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OPINION
January 25, 1987
"We're getting our house in order and getting our act together," said James C. Fletcher, head of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, on Jan. 9, adding, "We have turned the corner in our recovery efforts." I hope he's right, but I have my doubt about the confidence behind a statement that begins with three cliches in a row. LEON LUKASZEWSKI Walnut Creek
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NEWS
April 13, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Bush turned Wednesday to Navy Rear Adm. Richard H. Truly, a veteran of two space shuttle flights, to take over the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. "This marks the first time in its distinguished history that NASA will be led by a hero of its own making, an astronaut who has been to space," Bush said at a White House ceremony at which he announced his plans to nominate Truly to succeed James C. Fletcher. Truly has been the agency's associate administrator for space flight since 1986.
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NEWS
April 13, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Bush turned Wednesday to Navy Rear Adm. Richard H. Truly, a veteran of two space shuttle flights, to take over the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. "This marks the first time in its distinguished history that NASA will be led by a hero of its own making, an astronaut who has been to space," Bush said at a White House ceremony at which he announced his plans to nominate Truly to succeed James C. Fletcher. Truly has been the agency's associate administrator for space flight since 1986.
NEWS
March 22, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
James C. Fletcher, who returned to the helm of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration during its darkest hours, announced his resignation Tuesday, effective April 8. Fletcher, 69, who had served as NASA administrator from April of 1971 to May of 1977, reluctantly accepted the post in 1986 for a second time in the aftermath of the Challenger explosion, the nation's worst space disaster.
NEWS
March 22, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
James C. Fletcher, who returned to the helm of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration during its darkest hours, announced his resignation Tuesday, effective April 8. Fletcher, 69, who had served as NASA administrator from April of 1971 to May of 1977, reluctantly accepted the post in 1986 for a second time in the aftermath of the Challenger explosion, the nation's worst space disaster.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | From Associated Press
Dale D. Myers, the acting administrator of NASA and one of the men brought back to the agency following the Challenger accident, is resigning May 13, officials announced Friday. Myers, 67, became acting administrator last week after Administrator James C. Fletcher resigned.
NEWS
March 26, 1987
NASA Administrator James C. Fletcher declared his intention to "get flying again" by February with the next space shuttle. Fletcher, in a speech before the Federal City Club in Washington, said he is equally determined to establish a "permanent manned presence in space" with a platform that will serve to launch and maintain observatories and provide a takeoff point for a manned flight to Mars. Others in the space program have cast doubts that a February shuttle launch is feasible.
NEWS
March 14, 1989 | From Associated Press
NASA Administrator James C. Fletcher said Monday that he expects President Bush to name a new head of the space agency within two weeks. Fletcher, who said months ago that he wanted to retire, made the announcement in an impromptu news conference after the launching of the space shuttle Discovery.
NEWS
April 30, 1986 | United Press International
The nomination of James C. Fletcher to return as head of the nation's troubled space agency was endorsed 15 to 1 today by the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee. The nomination now goes to the full Senate. Only Sen. Albert Gore Jr. (D-Tenn.) voted against the nomination, citing recent reports that audits by the General Accounting Office found extensive mismanagement and cost overruns at NASA, including the period in the 1970s when Fletcher held the top post.
OPINION
January 25, 1987
"We're getting our house in order and getting our act together," said James C. Fletcher, head of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, on Jan. 9, adding, "We have turned the corner in our recovery efforts." I hope he's right, but I have my doubt about the confidence behind a statement that begins with three cliches in a row. LEON LUKASZEWSKI Walnut Creek
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