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James Casebere

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2000 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is a regular contributor to Calendar
The hallway is flooded at Phillips Academy, one of America's oldest and most exclusive private schools, in Andover, Mass. The silvery surface of the water contrasts with the pale pink color of the walls and the delicate neoclassical moldings over the classroom doors. Four-by-5-foot photographs capture this eerie scene, one that is entirely invented by artist James Casebere.
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NEWS
August 22, 2002
* James Casebere (Grant Selwyn Fine Art, 341 N. Canon Drive, Beverly Hills, [310] 777-2400). Photography by Casebere includes "Green Staircase #1," left, a digital chromogenic print mounted to plexiglass. Ends on Sept. 7.
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NEWS
August 22, 2002
* James Casebere (Grant Selwyn Fine Art, 341 N. Canon Drive, Beverly Hills, [310] 777-2400). Photography by Casebere includes "Green Staircase #1," left, a digital chromogenic print mounted to plexiglass. Ends on Sept. 7.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2002 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Warnings, perhaps. Images gleaned from collective memory. Seductive fictions. James Casebere's extraordinary new photographs at Grant Selwyn Fine Arts ride their multiplicity with grace. They are gorgeous, but at the same time, disquieting. They reference history, but with tremendous sensual immediacy. "From the beginning," Casebere has said, "I had a tendency to conflate personal and social history--or psychological and political content."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2002 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Warnings, perhaps. Images gleaned from collective memory. Seductive fictions. James Casebere's extraordinary new photographs at Grant Selwyn Fine Arts ride their multiplicity with grace. They are gorgeous, but at the same time, disquieting. They reference history, but with tremendous sensual immediacy. "From the beginning," Casebere has said, "I had a tendency to conflate personal and social history--or psychological and political content."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1990 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Casebere is one of a generation of photographers whose work eschews fact for fiction. Sculptors and dramatists as much as photo-technicians, these artists apparently have been influenced more by the narratives of film and television than still photography. The larger-than-life glossies of one-shot dramas by Casebere, Cindy Sherman, Nic Nicosia, Laurie Simmons and a slew of other artists in their mid-to-late 30s and early 40s first came to light during the early 1980s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1990 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, SAN DIEGO COUNTY ARTS EDITOR
James Casebere is one of a generation of photographers whose work eschews fact for fiction. Sculptors and dramatists as much as photo-technicians, these artists apparently have been influenced more by the narratives of film and television than still photography. The larger-than-life glossies of one-shot dramas by Casebere, Cindy Sherman, Nic Nicosia, Laurie Simmons and a slew of other artists in their mid-to-late 30s and early 40s first came to light during the early 1980s.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1991 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, SAN DIEGO COUNTY ARTS EDITOR
Among the county's art museums, none had a better year than the Museum of Photographic Arts in Balboa Park. The year opened with the last few days of "Los Vecinos (The Neighbors)," an ambitious and auspicious showing of art about the border region. And the year ended with one of the institution's most impressive exhibitions to date: "The Duane Michals Show," a retrospective of one of this country's more off-beat, introspective and provocatively narrative contemporary photographers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
It's the edge between comforting toyland and slightly scary dream spaces that gives James Casebere's photographs their clout. He builds all-white tableaux of wood, cardboard and plaster, then lights them evocatively and clicks. The results are black-and-white pictures crowded with objects--from masses of "Watertoys" to rock formations emulating Arches National Monument or a Mexican "Street With Pots."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1985 | COLIN GARDNER
An important contribution of Post-Modernism to photography has been the breakdown of the medium's traditional role as a simple documentor of reality. Artists have now introduced the idea of the simulacrum, an artificial and vague semblance that has more to do with the fantasy of theater than with creating a true copy of nature.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2000 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is a regular contributor to Calendar
The hallway is flooded at Phillips Academy, one of America's oldest and most exclusive private schools, in Andover, Mass. The silvery surface of the water contrasts with the pale pink color of the walls and the delicate neoclassical moldings over the classroom doors. Four-by-5-foot photographs capture this eerie scene, one that is entirely invented by artist James Casebere.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1990 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Casebere is one of a generation of photographers whose work eschews fact for fiction. Sculptors and dramatists as much as photo-technicians, these artists apparently have been influenced more by the narratives of film and television than still photography. The larger-than-life glossies of one-shot dramas by Casebere, Cindy Sherman, Nic Nicosia, Laurie Simmons and a slew of other artists in their mid-to-late 30s and early 40s first came to light during the early 1980s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1990 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, SAN DIEGO COUNTY ARTS EDITOR
James Casebere is one of a generation of photographers whose work eschews fact for fiction. Sculptors and dramatists as much as photo-technicians, these artists apparently have been influenced more by the narratives of film and television than still photography. The larger-than-life glossies of one-shot dramas by Casebere, Cindy Sherman, Nic Nicosia, Laurie Simmons and a slew of other artists in their mid-to-late 30s and early 40s first came to light during the early 1980s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1988 | LEAH OLLMAN
Part II of the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art's exhibition of works from its collection mirrors art's refreshing break from the dry days of minimalism recalled in Part I. All the humor, pathos, passion and even exuberance that were unwelcome during minimalism's reign pour out here with the dizzying pleasure of a breath released after long captivity.
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