Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJames C Iii Miller
IN THE NEWS

James C Iii Miller

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 14, 1988
White House budget chief James C. Miller III, attempting to keep the pressure on Congress to curb spending, warned on NBC's "Today" program that it may be necessary to impose Gramm-Rudman automatic budget cuts on a wide variety of domestic and military programs only a month before November's election. But budget officials on Capitol Hill dismissed Miller's warning, pointing out that lawmakers will be able to take relatively easy steps to prevent the automatic cuts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 29, 1988 | Associated Press
Budget Director James C. Miller III is resigning effective Oct. 15 and will be replaced by his deputy, Joseph R. Wright Jr., President Reagan announced Wednesday. Miller will become a fellow of the Center for Study of Public Choice at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., a Washington suburb.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 29, 1988 | Associated Press
Budget Director James C. Miller III is resigning effective Oct. 15 and will be replaced by his deputy, Joseph R. Wright Jr., President Reagan announced Wednesday. Miller will become a fellow of the Center for Study of Public Choice at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., a Washington suburb.
NEWS
July 29, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration warned Thursday that Congress is in danger of exceeding the spending limits set by the Gramm-Rudman budget law and may end up triggering automatic across-the-board cuts of more than $10 billion. In a briefing at the White House, James C. Miller III, director of the Office of Management and Budget, said that new budget projections compiled by his department show the government is only $5.9 billion away from having to impose the cutbacks.
NEWS
July 29, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration warned Thursday that Congress is in danger of exceeding the spending limits set by the Gramm-Rudman budget law and may end up triggering automatic across-the-board cuts of more than $10 billion. In a briefing at the White House, James C. Miller III, director of the Office of Management and Budget, said that new budget projections compiled by his department show the government is only $5.9 billion away from having to impose the cutbacks.
NEWS
April 18, 1987 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
The White House sought Friday to put distance between President Reagan and his budget director's criticism of the Federal Reserve, saying that James C. Miller III, was speaking for himself and not for the Administration when he warned that the board was risking a recession if it raised interest rates.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
The Federal Reserve Board is in danger of raising interest rates too much and plunging the nation into a recession next year, Budget Director James C. Miller III said Thursday in blunt remarks that could set off a major Reagan Administration dispute with Fed Chairman Paul A. Volcker. "Our greatest danger is overreaction," Miller told a breakfast meeting with reporters.
NEWS
March 24, 1987 | Associated Press
James C. Miller III, the Reagan Administration's budget chief, canceled a Monday night speaking engagement at the Cosmos Club after learning his appearance at the male-only club for the capital's elite would violate federal regulations. The federal personnel rule was pointed out to Miller by Ann Lewis, executive director of Americans for Democratic Action, a liberal group that often leads the charge against Reagan Administration policies. Miller responded Monday with a letter to John B.
NEWS
April 3, 1988 | United Press International
New Postmaster General Anthony M. Frank, on the eve of a postal rate increase, rejected as "nonsense" White House Budget Director James C. Miller III's proposal that the Postal Service be sold to private contractors. Frank, in an ABC News "Business World" interview taped for airing today, said: "I don't think (the Postal Service) should lose money, and it shouldn't make a profit, which means (it should) break even.
NEWS
April 8, 1988
Federal budget director James C. Miller III pushed the idea of turning over the Postal Service to private companies, as about 100 picketing postal workers accused him of trying to destroy the U.S. mail. Postmaster General Anthony M. Frank, appearing at the same Washington seminar, opposed the privatization idea and called for greater discretion for the service to manage its finances and set rates. The seminar was sponsored by the Cato Institute, a conservative policy research organization.
NEWS
June 14, 1988
White House budget chief James C. Miller III, attempting to keep the pressure on Congress to curb spending, warned on NBC's "Today" program that it may be necessary to impose Gramm-Rudman automatic budget cuts on a wide variety of domestic and military programs only a month before November's election. But budget officials on Capitol Hill dismissed Miller's warning, pointing out that lawmakers will be able to take relatively easy steps to prevent the automatic cuts.
NEWS
April 8, 1988
Federal budget director James C. Miller III pushed the idea of turning over the Postal Service to private companies, as about 100 picketing postal workers accused him of trying to destroy the U.S. mail. Postmaster General Anthony M. Frank, appearing at the same Washington seminar, opposed the privatization idea and called for greater discretion for the service to manage its finances and set rates. The seminar was sponsored by the Cato Institute, a conservative policy research organization.
NEWS
April 3, 1988 | United Press International
New Postmaster General Anthony M. Frank, on the eve of a postal rate increase, rejected as "nonsense" White House Budget Director James C. Miller III's proposal that the Postal Service be sold to private contractors. Frank, in an ABC News "Business World" interview taped for airing today, said: "I don't think (the Postal Service) should lose money, and it shouldn't make a profit, which means (it should) break even.
NEWS
March 11, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
A month and a half after President Reagan vowed in his State of the Union address to send Congress within 30 days a list of "pork barrel" items that he wants rescinded from the trillion-dollar federal budget, Budget Director James C. Miller III appeared in the White House press briefing room Thursday with recommendations that would eliminate $336.1 million in spending. Miller declared in what was nearly a roar: "Watch out, little piggies, because the wolf is at your door."
NEWS
April 18, 1987 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
The White House sought Friday to put distance between President Reagan and his budget director's criticism of the Federal Reserve, saying that James C. Miller III, was speaking for himself and not for the Administration when he warned that the board was risking a recession if it raised interest rates.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
The Federal Reserve Board is in danger of raising interest rates too much and plunging the nation into a recession next year, Budget Director James C. Miller III said Thursday in blunt remarks that could set off a major Reagan Administration dispute with Fed Chairman Paul A. Volcker. "Our greatest danger is overreaction," Miller told a breakfast meeting with reporters.
NEWS
March 11, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
A month and a half after President Reagan vowed in his State of the Union address to send Congress within 30 days a list of "pork barrel" items that he wants rescinded from the trillion-dollar federal budget, Budget Director James C. Miller III appeared in the White House press briefing room Thursday with recommendations that would eliminate $336.1 million in spending. Miller declared in what was nearly a roar: "Watch out, little piggies, because the wolf is at your door."
NEWS
March 24, 1987 | Associated Press
James C. Miller III, the Reagan Administration's budget chief, canceled a Monday night speaking engagement at the Cosmos Club after learning his appearance at the male-only club for the capital's elite would violate federal regulations. The federal personnel rule was pointed out to Miller by Ann Lewis, executive director of Americans for Democratic Action, a liberal group that often leads the charge against Reagan Administration policies. Miller responded Monday with a letter to John B.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|