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April 1, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
James Carter can play just about anything he wants on a saxophone. Brilliantly virtuosic, he is a master of soprano, alto, tenor and baritone saxophones, someone who can capture the natural timbre and character of each. So it was hard to understand why -- in his performance Tuesday at the Jazz Bakery -- Carter remained within such a narrow range of expression.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2013
Mel Smith British comedian, actor and director Mel Smith, 60, an actor, writer and director who was a major force in British comedy, died of a heart attack Friday at his home in northwest London, said his agent, Michael Foster. Smith shot to fame along with his partner-in-comedy Griff Rhys Jones in "Not the Nine O'Clock News," whose take-down of earnest BBC newscasts, talk shows and commercials would influence a generation of comedians. "We probably enjoyed ourselves far too much, but we had a roller coaster of a ride along the way. Terrific business.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2003 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
James Carter, who led a Mississippi chain gang in singing a work song that was recorded by a famed musicologist and, 40 years later, became part of the top-selling "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" soundtrack album, has died. He was 77. Carter, who had been in poor health and suffered a stroke, died Nov. 26 in a hospital in Oak Park, Ill. The son of a Mississippi sharecropper, Carter served in the Navy during World War II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2009 | Tony Perry
A San Diego grand jury has indicted a gang member in connection with a 2003 shooting that killed two women and wounded a 7-year-old boy on their way home from church. James Carter, 35, a member of the Skyline gang, has been indicted on two counts of murder, four counts of attempted murder and conspiracy to commit murder. He is in jail on an unrelated robbery charge. -- Tony Perry
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1996 | DON HECKMAN
James Carter very nearly goes over the top on this one. The potential, always present in this superbly talented young saxophonist, of permitting his ebullient articulateness to distract him from concentrating on developing ideas almost overpowers a few of the tracks. The album concept--a good one--was to pair the historically enlightened Carter with a number of his noble predecessors.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1995 | Don Heckman, Don Heckman is The Times' jazz writer.
James Carter, described by Rolling Stone as "the most exciting young saxophonist to arrive on the scene in the past 25 years," has never played a saxophone he didn't like. And he's got several rooms full of gleaming instruments to prove it. Carter's New York apartment is bursting at the seams with at least one example of nearly every variation of the versatile instrument devised by Belgian Adolphe Sax in the mid-19th Century--from the tiny sopranino to the elephantine bass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2009 | Tony Perry
A San Diego grand jury has indicted a gang member in connection with a 2003 shooting that killed two women and wounded a 7-year-old boy on their way home from church. James Carter, 35, a member of the Skyline gang, has been indicted on two counts of murder, four counts of attempted murder and conspiracy to commit murder. He is in jail on an unrelated robbery charge. -- Tony Perry
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1995 | Don Heckman
JAMES CARTER, "Jurassic Classics" ( DIW/Columbia )*** JAMES CARTER, "The Real Quietstorm" ( Atlantic )*** Let's put it as directly as possible. James Carter has the potential to be the most influential jazz saxophonist of the decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If there was any single note James Carter missed on any of his three burnished gold saxophones during his opening night at Catalina Bar & Grill on Tuesday, it's hard to imagine what it could have been. Notes were flying around with such abandon that there were times when Carter came close to overwhelming the sound and presence of his four musical associates--alto saxophonist Cassius Richmond, pianist Craig Taborn, bassist Jaribu Shahid and drummer Leonard King.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's no denying the sheer musical ability of saxophonist James Carter, who opened a six-night run at Catalina Bar & Grill Tuesday night. Performing on four different instruments--clarinet and soprano, alto and tenor saxophones--Carter's technical skills were astounding. In the first number alone, a soprano saxophone romp through Don Byas' "1944 Stomp," he wrenched every sound imaginable out of the instrument.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2007 | Nancy Wride, Times Staff Writer
A soldier is all that Army Sgt. Lawrance James Carter wanted to be while growing up in Upland. It was a family tradition. His mother, father, uncle and grandfather had all been Marines. His stepfather was an Army Green Beret, and his brother is in the Army. When Carter enlisted in June 2001, he asked the Army to train him for combat. It was like anything important to him, family and friends said: He did it full-tilt. He didn't just buy a car; he tricked out his midnight blue Honda Civic.
NEWS
April 1, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
James Carter can play just about anything he wants on a saxophone. Brilliantly virtuosic, he is a master of soprano, alto, tenor and baritone saxophones, someone who can capture the natural timbre and character of each. So it was hard to understand why -- in his performance Tuesday at the Jazz Bakery -- Carter remained within such a narrow range of expression.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2003 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
James Carter, who led a Mississippi chain gang in singing a work song that was recorded by a famed musicologist and, 40 years later, became part of the top-selling "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" soundtrack album, has died. He was 77. Carter, who had been in poor health and suffered a stroke, died Nov. 26 in a hospital in Oak Park, Ill. The son of a Mississippi sharecropper, Carter served in the Navy during World War II.
NEWS
February 13, 2003 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
When James Carter prepares for any border crossing, he seldom travels light. This time around, the jazz world's multi-woodwind demon has but three cases in ascending sizes -- soprano sax, tenor sax and bass clarinet -- strewn about his Culver City hotel room. He's just a couple of hours into town, and it's only a couple more before he kicks off a week of shows with his organ trio (Leonard King on drums and Gerald Gibbs on the funky Hammond B3) at the Jazz Bakery just down the way.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2002 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Whether you're stuck in traffic on the 405 Freeway or visiting an art exhibition that doesn't seem to make sense, a little patience goes a long way. Nowhere is this truer than at the Santa Monica Museum of Art, whose walls have been covered with computer-printed diagrams, hand-drawn flow charts, neatly typed explanations, complicated physics equations and photographic illustrations.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is The Times' jazz writer
James Carter has been able to do almost anything he chooses with a saxophone since his very first recordings. He is fluent not just on alto, tenor and soprano, but on some of the instrument's more rarely heard manifestations--bass saxophone, for example--so there has never been any doubt about his virtuosic technical skills. There has, however, been some question regarding his capacity to find an artistic center, on recordings as well as in performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1995 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The past, the present and, just maybe, the future of jazz walked onstage at Catalina Bar & Grill Monday night carrying a bunch of saxophones and the heavy weight of expectation. His name is James Carter, and he has been described almost universally as the next great saxophonist. It's an onerous burden that Carter has thus far carried with dignity, responsibility and enthusiasm.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is The Times' jazz writer
James Carter has been able to do almost anything he chooses with a saxophone since his very first recordings. He is fluent not just on alto, tenor and soprano, but on some of the instrument's more rarely heard manifestations--bass saxophone, for example--so there has never been any doubt about his virtuosic technical skills. There has, however, been some question regarding his capacity to find an artistic center, on recordings as well as in performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If there was any single note James Carter missed on any of his three burnished gold saxophones during his opening night at Catalina Bar & Grill on Tuesday, it's hard to imagine what it could have been. Notes were flying around with such abandon that there were times when Carter came close to overwhelming the sound and presence of his four musical associates--alto saxophonist Cassius Richmond, pianist Craig Taborn, bassist Jaribu Shahid and drummer Leonard King.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's no denying the sheer musical ability of saxophonist James Carter, who opened a six-night run at Catalina Bar & Grill Tuesday night. Performing on four different instruments--clarinet and soprano, alto and tenor saxophones--Carter's technical skills were astounding. In the first number alone, a soprano saxophone romp through Don Byas' "1944 Stomp," he wrenched every sound imaginable out of the instrument.
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