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James Cullen

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NEWS
December 8, 1992 | PETER MacPHERSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a wintry Sunday morning when Dr. James Cullen died at his home at age 42. In his last months he had lost 40 pounds. His face was ravaged by Molluscum, a virus that produces a kind of wart. Cytomegalovirus, an opportunistic infection that often strikes the optic nerve, had taken his sight. The day before he died, though, James Cullen was given a small victory in his battle against AIDS.
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NEWS
February 25, 1993 | PETER MacPHERSON
For four years, Dr. James Cullen performed physical examinations for the FBI's San Francisco-based agents and applicants (View, Dec. 8). In August, 1988, the FBI confronted Cullen with information that he had AIDS. Cullen would neither confirm nor deny the information, saying only that he followed all federal guidelines and posed no risk to patients.
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NEWS
February 25, 1993 | PETER MacPHERSON
For four years, Dr. James Cullen performed physical examinations for the FBI's San Francisco-based agents and applicants (View, Dec. 8). In August, 1988, the FBI confronted Cullen with information that he had AIDS. Cullen would neither confirm nor deny the information, saying only that he followed all federal guidelines and posed no risk to patients.
NEWS
December 8, 1992 | PETER MacPHERSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a wintry Sunday morning when Dr. James Cullen died at his home at age 42. In his last months he had lost 40 pounds. His face was ravaged by Molluscum, a virus that produces a kind of wart. Cytomegalovirus, an opportunistic infection that often strikes the optic nerve, had taken his sight. The day before he died, though, James Cullen was given a small victory in his battle against AIDS.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1986 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
An exhibit booth--just the booth, not the people--was once taken hostage by a New York trucking company in a dispute with an air freight firm over an unpaid bill. The kidnaping stunt worked. The panicked company that owned the booth scurried to scrape together something--anything--else for the trade show that was about to open in Washington. Meanwhile, it pleaded for a settlement and, barely in time, the deal was made and the booth set free.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1991
Jim McKay of ABC should be ashamed of himself. It is an embarrassment to see a class guy stumble about like a broadcasting school novice. His handling of the Woodward Handicap (Sept. 15, ABC) was an insult to the viewers as well as to the owner of the winning horse, In Excess. Didn't anyone except the betting public at the track (Belmont Park), who sent him off at even money, prepare for In Excess' win?
SPORTS
September 5, 2004 | Eric Sondheimer
*--* CITY SECTI ON Rk Name, School Ht. Wt. Yr. Comment 1 Erick Garcia, 5-10 205 Sr. Punter with ability Roosevelt 2 Dylan Cohen, 5-11 185 Sr. Two-sport athlete Palisades SOUTH ERN SECTI ON 1 Troy Van Blarcom, 6-3 200 Sr. Committed to USC Orange Lutheran 2 Jimmy Rotstein, 6-1 175 Sr. Made terrific summer Brentwood improvement 3 Durrell Chamorro, 6-1 185 Sr. Accurate with strong Chino leg 4 Jared Strubeck, Rio 5-9 160 Sr. Made nine of 10 Mesa field-goal attempts 5 Randall Reynoso, St. 6-1 185 Sr.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1994 | JOHN LIPPMAN and KATHRYN HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Now that the dust is settling from the five-month battle to take over Paramount Communications Inc., people are asking again: What is John Malone going to do? The ambitious chief executive of Denver-based cable TV giant Tele-Communications Inc. was a leading force behind Barry Diller's bid for Paramount until government regulators said TCI would have to divest itself of its stake in Diller's QVC Network Inc. if it acquired the Hollywood studio.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2005 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
Skirmishing erupted Tuesday over the nomination of Alberto R. Gonzales as attorney general, with Democrats complaining that the White House was withholding memos on his views of prisoner torture, and an unlikely collection of generals and military veterans joining human rights groups in opposition.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1996 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Bell Atlantic Corp. announces its merger with Nynex Corp. today, as expected, there will be plenty of echoes from the announcement earlier this month of SBC Communications Inc.'s acquisition of Pacific Telesis Group. Philadelphia-based Bell Atlantic, a profitable company that has operated in a less regulated environment, is swallowing a poorly managed New York-based Baby Bell operating in a competitive market under tight regulatory oversight.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
There are a few things we should go over on the G.I. Joe front before you lock and load for the nearly two hours of supersonic warfare that is Stephen Sommers' "G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra." First the plot, and this will probably surprise you: Well-equipped bad guys want to take over the world; well-equipped good guys fight back. Cool futuristic machines, weapons and CGI make for lots of excellent exploding and imploding everywhere. You guess who wins. Next. Don't call them G.I. Joes.
NATIONAL
May 15, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
The Obama administration will announce plans today to revive the Bush-era military commission system for prosecuting terrorism suspects, current and former officials said, reversing a campaign pledge to rely instead on federal courts and the traditional military justice system. Word of the decision infuriated human rights groups, which argued that any trials under the system created by President George W. Bush would be widely viewed as tainted.
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