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James Clavell

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NEWS
September 8, 1994 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Clavell, prolific author of epic best-selling novels such as "Shogun" and "Noble House" which were usually reincarnated on the small or silver screen, has died. He was 69. Clavell died Tuesday at his home in Vevey, Switzerland. His American publishers said he had suffered from cancer, and his British publishers said he had also had a stroke. Although Clavell began his career as a screenwriter and director, he found his literary niche in thick novels.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By David Colker
Screenwriter Eric Bercovici knew he was not the first choice to adapt "Shogun," the blockbuster 1975 novel by James Clavell about an English seaman marooned in 17th century Japan. Bercovici, who worked on the Paramount lot, read the novel anyway. "I knew right away how to adapt it," he said in a 1981 Los Angeles Times interview. "But damned if I would tell them. " Other writers fell by the wayside, and he was called to meet with Clavell, who had creative control over a proposed TV miniseries based on the book.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1991 | KARI GRANVILLE, Kari Granville is a free - lance arts writer based in New York. and
Looking back, it seemed like a can't-miss idea. "Shogun," James Clavell's romantic yarn about an English sea captain marooned in feudal Japan, had a proven allure, first to readers of the international best seller, then to television viewers as an NBC miniseries. Wouldn't it make a smash musical? Eight years and several million dollars later, that idea finally made it to Broadway. It lasted less than 100 days and closed last Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
O.J. Simpson is back on the run, thanks to Fox. Fox and FX Productions are developing a movie based on Simpson's murder trial as part of its long-form "event" slate. "The Run of His Life: The People v. O.J. Simpson" will be based on legal journalist Jeffrey Toobin's book of the same name. Also planned is a new version of "Shogun," based on the novel by James Clavell, which will revolve around the brutal world of feudal Japan. "Shogun" was produced as a 10-part miniseries for NBC in 1980.
NEWS
May 8, 1994
Concerning your Reruns to Rewatch (TV Times, April 17): James Michener and James Clavell do have the same first names, and they both write historical fiction, but "Shogun" was written by Clavell, not Michener. A small error, but for James Michener and James Clavell fans, an important fact. Bob Zhe, Westminster
NEWS
March 13, 1988
A resounding bravo and thank you to James Clavell for "Noble House." The casting, locale, story and acting (Pierce Brosnan made a handsome and powerfully effective tai-pan ) were perfect. The obvious determination and dedication on Clavell's part to present his novel accurately were much appreciated and truly enjoyed by our family. We were glued to our television set all four nights and hated to see the miniseries end. C. DeRose, San Fernando
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
O.J. Simpson is back on the run, thanks to Fox. Fox and FX Productions are developing a movie based on Simpson's murder trial as part of its long-form "event" slate. "The Run of His Life: The People v. O.J. Simpson" will be based on legal journalist Jeffrey Toobin's book of the same name. Also planned is a new version of "Shogun," based on the novel by James Clavell, which will revolve around the brutal world of feudal Japan. "Shogun" was produced as a 10-part miniseries for NBC in 1980.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1987 | John M. Wilson
James Clavell reaped a record $5-million advance from William Morrow and Avon for "Whirlwind" (17 weeks so far on the N.Y. Times best-seller list), will probably make another fortune from a future film or TV deal--and his name's famous worldwide. But what about the editor specially assigned by Morrow to supervise the rewrite that made the blockbuster publishable?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By David Colker
Screenwriter Eric Bercovici knew he was not the first choice to adapt "Shogun," the blockbuster 1975 novel by James Clavell about an English seaman marooned in 17th century Japan. Bercovici, who worked on the Paramount lot, read the novel anyway. "I knew right away how to adapt it," he said in a 1981 Los Angeles Times interview. "But damned if I would tell them. " Other writers fell by the wayside, and he was called to meet with Clavell, who had creative control over a proposed TV miniseries based on the book.
NEWS
December 11, 1986 | ANN MARIE CUNNINGHAM, Cunningham lives in New York. and
Liz and I have a mutual friend we met years ago in Hong Kong, fellow called Marlowe, a writer. He always carried a can (of sardines) with him, iron rations in case of famine. --Whirlwind, Page 1,085. Peter Marlowe is the alter ego ("the best of me") of James Clavell, author of "King Rat," a 1960 best-selling novel based on his experiences as an 18-year-old prisoner during World War II at a Japanese camp in Singapore.
NEWS
September 8, 1994 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Clavell, prolific author of epic best-selling novels such as "Shogun" and "Noble House" which were usually reincarnated on the small or silver screen, has died. He was 69. Clavell died Tuesday at his home in Vevey, Switzerland. His American publishers said he had suffered from cancer, and his British publishers said he had also had a stroke. Although Clavell began his career as a screenwriter and director, he found his literary niche in thick novels.
NEWS
May 8, 1994
Concerning your Reruns to Rewatch (TV Times, April 17): James Michener and James Clavell do have the same first names, and they both write historical fiction, but "Shogun" was written by Clavell, not Michener. A small error, but for James Michener and James Clavell fans, an important fact. Bob Zhe, Westminster
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1991 | KARI GRANVILLE, Kari Granville is a free - lance arts writer based in New York. and
Looking back, it seemed like a can't-miss idea. "Shogun," James Clavell's romantic yarn about an English sea captain marooned in feudal Japan, had a proven allure, first to readers of the international best seller, then to television viewers as an NBC miniseries. Wouldn't it make a smash musical? Eight years and several million dollars later, that idea finally made it to Broadway. It lasted less than 100 days and closed last Sunday.
NEWS
March 13, 1988
A resounding bravo and thank you to James Clavell for "Noble House." The casting, locale, story and acting (Pierce Brosnan made a handsome and powerfully effective tai-pan ) were perfect. The obvious determination and dedication on Clavell's part to present his novel accurately were much appreciated and truly enjoyed by our family. We were glued to our television set all four nights and hated to see the miniseries end. C. DeRose, San Fernando
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1987 | John M. Wilson
James Clavell reaped a record $5-million advance from William Morrow and Avon for "Whirlwind" (17 weeks so far on the N.Y. Times best-seller list), will probably make another fortune from a future film or TV deal--and his name's famous worldwide. But what about the editor specially assigned by Morrow to supervise the rewrite that made the blockbuster publishable?
NEWS
December 11, 1986 | ANN MARIE CUNNINGHAM, Cunningham lives in New York. and
Liz and I have a mutual friend we met years ago in Hong Kong, fellow called Marlowe, a writer. He always carried a can (of sardines) with him, iron rations in case of famine. --Whirlwind, Page 1,085. Peter Marlowe is the alter ego ("the best of me") of James Clavell, author of "King Rat," a 1960 best-selling novel based on his experiences as an 18-year-old prisoner during World War II at a Japanese camp in Singapore.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
'Shogun' Killed: The big-budget Broadway show "Shogun, the Musical" posted closing notices Tuesday night at the Marquis Theatre. Final performances will be Sunday, according to a spokesman for the show at Shirley Herz & Associates. The $6-million musical--based on James Clavell's international bestseller and the 1980 NBC hit miniseries--suffered from mixed reviews after opening Nov. 20.
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