Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJames Comey
IN THE NEWS

James Comey

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - James B. Comey was confirmed as the seventh director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation Monday, ending what had been a rare filibuster against a nominee to head the agency. With the 93-1 vote, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) became the first senator to vote against any FBI director nominee since it became a Senate-approved post in 1968. Sens. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) both voted "present. " Comey, the former No. 2 official at the Justice Department under President George W. Bush, was tapped in June by President Obama to replace Robert S. Mueller III, whose term of 12 years expires in September.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
September 19, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Video taken inside Building 197 at the Washington Navy Yard shows Aaron Alexis "calmly" walking down the hallways and stepping into offices, firing indiscriminately at workers and reloading his shotgun with shells from the pockets of his black cargo pants, the FBI chief said Thursday. The video, described by FBI Director James B. Comey, makes clear, he said, that the 34-year-old civilian contractor was not targeting any specific individuals Monday but rather was intent on killing as many people as possible, even shooting a security guard and grabbing his weapon to continue the rampage.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
May 30, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Joseph Tanfani and David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Twenty years ago, James B. Comey was a young federal prosecutor in New York trying to put two Gambino brothers away for life. They were charged with murder, selling drugs, money laundering, racketeering - "the whole kitchen sink," recalled Patrick J. Fitzgerald, Comey's partner on the case. Fitzgerald was a young prosecutor back then too, and, like Comey, he also would make a name for himself in the years ahead as a crusading attorney in the Justice Department. But in 1993 they were just a pair of rather green prosecutors taking on two top "capos" in one of the nation's most notorious Mafia families.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - James B. Comey was confirmed as the seventh director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation Monday, ending what had been a rare filibuster against a nominee to head the agency. With the 93-1 vote, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) became the first senator to vote against any FBI director nominee since it became a Senate-approved post in 1968. Sens. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) both voted "present. " Comey, the former No. 2 official at the Justice Department under President George W. Bush, was tapped in June by President Obama to replace Robert S. Mueller III, whose term of 12 years expires in September.
NATIONAL
May 4, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
A former high-ranking Justice Department official offered praise Thursday for most of the U.S. attorneys who were fired last year, saying he considered some of them to be among the department's most able prosecutors. James B. Comey, who served as deputy attorney general from 2003 until 2005, often contradicted the White House and the Justice Department, which have said the eight U.S. attorneys were fired for performance reasons.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2013 | By David G. Savage and Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama plans to nominate James B. Comey, a former senior Justice Department official who famously challenged a secret eavesdropping program during the George W. Bush administration, to replace Robert S. Mueller III as director of the FBI, officials said Wednesday. Comey, 52, threatened to resign as deputy attorney general rather than give his consent to the secret interception of international calls routed through the United States. Bush had authorized the domestic surveillance effort after the terrorist attacks of Sept.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2003 | Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writer
When James Comey was a young prosecutor, one of his toughest cases was proving that a crime didn't happen. Two Manhattan furriers had claimed their third-floor warehouse was cleaned out in a brazen daytime robbery, and Comey had to show they concocted the story to bilk their insurer. He borrowed thousands of furs from other Manhattan dealers, removed the courtroom's spectator benches overnight and arrayed a vast inventory of furs around the court.
NATIONAL
September 19, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Video taken inside Building 197 at the Washington Navy Yard shows Aaron Alexis "calmly" walking down the hallways and stepping into offices, firing indiscriminately at workers and reloading his shotgun with shells from the pockets of his black cargo pants, the FBI chief said Thursday. The video, described by FBI Director James B. Comey, makes clear, he said, that the 34-year-old civilian contractor was not targeting any specific individuals Monday but rather was intent on killing as many people as possible, even shooting a security guard and grabbing his weapon to continue the rampage.
OPINION
July 16, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
James B. Comey Jr., President Obama's nominee to head the Federal Bureau of Investigation, has an ideal resume for the position - he served as a federal prosecutor and deputy attorney general - and the fact that he served in a Republican administration adds a desirable aspect of bipartisanship to the nomination. Although the FBI director is a presidential appointee, Congress has decided that he should be more insulated from politics than the typical executive branch official. That's why the director serves a 10-year term that overlaps presidential administrations.
NATIONAL
July 9, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - James B. Comey Jr., nominated to become the nation's seventh director of the FBI, conceded Tuesday that he signed a controversial memo allowing waterboarding but said he first lobbied hard to have the policy toned down. Comey, who is facing confirmation hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee, has been hailed by some as a hero for blocking, at least temporarily, a White House surveillance program during his time as deputy attorney general under President George W. Bush.
OPINION
July 16, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
James B. Comey Jr., President Obama's nominee to head the Federal Bureau of Investigation, has an ideal resume for the position - he served as a federal prosecutor and deputy attorney general - and the fact that he served in a Republican administration adds a desirable aspect of bipartisanship to the nomination. Although the FBI director is a presidential appointee, Congress has decided that he should be more insulated from politics than the typical executive branch official. That's why the director serves a 10-year term that overlaps presidential administrations.
NATIONAL
July 9, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - James B. Comey Jr., nominated to become the nation's seventh director of the FBI, conceded Tuesday that he signed a controversial memo allowing waterboarding but said he first lobbied hard to have the policy toned down. Comey, who is facing confirmation hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee, has been hailed by some as a hero for blocking, at least temporarily, a White House surveillance program during his time as deputy attorney general under President George W. Bush.
NATIONAL
May 30, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Joseph Tanfani and David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Twenty years ago, James B. Comey was a young federal prosecutor in New York trying to put two Gambino brothers away for life. They were charged with murder, selling drugs, money laundering, racketeering - "the whole kitchen sink," recalled Patrick J. Fitzgerald, Comey's partner on the case. Fitzgerald was a young prosecutor back then too, and, like Comey, he also would make a name for himself in the years ahead as a crusading attorney in the Justice Department. But in 1993 they were just a pair of rather green prosecutors taking on two top "capos" in one of the nation's most notorious Mafia families.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2013 | By David G. Savage and Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama plans to nominate James B. Comey, a former senior Justice Department official who famously challenged warrantless eavesdropping under President George W. Bush, to replace Robert S. Mueller III as director of the FBI, officials said Wednesday. For the Obama White House, Comey's Republican credentials and record as a federal prosecutor made him an appealing candidate for the nation's top law enforcement job. By tradition, the FBI director is considered nonpartisan.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2013 | By David G. Savage and Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama plans to nominate James B. Comey, a former senior Justice Department official who famously challenged a secret eavesdropping program during the George W. Bush administration, to replace Robert S. Mueller III as director of the FBI, officials said Wednesday. Comey, 52, threatened to resign as deputy attorney general rather than give his consent to the secret interception of international calls routed through the United States. Bush had authorized the domestic surveillance effort after the terrorist attacks of Sept.
NATIONAL
May 4, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
A former high-ranking Justice Department official offered praise Thursday for most of the U.S. attorneys who were fired last year, saying he considered some of them to be among the department's most able prosecutors. James B. Comey, who served as deputy attorney general from 2003 until 2005, often contradicted the White House and the Justice Department, which have said the eight U.S. attorneys were fired for performance reasons.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2013 | By David G. Savage and Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - President Obama plans to nominate James B. Comey, a former senior Justice Department official who famously challenged warrantless eavesdropping under President George W. Bush, to replace Robert S. Mueller III as director of the FBI, officials said Wednesday. For the Obama White House, Comey's Republican credentials and record as a federal prosecutor made him an appealing candidate for the nation's top law enforcement job. By tradition, the FBI director is considered nonpartisan.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2005 | From Times Wire Report
Deputy Atty. Gen. James Comey, a veteran of terrorism and organized-crime prosecutions, said he would leave his post this fall. Comey, who has been the second in command at the Justice Department since 2003, said he would return to the private sector. He has led the department's corporate fraud task force and spurred the creation of violent-crime impact teams in 20 cities. As an assistant U.S.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2003 | Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writer
When James Comey was a young prosecutor, one of his toughest cases was proving that a crime didn't happen. Two Manhattan furriers had claimed their third-floor warehouse was cleaned out in a brazen daytime robbery, and Comey had to show they concocted the story to bilk their insurer. He borrowed thousands of furs from other Manhattan dealers, removed the courtroom's spectator benches overnight and arrayed a vast inventory of furs around the court.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|