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James Cuno

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2011
James Cuno Age: 60 Previous jobs: Director, Art Institute of Chicago, 2004-2011; director, Harvard University Art Museums, 1991-2003 Education:  Bachelor's degree,  Willamette University, 1973; master's, University of Oregon, 1978, and Harvard, 1980; Ph.D., Harvard, 1985 Recent book: "Who Owns Antiquity? Museums and the Battle over Our Ancient Heritage," 2008
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
On Monday night, the Getty will present its inaugural J. Paul Getty Founder's Award to Harold Williams and Nancy Englander, who have helped lead the J. Paul Getty Trust -- and envision its future -- since 1981. The award will be given out annually to honorees internationally in the areas represented at the Getty -- art, research, conservation, and philanthropy. “It's fitting that the first award should go to the two people who gave intellectual structure and physical form to Mr. Getty's vision,” James Cuno, Getty president and CEO, said in a statement.  “And [two people]
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2011 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
James Cuno, 60, does not consider himself a marathoner. He has finished only one full-length race, the 2009 Chicago Marathon. But he is, in other circles, known for his endurance -- a museum leader who in one job after another has tirelessly and tenaciously worked to improve the reputation of some of this country's great museums, most recently the Art Institute of Chicago. This is also one of the challenges facing him in his new job as the CEO and president of the J. Paul Getty Trust, an organization with a staggering $5.3-billion endowment.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2013 | By David Ng
Artist Wayne Thiebaud has donated an oil painting and a group of six prints to the Laguna Art Museum in Orange County. The gift was made official on Saturday at a museum ceremony where Thiebaud was honored with the California Art Award in recognition of his part in raising the prominence of California art around the world. The donation includes the 2002 oil painting "Jolly Cones," which depicts two upside-down ice-cream cones sporting cartoon faces. A version of the painting appeared on the cover of the New Yorker magazine in 2002.
NEWS
May 9, 2011 | By Jori Finkel
The J. Paul Getty Trust has just announced that James Cuno will become its president and chief executive starting Aug. 1. A respected museum leader and scholar, Cuno has been the director of the Art Institute of Chicago since 2004, where he oversaw the completion of the museum's $280-million Modern wing, designed by Renzo Piano. Before that, he had served as director of the Courtauld Institute of Art and the director of the Harvard Art Museums. Cuno, an expert in 19th century French printmaking, was also director of the Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts at UCLA in the mid-1980s.
OPINION
December 3, 2011 | Patt Morrison
Along the 405 is L.A.'s version of a shining city on the hill -- a castle of culture in all its incarnations. The Getty Trust is more than its collections and museums; it's about worldwide research, preservation and philanthropy. Its new chief, James Cuno, blew in four months ago from the Windy City, where he headed the Art Institute of Chicago and, before that, Harvard's art museums. Cuno regards himself as something of a California kid, spending his teen years at Travis Air Force Base and later heading the Grunwald Center at UCLA.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2011 | By Mike Boehm and Jason Felch, Los Angeles Times
In August, when James Cuno steps into the office with the magnificent eastward-looking panoramic view of L.A. that James Wood had occupied as president of the J. Paul Getty Trust, he'll also step into pretty much the same pay package, according to Getty spokesman Ron Hartwig. Had he lived, Wood, who was found dead of natural causes last June in his Brentwood home, was due to earn $728,000 a year in base pay for fiscal 2011-12, plus a $240,000 annual housing stipend; additionally, he would have received $500,000 in deferred payments this year that had been agreed to when he started in 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2011 | By Jason Felch, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
In naming James Cuno president and chief executive of the J. Paul Getty Trust, its board members surprised many in the art world by choosing a staunch defender of the unfettered acquisition of ancient art to lead an institution that, after a decade of scandals, has all but abandoned the practice. Since 2001, when the Getty's former antiquities curator Marion True was charged in Italy with trafficking in looted art, the Getty has returned dozens of ancient masterpieces it concluded were found through illegal excavations.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By David Ng
The Getty is making a wide selection of art-related images in its digital database available for public use and at no cost. The announcement, which was made on Monday, is part of a Getty-wide move toward open content, according to James Cuno, the organization's president and chief executive officer. Images that fall under the new unrestricted-use guidelines either belong to the Getty or are already in the public domain. Previously, the J. Paul Getty Museum made images available upon request and for a fee, with certain restrictions.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2013 | By David Ng
Artist Wayne Thiebaud has donated an oil painting and a group of six prints to the Laguna Art Museum in Orange County. The gift was made official on Saturday at a museum ceremony where Thiebaud was honored with the California Art Award in recognition of his part in raising the prominence of California art around the world. The donation includes the 2002 oil painting "Jolly Cones," which depicts two upside-down ice-cream cones sporting cartoon faces. A version of the painting appeared on the cover of the New Yorker magazine in 2002.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By David Ng
The Getty is making a wide selection of art-related images in its digital database available for public use and at no cost. The announcement, which was made on Monday, is part of a Getty-wide move toward open content, according to James Cuno, the organization's president and chief executive officer. Images that fall under the new unrestricted-use guidelines either belong to the Getty or are already in the public domain. Previously, the J. Paul Getty Museum made images available upon request and for a fee, with certain restrictions.
OPINION
June 23, 2013
Re "Why arts and humanities matter," Opinion, June 20 James Cuno laments the decline in emphasis on arts and humanities as more students are attracted to hard science and engineering because of a job market that "disproportionately" rewards these fields. I agree that the humanities enrich the human experience and that it is appropriate that an exposure to them is required for all graduates. But Cuno goes far beyond this, asserting that intelligence, passion, imagination and "the ability to connect with others" are all developed specifically by studying the humanities, without which future leaders will be unable to understand "what it is to be human.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2012 | By David Ng
The Getty Museum has added a new partner in its expanding cultural accord with Italy -- the city of Rome. The museum said it has signed a bilateral agreement with Rome's Capitoline Museums to create a framework for the conservation and restoration of artworks as well as future exhibitions and long-term loans. The Capitoline Museums are a group of art and archaeological museums that date to the 15th century. They are among the oldest public art museums in the world. James Cuno, president of the Getty Trust, marked the new partnership with the unveiling of an ancient sculpture titled "Lion Attacking a Horse," which is being loaned to the Getty.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2012 | Mike Boehm
The J. Paul Getty Trust announced Monday that it was cutting 34 jobs in its museum division, with the expected annual savings of $4.3 million to be redirected to art acquisitions. There will be no reductions in the exhibition schedule or public programs, the Getty said, and no cuts to curatorial and art-conservation staffs. "Everything the museum does cascades from its collection," James Cuno, the Getty's president and chief executive, said in an interview. "The stronger the collection one has, the better one can do everything else.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2012 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
The J. Paul Getty Trust, the visual art world's ultimate one-percenter with about $8 billion in net assets, has decided that it can't get by on investment income alone and will begin raising money in earnest to pay for special projects. J. Timothy Child, a fundraiser for the University of Chicago since 1989, will assume the newly created position of vice president of institutional advancement on June 11 - the first time in its 30-year history that the Getty has hired a chief fundraiser.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2012 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
In a move that's both a long-held dream come true and an acquisition with potential for art-world debate, the J. Paul Getty Museum announced Thursday that it has bought "The Italian Comedians," a little-known 18th century painting. Depending on which expert you ask, it is either a rare large canvas by one of France's greatest artists, Jean-Antoine Watteau, or the work of somebody else. Scott Schaefer, the Getty's senior curator of paintings, said that before deciding about a month ago to buy the oil painting from a London art dealer, museum leaders sought opinions from "almost all major Watteau scholars in the world," each of whom had seen the painting in person.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2012 | By David Ng
The Getty Museum has added a new partner in its expanding cultural accord with Italy -- the city of Rome. The museum said it has signed a bilateral agreement with Rome's Capitoline Museums to create a framework for the conservation and restoration of artworks as well as future exhibitions and long-term loans. The Capitoline Museums are a group of art and archaeological museums that date to the 15th century. They are among the oldest public art museums in the world. James Cuno, president of the Getty Trust, marked the new partnership with the unveiling of an ancient sculpture titled "Lion Attacking a Horse," which is being loaned to the Getty.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2012
BOOKS Richard Sparks The choral conductor and co-author of "Along the Cherry Lane" discusses the music industry memoir he penned with father-in-law Milton Okun, the music producer and founder of Cherry Lane Music. Book Soup, 8818 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. 7 p.m. Free. (310) 659-3110. http://www.booksoup.com Norman Lebrecht The author of "Why Mahler? How One Man and Ten Symphonies Changed Our World" will discuss the life, work and legacy of Gustav Mahler. Lebrecht will be joined by Deborah Borda, president and chief executive of the L.A. Philharmonic.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2012 | By Jason Felch, Los Angeles Times
Over the last five years, the J. Paul Getty Museum has earned a reputation as a leading reformer on a topic that has embroiled American museums in scandal for the past decade: the acquisition of recently looted antiquities. After evidence of the museum's longtime participation in the illicit trade was uncovered by Italian and Greek investigators, the Getty agreed to return 49 of its most prized pieces of ancient art, cultivated collaborative relationships with those countries and adopted a strict acquisition policy, setting a standard that has been adopted by museums across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2012
BOOKS Richard Sparks The choral conductor and co-author of "Along the Cherry Lane" discusses the music industry memoir he penned with father-in-law Milton Okun, the music producer and founder of Cherry Lane Music. Book Soup, 8818 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. 7 p.m. Free. (310) 659-3110. http://www.booksoup.com Norman Lebrecht The author of "Why Mahler? How One Man and Ten Symphonies Changed Our World" will discuss the life, work and legacy of Gustav Mahler. Lebrecht will be joined by Deborah Borda, president and chief executive of the L.A. Philharmonic.
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