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NEWS
June 19, 1989
Mississippi Atty. Gen. Mike Moore said he may reopen the 25-year-old case of three civil rights workers whose slayings inspired the movie "Mississippi Burning." Moore said he is reading the 2,800-page transcript of the federal trial of 19 men on civil rights charges and is trying to talk to some witnesses. "The first hurdle we have to jump is whether the evidence is enough to successfully prosecute," Moore said recently. "Second, is it in the best interests of the people of this state?"
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2013 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Olen Burrage, a farmer and Ku Klux Klan member who owned the Mississippi land where the bullet-riddled bodies of three civil rights workers were found buried in the 1960s, has died. He was 82. Burrage, who was acquitted on civil rights charges related to the murders, died March 15 at a medical center in Meridian, Miss., the McClain-Hays Funeral Home announced. The cause was not released. The Ku Klux Klan slaying became one of the most infamous episodes of the civil rights era and led to the 1965 passage of the Voting Rights Act, which outlawed discriminatory practices that kept African Americans from voting.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY
The Hollywood types flew into Meridian, Miss., to soak up local color for their movie. Naturally, they had to meet Lawrence Rainey, the old-time sheriff. He always seemed to be in the action around Neshoba County.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Neshoba" is a troubling documentary, a film about fiery passions and murderous deeds that is disturbing in ways that go beyond what might be expected. Neshoba is a county in Mississippi where, on a June night in 1964, one of the events that defined the struggle for racial equality in the South took place. A trio of civil rights workers — James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner — were murdered by members of the Ku Klux Klan, their bodies found days later, buried in an earthen dam and exhibiting signs of torture and premature burial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2013 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Olen Burrage, a farmer and Ku Klux Klan member who owned the Mississippi land where the bullet-riddled bodies of three civil rights workers were found buried in the 1960s, has died. He was 82. Burrage, who was acquitted on civil rights charges related to the murders, died March 15 at a medical center in Meridian, Miss., the McClain-Hays Funeral Home announced. The cause was not released. The Ku Klux Klan slaying became one of the most infamous episodes of the civil rights era and led to the 1965 passage of the Voting Rights Act, which outlawed discriminatory practices that kept African Americans from voting.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Neshoba" is a troubling documentary, a film about fiery passions and murderous deeds that is disturbing in ways that go beyond what might be expected. Neshoba is a county in Mississippi where, on a June night in 1964, one of the events that defined the struggle for racial equality in the South took place. A trio of civil rights workers — James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner — were murdered by members of the Ku Klux Klan, their bodies found days later, buried in an earthen dam and exhibiting signs of torture and premature burial.
NATIONAL
November 18, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A former Ku Klux Klan leader convicted of manslaughter for orchestrating the 1964 slayings of three civil rights workers has again been denied bond while he appeals his case. Edgar Ray Killen, 80, was convicted of three counts of manslaughter June 21 -- exactly 41 years after James Chaney, Michael Schwerner and Andrew Goodman were killed while working in Neshoba County to register black voters.
NATIONAL
July 15, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Neshoba County Circuit Judge Marcus D. Gordon refused to release Edgar Ray Killen from prison while the former Ku Klux Klan leader appeals his conviction in the 1964 killing of three civil rights workers. Killen, 81, was convicted of manslaughter in June 2005 in the slayings of James Chaney, Michael Schwerner and Andrew Goodman. He was sentenced to 60 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Jim Ingram, a retired FBI agent who investigated Ku Klux Klan killings and violent acts across Mississippi in the 1960s, died of pancreatic cancer Sunday at a Jackson, Miss., hospice. He was 77. Ingram worked on many high-profile cases, including the "Mississippi Burning" slayings of civil rights workers James Chaney, Michael Schwerner and Andrew Goodman in June 1964. -- news.obits@latimes.com
NATIONAL
March 5, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge in Philadelphia upheld murder charges against a suspected Ku Klux Klansman in the 1964 slayings of three civil rights workers, clearing the way for a trial next month. Circuit Court Judge Marcus Gordon rejected a defense motion that the case against Edgar Ray Killen be dismissed on the grounds he had been denied his constitutional right to a fair and speedy trial.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY
The Hollywood types flew into Meridian, Miss., to soak up local color for their movie. Naturally, they had to meet Lawrence Rainey, the old-time sheriff. He always seemed to be in the action around Neshoba County.
NEWS
June 19, 1989
Mississippi Atty. Gen. Mike Moore said he may reopen the 25-year-old case of three civil rights workers whose slayings inspired the movie "Mississippi Burning." Moore said he is reading the 2,800-page transcript of the federal trial of 19 men on civil rights charges and is trying to talk to some witnesses. "The first hurdle we have to jump is whether the evidence is enough to successfully prosecute," Moore said recently. "Second, is it in the best interests of the people of this state?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Louise Hermey Stanford, 62, the volunteer who sounded the alarm when three civil rights workers disappeared in Mississippi in 1964, died of complications of breast cancer Oct. 18 in Lampasas, Texas. The slayings of the civil rights workers, James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner, shocked the nation. The events were dramatized in the 1988 motion picture "Mississippi Burning."
NATIONAL
August 16, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Federal authorities will continue to investigate the 1964 Mississippi killings of three civil rights workers, a case that helped pass landmark legislation, despite the death of a key suspect, the Justice Department says. Billy Wayne Posey, 73, died Thursday. Federal investigators were looking into his possible involvement in the June 21, 1964, killings of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner, who had been working to register black voters. Posey's funeral was Saturday in Philadelphia, Miss.
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