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James Buster Douglas

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SPORTS
February 18, 1990 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ballroom chandelier lights went out and a spotlight shone on the Ohio State football greats as they walked to the dais. Each time the spotlight illuminated one of the figures from Columbus' past, a volley of cheers went up in the darkness. One by one, they strode down the aisle, bathed in white light and cheers: Jack Tatum, Archie Griffin, Chris Spielman, Howard "Hopalong" Cassady . . .
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SPORTS
February 10, 2000 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ed Schuyler, the Associated Press' distinguished fight journalist, approached the customs officer at Tokyo's Narita Airport. This was 10 years ago, when Schuyler and other boxing writers began arriving in Japan to cover the Mike Tyson-Buster Douglas heavyweight title fight. The officer inspected Schuyler's passport, then asked him what his business was in Japan. Schuyler told him he was covering the fight. "How long do you expect to be working in Japan?" the officer said.
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SPORTS
June 5, 1992
James (Buster) Douglas, who briefly held the world heavyweight boxing title, was found not guilty of drunken driving by a Franklin County Municipal jury in Columbus, Ohio. Douglas, however, was found guilty of speeding and was fined $75 and court costs.
SPORTS
February 1, 1998 | STEVE SPRINGER
Roy Jones Jr., not content with being considered by some the best pound-for-pound fighter in the world, continues to search for new worlds to conquer. He found one this week. Jones, having already renounced his World Boxing Council light-heavyweight championship, will make the big plunge and take on heavyweight Buster Douglas May 2 in Atlantic City, N.J.
SPORTS
March 14, 1996 | STEVE SPRINGER
Six years ago, James "Buster" Douglas came out of obscurity to shock the world by handing Mike Tyson his only defeat. Later that same year, Douglas disappeared back into obscurity after losing the heavyweight title to Evander Holyfield. Douglas hasn't been heard from since. Until now. In a sport in which middle-aged Roberto Duran and Larry Holmes are still able to obtain boxing licenses, retirement is often only a temporary condition.
NEWS
February 11, 1990
James (Buster) Douglas knocked out heavyweight champion Mike Tyson in the 10th round at the Tokyo Dome today in one of the biggest upsets in boxing history. Douglas, 29, the fourth-ranked contender, felled the previously unbeaten champion with a five-punch combination to the head at 1:23 of the round. Tyson rolled over at the count of five and reached for his mouthpiece. He was on his hands and knees when the referee counted him out.
SPORTS
February 17, 1990 | Newsday
In a development almost as unexpected as Mike Tyson's knockout loss to James (Buster) Douglas last Saturday night in Tokyo, Jose Sulaiman, the president of the World Boxing Council, will tender his irrevocable resignation at a meeting of his executive committee in Mexico City Wednesday.
SPORTS
March 14, 1996 | STEVE SPRINGER
Six years ago, James "Buster" Douglas came out of obscurity to shock the world by handing Mike Tyson his only defeat. Later that same year, Douglas disappeared back into obscurity after losing the heavyweight title to Evander Holyfield. Douglas hasn't been heard from since. Until now. In a sport in which middle-aged Roberto Duran and Larry Holmes are still able to obtain boxing licenses, retirement is often only a temporary condition.
SPORTS
July 6, 1994 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former heavyweight boxing champion Buster Douglas was hospitalized and was reportedly in a diabetic coma in Columbus, Ohio. WBNS-TV, citing no sources, said Douglas, 34, was upgraded from poor to stable condition at Grant Medical Center, but a hospital spokeswoman said the family asked that no information be released. Unidentified relatives of the former boxer had told the station Douglas was taken to the hospital Monday and had slipped in and out of a coma since then.
SPORTS
June 5, 1992
James (Buster) Douglas, who briefly held the world heavyweight boxing title, was found not guilty of drunken driving by a Franklin County Municipal jury in Columbus, Ohio. Douglas, however, was found guilty of speeding and was fined $75 and court costs.
SPORTS
February 15, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former heavyweight champion Buster Douglas was released on his own recognizance Friday after being charged with drunken driving near Westerville, Ohio.
SPORTS
March 21, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A New York federal court judge dismissed a lawsuit in which Mike Tyson sought to block sanctioning of the April 19 heavyweight title bout between Evander Holyfield and George Foreman. Tyson sued after claiming he was entitled to a rematch with Buster Douglas.
SPORTS
February 27, 1991 | MIKE DOWNEY
On the telephone Tuesday, when I asked Mike Tyson if he could describe what sort offighter he considered Donovan (Razor) Ruddock to be, Tyson said: "All I know is that on March 18, he will be a beat-up fighter." Ever since I received a Christmas card from Razor in 1989, I have been eager to see how he fares in the ring against the former heavyweight champion of the world.
SPORTS
October 24, 1990 | MELVIN DURSLAG
Giving deep and enduring thought to James (Buster) Douglas, heavyweight champion of the universe, you can allow, in a first judgment, that Buster has burgeoned as a formidable fighting machine. But in a second judgment, you see Buster as one of those horses that ascends Olympus on Derby Day and vanishes as quickly as he rose.
SPORTS
November 8, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
Time was in this country when you knew who all the boxing champions were. I mean, Jack Dempsey was the heavyweight champ--period. You didn't need a box of initials to identify him. Joe Louis was champ. Everybody in the world knew it. Today, you not only don't know who the division champs are, you don't even know what the divisions are. In the old days, there were eight of them--flyweight, bantamweight, featherweight, lightweight, welterweight, middleweight, light-heavyweight and heavyweight.
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