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James Clifford

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SPORTS
April 5, 1997 | JEFF FLETCHER
First baseman James Clifford came bouncing into the clubhouse Friday night with news that wouldn't normally elicit so much excitement. "They're old bone chips!" Clifford said with Christmas-morning glee. It meant the chips that showed up on an X-ray after Clifford was hit by a pitch Thursday night would not sideline him for as long as first feared. Clifford is now day to day.
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SPORTS
July 12, 1997 | BRYAN RODGERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If only JetHawk first baseman James Clifford could have been around a bit longer to enjoy his record-setting night. Clifford, who has been a one-man wrecking crew in games against the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes, pulled up lame while running out a ground ball Friday night in a 6-2 loss in a California League game at the Hangar. Before injuring his right leg in the fifth inning, Clifford was up to his old tricks.
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SPORTS
September 27, 1990 | Associated Press
Washington inside linebacker James Clifford, who led the Pacific 10 in tackles as a sophomore, will miss this season because of a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee. Clifford, who has not played this season, underwent surgery Wednesday at Evergreen Hospital in suburban Kirkland. His knee injury was diagnosed first as a sprain. But arthroscopic surgery was done after he hurt his knee again in practice last Wednesday and the ligament damage was found.
SPORTS
June 20, 1997 | JEFF FLETCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We now rejoin James Clifford where he left off on Sunday. The Lancaster JetHawks first baseman probably thought the California League all-star break couldn't have come at a worse time--just after he had hit three-run homers in consecutive games. But Clifford's bat didn't cool off during the three-day break.
SPORTS
July 21, 1996 | DANA HADDAD
For the first time in his five-year pro career, JetHawk first baseman James Clifford has an everyday job. Clifford, a left-handed hitter who usually plays only against right-handed pitchers, will be the permanent first baseman for the remainder of season because of an ankle injury to Shawn Buhner, his close friend. "I wish it wouldn't have happened this way with Shawn, but I like the chance to play everyday," Clifford said. Clifford, who entered Saturday's game batting .
SPORTS
July 12, 1997 | BRYAN RODGERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If only JetHawk first baseman James Clifford could have been around a bit longer to enjoy his record-setting night. Clifford, who has been a one-man wrecking crew in games against the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes, pulled up lame while running out a ground ball Friday night in a 6-2 loss in a California League game at the Hangar. Before injuring his right leg in the fifth inning, Clifford was up to his old tricks.
SPORTS
June 12, 1996 | JEFF FLETCHER
Fewer than 90 minutes before Tuesday night's game, Manager Dave Brundage put all-star center fielder Marcus Sturdivant back in the lineup. Sturdivant originally was scratched because of a bruised right knee he suffered diving for a fly ball on Monday. "I just thought, shoot, I know he's hurt, but this is the biggest game of the year," Brundage said. "He said he was fine. He was out here taking early hitting and taking infield."
SPORTS
August 23, 1996 | MIKE BRESNAHAN
It's late August. While the JetHawks are chasing a playoff spot, the University of Washington is conducting summer football practice. They each mean something to James Clifford. Clifford was an inside linebacker for the Huskies and played on the 1991 national championship team his senior year. As a sophomore, he led the Pac-10 in tackles. Now he's a first baseman for the JetHawks.
SPORTS
June 20, 1997 | JEFF FLETCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We now rejoin James Clifford where he left off on Sunday. The Lancaster JetHawks first baseman probably thought the California League all-star break couldn't have come at a worse time--just after he had hit three-run homers in consecutive games. But Clifford's bat didn't cool off during the three-day break.
SPORTS
May 29, 1996 | JEFF FLETCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stepping to the plate, James Clifford scowls at the pitcher and waves the bat like Popeye swinging a toothpick, purple uniform sleeves stretched tightly around beefy biceps. The 6-foot-2, 215-pound JetHawk first baseman is a hanging curveball's worst nightmare. Which is good news for the running backs of the world, because he used to spend his time trying to knock them over fences too.
SPORTS
April 5, 1997 | JEFF FLETCHER
First baseman James Clifford came bouncing into the clubhouse Friday night with news that wouldn't normally elicit so much excitement. "They're old bone chips!" Clifford said with Christmas-morning glee. It meant the chips that showed up on an X-ray after Clifford was hit by a pitch Thursday night would not sideline him for as long as first feared. Clifford is now day to day.
SPORTS
August 23, 1996 | MIKE BRESNAHAN
It's late August. While the JetHawks are chasing a playoff spot, the University of Washington is conducting summer football practice. They each mean something to James Clifford. Clifford was an inside linebacker for the Huskies and played on the 1991 national championship team his senior year. As a sophomore, he led the Pac-10 in tackles. Now he's a first baseman for the JetHawks.
SPORTS
July 21, 1996 | DANA HADDAD
For the first time in his five-year pro career, JetHawk first baseman James Clifford has an everyday job. Clifford, a left-handed hitter who usually plays only against right-handed pitchers, will be the permanent first baseman for the remainder of season because of an ankle injury to Shawn Buhner, his close friend. "I wish it wouldn't have happened this way with Shawn, but I like the chance to play everyday," Clifford said. Clifford, who entered Saturday's game batting .
SPORTS
June 12, 1996 | JEFF FLETCHER
Fewer than 90 minutes before Tuesday night's game, Manager Dave Brundage put all-star center fielder Marcus Sturdivant back in the lineup. Sturdivant originally was scratched because of a bruised right knee he suffered diving for a fly ball on Monday. "I just thought, shoot, I know he's hurt, but this is the biggest game of the year," Brundage said. "He said he was fine. He was out here taking early hitting and taking infield."
SPORTS
May 29, 1996 | JEFF FLETCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stepping to the plate, James Clifford scowls at the pitcher and waves the bat like Popeye swinging a toothpick, purple uniform sleeves stretched tightly around beefy biceps. The 6-foot-2, 215-pound JetHawk first baseman is a hanging curveball's worst nightmare. Which is good news for the running backs of the world, because he used to spend his time trying to knock them over fences too.
SPORTS
September 27, 1990 | Associated Press
Washington inside linebacker James Clifford, who led the Pacific 10 in tackles as a sophomore, will miss this season because of a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee. Clifford, who has not played this season, underwent surgery Wednesday at Evergreen Hospital in suburban Kirkland. His knee injury was diagnosed first as a sprain. But arthroscopic surgery was done after he hurt his knee again in practice last Wednesday and the ligament damage was found.
SPORTS
January 2, 1993 | SHAV GLICK
Tyrone Wheatley is a former Michigan state high school champion in the 100 meters, long jump and high hurdles, but Washington players said it was his size that made him so difficult to tackle. "He's not just a fast back, he's big and strong, too," linebacker James Clifford said. "It was frustrating trying to bring him down; he is a great back. He has incredible speed and he weighs 230 pounds. With the pads, he's about 250. I haven't seen any back with that much power and speed."
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | Reuters
A teen-ager with white supremacist ties has been sentenced to 75 years in prison for racial attacks on six Japanese students in a city park last year. Under the sentence, handed down Thursday, James Clifford Close Jr., 19, will not be eligible for parole until he is 54. Close was found guilty of second-degree assault, ethnic intimidation, aggravated robbery and other crimes. He was acquitted of attempted first-degree murder.
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