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James Carton

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BUSINESS
October 3, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
A federal district court judge in Los Angeles on Monday rejected Litton Industries' claim that a 1986 "whistle-blower" law is unconstitutional, paving the way for a massive civil fraud case against the defense contractor to go forward. U.S. District Judge Mariana R.
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BUSINESS
July 15, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In one of the largest whistle-blower settlements in history, Beverly Hills-based Litton Industries agreed Thursday to pay $82 million to resolve allegations it overcharged the government for computer work on defense contracts, vindicating a former employee who did not live to see his courage bear fruit.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department disclosed Wednesday that it will take over prosecution of a private "whistle-blower" lawsuit accusing a Litton Industries subsidiary of overcharging the government by at least $25 million for computer work on hundreds of defense contracts. The lawsuit, ordered unsealed Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Matthew M. Byrne Jr.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
A federal district court judge in Los Angeles on Monday rejected Litton Industries' claim that a 1986 "whistle-blower" law is unconstitutional, paving the way for a massive civil fraud case against the defense contractor to go forward. U.S. District Judge Mariana R.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In one of the largest whistle-blower settlements in history, Beverly Hills-based Litton Industries agreed Thursday to pay $82 million to resolve allegations it overcharged the government for computer work on defense contracts, vindicating a former employee who did not live to see his courage bear fruit.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1989 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
James Carton didn't immediately suspect his employer of fraud. He figured there was a reasonable explanation for the inconsistencies he had discovered in the accounting records of a Litton Systems data center in Woodland Hills. While working on an in-house project in early 1986, he alleges in a lawsuit he later filed against the company, Carton noticed that the company's software system looked like it was designed to underrecord the computer usage of Litton's commercial clients, which caused the government to be overcharged for the same type of service.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1989 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
James Carton did not immediately suspect his employer of fraud. He figured that there was a reasonable explanation for the inconsistencies that he had discovered in the accounting records of a Litton Systems data center in Woodland Hills. While working on an in-house project in early 1986, he alleges in a lawsuit he later filed against the company, Carton noticed that the company's software system looked as though it was designed to under-record the computer usage of Litton's commercial clients, which caused the government to be overcharged for the same type of service.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge in Los Angeles said Monday that a unit of Litton Industries illegally shifted computer costs to military accounts, handing the company a major setback in its effort to fend off a $500-million whistle-blower lawsuit. U.S. District Judge Mariana R. Pfaelzer found that the cost accounting system used by Litton Systems Inc. of Woodland Hills was illegal under federal procurement laws. The ruling to define issues in the case was issued Thursday and made public Monday.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1989 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
James Carton didn't immediately suspect his employer of fraud. He figured there was a reasonable explanation for the inconsistencies he had discovered in the accounting records of a Litton Systems data center in Woodland Hills. While working on an in-house project in early 1986, he alleges in a lawsuit he later filed against the company, Carton noticed that the company's software system looked like it was designed to underrecord the computer usage of Litton's commercial clients, which caused the government to be overcharged for the same type of service.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1989 | GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writer
James Carton did not immediately suspect his employer of fraud. He figured that there was a reasonable explanation for the inconsistencies that he had discovered in the accounting records of a Litton Systems data center in Woodland Hills. While working on an in-house project in early 1986, he alleges in a lawsuit he later filed against the company, Carton noticed that the company's software system looked as though it was designed to under-record the computer usage of Litton's commercial clients, which caused the government to be overcharged for the same type of service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department disclosed Wednesday that it will take over prosecution of a private "whistle-blower" lawsuit accusing a Litton Industries subsidiary of overcharging the government by at least $25 million for computer work on hundreds of defense contracts. The lawsuit, ordered unsealed Wednesday by U.S. District Judge Matthew M. Byrne Jr.
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