Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJames Byrd
IN THE NEWS

James Byrd

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
June 14, 1998 | JOHN LEWIS, Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), a veteran civil rights leader, is the author of "Walking With the Wind: A Memoir of the Movement" (Simon & Schuster, 1998)
Some time during the night of Saturday, June 6, a tragic event took place near the small town of Jasper in eastern Texas. Three white men, two of whom belonged to white supremacist groups, are alleged to have killed James Byrd Jr., a black man, for no other reason than racial hatred. The three men, reports said, first beat Byrd, then chained him to the back of a pickup and dragged him down a winding country road for two miles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
July 9, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
On June 11, just before the City Council fired this town's first African American police chief, the Rev. John D. Hardin addressed the packed council chambers, blacks sitting on one side, whites on the other. Hardin, the 82-year-old pastor of the black Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church, paraphrased lyrics from an old song by Texas country legends Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings, "Just to Satisfy You": Somebody's gonna get hurt before we're through, And don't be surprised If that somebody is you. It wasn't so much a warning as a plea for this East Texas logging town to avoid racial conflict.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
August 20, 2002 | LIANNE HART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About the robbery, this much is certain: In the spring of 1997, a man driving a mustard yellow Subaru pulled up to a house on the east side of Fort Worth. The driver eased out of the car, strolled into an open garage and stole a leaf blower and lawn edger. The homeowner, Sandee White, ran outside and screamed at the thief to stop. "Get back or I'll shoot you," he shouted back, gesturing with what appeared to be a gun in his pocket. White scribbled down his license plate number as he sped away.
NEWS
June 8, 2003 | Mark Babineck, Associated Press Writer
Unav Wade scoffs at the talk of Jasper's healing and reconciliation in the five years since James Byrd Jr. was dragged to death for being black. Don't get her wrong; Wade says she enjoys life in this racially balanced city of about 8,300 tucked in the woods of east Texas. It's just that she believes Jasper's black-and-white divide hasn't narrowed much. "I do have some really nice white friends here, I do. It's not many, but they love me and I know it," Wade said.
NATIONAL
July 9, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
On June 11, just before the City Council fired this town's first African American police chief, the Rev. John D. Hardin addressed the packed council chambers, blacks sitting on one side, whites on the other. Hardin, the 82-year-old pastor of the black Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church, paraphrased lyrics from an old song by Texas country legends Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings, "Just to Satisfy You": Somebody's gonna get hurt before we're through, And don't be surprised If that somebody is you. It wasn't so much a warning as a plea for this East Texas logging town to avoid racial conflict.
NEWS
September 17, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A black man dragged to his death behind a pickup truck, allegedly by three white supremacists, was alive until he struck a culvert and was decapitated, an expert witness said in Bryan, Texas, before the prosecution rested in the trial of Lawrence Brewer. Forensic pathologist Tommy Brown, who conducted an autopsy on James Byrd, 49, said he could only pray Byrd was not conscious at his death. Brewer's prison friend, John King, was convicted of the murder in February and was sentenced to die.
NEWS
September 18, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Lawrence Russell Brewer took the stand in his own defense in Bryan, Texas, and blamed the brutal dragging death of a black man on a co-defendant. Sobbing, the former leader of a racist prison gang told the jury: "I didn't mean to cause his death." It was the first testimony by one of the three men charged with killing James Byrd Jr. Brewer admitted he was in the pickup truck with co-defendants Shawn Berry and John William King when Byrd was dragged to his death in June 1998.
NEWS
October 26, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Jury selection began for the last of three white men arrested in the dragging death of a black man in Jasper, Texas. Shawn Allen Berry, 24, is hoping to avoid the fate of his two white supremacist co-defendants, John William King and Lawrence Russell Brewer. They were convicted of capital murder and sentenced to death for the June 1998 slaying of James Byrd Jr., 49, who was chained to a pickup and dragged nearly three miles.
NEWS
January 27, 1999 | Associated Press
A prospective juror in the trial of a white man accused of dragging a black man to death was excused Tuesday after disclosing that a relative received letters from the defendant laced with racist remarks. Donald Halmon, a construction worker, was one of seven people released from jury service in the murder trial of John William King, the first of three white men to be tried in the June 7 slaying of James Byrd Jr.
NEWS
June 8, 2003 | Mark Babineck, Associated Press Writer
Unav Wade scoffs at the talk of Jasper's healing and reconciliation in the five years since James Byrd Jr. was dragged to death for being black. Don't get her wrong; Wade says she enjoys life in this racially balanced city of about 8,300 tucked in the woods of east Texas. It's just that she believes Jasper's black-and-white divide hasn't narrowed much. "I do have some really nice white friends here, I do. It's not many, but they love me and I know it," Wade said.
NATIONAL
August 20, 2002 | LIANNE HART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About the robbery, this much is certain: In the spring of 1997, a man driving a mustard yellow Subaru pulled up to a house on the east side of Fort Worth. The driver eased out of the car, strolled into an open garage and stole a leaf blower and lawn edger. The homeowner, Sandee White, ran outside and screamed at the thief to stop. "Get back or I'll shoot you," he shouted back, gesturing with what appeared to be a gun in his pocket. White scribbled down his license plate number as he sped away.
NEWS
October 26, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Jury selection began for the last of three white men arrested in the dragging death of a black man in Jasper, Texas. Shawn Allen Berry, 24, is hoping to avoid the fate of his two white supremacist co-defendants, John William King and Lawrence Russell Brewer. They were convicted of capital murder and sentenced to death for the June 1998 slaying of James Byrd Jr., 49, who was chained to a pickup and dragged nearly three miles.
NEWS
September 18, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Lawrence Russell Brewer took the stand in his own defense in Bryan, Texas, and blamed the brutal dragging death of a black man on a co-defendant. Sobbing, the former leader of a racist prison gang told the jury: "I didn't mean to cause his death." It was the first testimony by one of the three men charged with killing James Byrd Jr. Brewer admitted he was in the pickup truck with co-defendants Shawn Berry and John William King when Byrd was dragged to his death in June 1998.
NEWS
September 17, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A black man dragged to his death behind a pickup truck, allegedly by three white supremacists, was alive until he struck a culvert and was decapitated, an expert witness said in Bryan, Texas, before the prosecution rested in the trial of Lawrence Brewer. Forensic pathologist Tommy Brown, who conducted an autopsy on James Byrd, 49, said he could only pray Byrd was not conscious at his death. Brewer's prison friend, John King, was convicted of the murder in February and was sentenced to die.
NEWS
January 27, 1999 | Associated Press
A prospective juror in the trial of a white man accused of dragging a black man to death was excused Tuesday after disclosing that a relative received letters from the defendant laced with racist remarks. Donald Halmon, a construction worker, was one of seven people released from jury service in the murder trial of John William King, the first of three white men to be tried in the June 7 slaying of James Byrd Jr.
OPINION
June 14, 1998 | JOHN LEWIS, Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), a veteran civil rights leader, is the author of "Walking With the Wind: A Memoir of the Movement" (Simon & Schuster, 1998)
Some time during the night of Saturday, June 6, a tragic event took place near the small town of Jasper in eastern Texas. Three white men, two of whom belonged to white supremacist groups, are alleged to have killed James Byrd Jr., a black man, for no other reason than racial hatred. The three men, reports said, first beat Byrd, then chained him to the back of a pickup and dragged him down a winding country road for two miles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Erma Ora James Byrd, 88, the wife of U.S. Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.) for nearly 69 years, died Saturday at their home in McLean, Va., after battling a long illness, Byrd's office said.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Three black friends testified on behalf of a white man accused of dragging a black man to death in Jasper, Texas, behind a pickup truck, saying they don't believe he's a racist. Shawn Allen Berry is expected to testify today, his attorney said. Prosecutors charge that Berry, 24, participated in the June 7, 1998, dragging death of James Byrd Jr., making him as culpable as his two former roommates.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|