Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJames Conte
IN THE NEWS

James Conte

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
April 16, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
James W. Conte, who co-founded Community Psychiatric Centers and helped build it into one of the nation's largest psychiatric hospital chains, announced Wednesday that he has retired as chief executive and will step down as chairman on Nov. 30. Conte's son, Richard, the president of the Laguna Hills company, will succeed his father as chief executive. Company directors have not yet named a new chairman.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 23, 1992
James W. Conte, chairman of Community Psychiatric Centers, said Friday that he is stepping down and handing over the reins of the company to his son. Richard Conte, 38, takes over immediately as chief executive officer, the company said at its annual stockholders meeting. James Conte said in a statement that he does not need to remain with the company until November, his original retirement date. In addition, 41-year-old Loren B. Shook was appointed president and chief operating officer.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 23, 1992
James W. Conte, chairman of Community Psychiatric Centers, said Friday that he is stepping down and handing over the reins of the company to his son. Richard Conte, 38, takes over immediately as chief executive officer, the company said at its annual stockholders meeting. James Conte said in a statement that he does not need to remain with the company until November, his original retirement date. In addition, 41-year-old Loren B. Shook was appointed president and chief operating officer.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
James W. Conte, who co-founded Community Psychiatric Centers and helped build it into one of the nation's largest psychiatric hospital chains, announced Wednesday that he has retired as chief executive and will step down as chairman on Nov. 30. Conte's son, Richard, the president of the Laguna Hills company, will succeed his father as chief executive. Company directors have not yet named a new chairman.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1992 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the scandal-plagued and financially strapped private psychiatric hospital industry, Community Psychiatric Centers until recently had a reputation both as Mr. Lean and Mr. Clean. Its unbureaucratic management kept costs low, and its marketing staff stayed away from the sensational advertising that tarnished the image of some competitors. But now, allegations of under-staffing at some of its 50 hospitals are hurting the Laguna Hills-based company's relations with patients and doctors.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1989 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Conte checked himself into a Salt Lake City psychiatric hospital Monday night. The 61-year-old company chairman wasn't suffering from depression, exhibiting schizophrenic tendencies or struggling with an eating disorder. He simply wanted to make sure that the sheets were clean, the food was tasty, the nurses were attentive and that everything was being accomplished at the lowest possible cost. The staff at CPC Olympus View Hospital knew from the start that Conte wasn't an average patient.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For many Orange County executives, 1991 was a year when their pay packages came under greater shareholder scrutiny and corporate boards were cautious in handing out cash bonuses and perks. It mirrored a trend statewide of keeping executive compensation in line with a company's financial performance. Of the top 100 county executives on the list of publicly traded companies, one-third of the officers saw their cash compensation remain unchanged or had it reduced.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1991 | LESLIE BERKMAN
Community Psychiatric Centers said Monday that it is extending indefinitely its $1.1-billion unsolicited buyout offer for Charter Medical Corp. of Macon, Ga., in a bid to become the nation's largest provider of psychiatric hospital services. Charter management has refused to enter negotiations with the Laguna Hills-based psychiatric hospital chain. But James Conte, CPC's chief executive, said his company is not giving up.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1991 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six officers of Community Psychiatric Centers Inc., including the chairman and president, recently sold company stock worth more than $13 million in order to repay loans from the company. CPC Chairman James W. Conte said Wednesday that the stock sales by company insiders were done to pay for stock options the officers exercised last year and does not indicate that the managers anticipate any financial problems for the company.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1992 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the scandal-plagued and financially strapped private psychiatric hospital industry, Community Psychiatric Centers until recently had a reputation both as Mr. Lean and Mr. Clean. Its unbureaucratic management kept costs low, and its marketing staff stayed away from the sensational advertising that tarnished the image of some competitors. But now, allegations of under-staffing at some of its 50 hospitals are hurting the Laguna Hills-based company's relations with patients and doctors.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1989 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Conte checked himself into a Salt Lake City psychiatric hospital Monday night. The 61-year-old company chairman wasn't suffering from depression, exhibiting schizophrenic tendencies or struggling with an eating disorder. He simply wanted to make sure that the sheets were clean, the food was tasty, the nurses were attentive and that everything was being accomplished at the lowest possible cost. The staff at CPC Olympus View Hospital knew from the start that Conte wasn't an average patient.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|