberia, La., deputy sheriff Dave Robicheaux, for my money the best continuing American character today, a counterpart on these shores to Adam Dalgleish of Scotland Yard, the masterful creation of the incomparable P.D. James.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2007 | Dick Lochte, Special to The Times
"AS we crossed under the elevated highway and headed toward the Convention Center, I saw one image that will never leave me and that will remain emblematic of my experience in New Orleans, La., on Monday, August 29, in the year of Our Lord, 2005. The body of a fat black man was bobbing facedown against a piling. His dress clothes were puffed with air, his arms floating straight out from his sides. A dirty skim of yellow froth from our wake washed over his head.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2006 | Dick Lochte, Special to The Times
When introduced in the 1987 crime novel "The Neon Rain," James Lee Burke's Louisiana lawman Dave Robicheaux was living in New Orleans, a homicide lieutenant suffering from alcoholism, self-loathing and job burnout. By the following year's sequel, "Heaven's Prisoners," he had retreated to his considerably less spoiled Acadian hometown of New Iberia, seeking sobriety and redemption.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2005 | Dick Lochte, Special to The Times
James Lee Burke's 13th novel featuring one of crime fiction's most famously flawed heroes, the guilt-ridden, alcoholic, hot-headed, self-destructive Louisiana lawman Dave Robicheaux, begins with a story from Dave's book of painful memories. In the summer of 1958, with college on the horizon, he and his reckless half-brother, Jimmie, join a doodlebug crew laying rubber cable and seismic jugs in the search for energy reserves along the Louisiana-Texas coastline.
BOOKS
January 18, 2004 | Eugen Weber, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
In Ethan Black's splendid "Dead for Life," an innocent New York cop is pilloried for dereliction of duty. A raging, resourceful, persistent cur -- determined to liquidate his prey for no evident reason -- claims that responsibility for his murders lies with Det. Conrad Voort. To save his honor and his career, Voort must discover the killer's motivation and foil his plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2005 | Dick Lochte, Special to The Times
James Lee Burke's 13th novel featuring one of crime fiction's most famously flawed heroes, the guilt-ridden, alcoholic, hot-headed, self-destructive Louisiana lawman Dave Robicheaux, begins with a story from Dave's book of painful memories. In the summer of 1958, with college on the horizon, he and his reckless half-brother, Jimmie, join a doodlebug crew laying rubber cable and seismic jugs in the search for energy reserves along the Louisiana-Texas coastline.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2006 | Dick Lochte, Special to The Times
When introduced in the 1987 crime novel "The Neon Rain," James Lee Burke's Louisiana lawman Dave Robicheaux was living in New Orleans, a homicide lieutenant suffering from alcoholism, self-loathing and job burnout. By the following year's sequel, "Heaven's Prisoners," he had retreated to his considerably less spoiled Acadian hometown of New Iberia, seeking sobriety and redemption.
NEWS
June 19, 2002 | DICK LOCHTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Several of James Lee Burke's more recent novels about Louisiana lawman Dave Robicheaux have been examples of style over substance. This is not meant as a complaint, exactly; not when you're dealing with a stylist whose poetic way with words is stunningly effective, whether being used to describe bayou tranquillity or barroom violence.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | DICK LOCHTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The last few entries in James Lee Burke's series about Louisiana lawman Dave Robicheaux seemed to suggest that the author had pumped all he could out of that patch of ground. Plot threads were being repeated. His hero had become unbearably sanctimonious. His previously eloquent descriptions of the bayous were drifting into self-parody (". . . the sun should have risen out of the water like a mist-shrouded egg yolk, but it didn't").
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