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James D Cherry

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A prominent UCLA researcher, who wrote an editorial dismissing the likelihood of neurological illness from pertussis vaccines, will publish a clarification noting that he omitted mentioning he is a paid consultant to a vaccine manufacturer. Dr. James D. Cherry, a professor of pediatrics, agreed to the clarification after the Journal of the American Medical Assn. learned that he failed to make the kind of financial disclosure required of journal authors since last October. "Dr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A prominent UCLA researcher, who wrote an editorial dismissing the likelihood of neurological illness from pertussis vaccines, will publish a clarification noting that he omitted mentioning he is a paid consultant to a vaccine manufacturer. Dr. James D. Cherry, a professor of pediatrics, agreed to the clarification after the Journal of the American Medical Assn. learned that he failed to make the kind of financial disclosure required of journal authors since last October. "Dr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2010 | Rong-Gong Lin II
A disturbing theme has emerged in an analysis of all eight cases of California infants who died from whooping cough this year: Despite the patients' multiple visits to clinics and hospitals, doctors typically failed to make a swift, accurate diagnosis. "In several cases … the infants were treated only for nasal congestion or mild upper respiratory infection," Dr. John Talarico, an immunization official with the California Department of Public Health, wrote in a recent letter to healthcare providers statewide.
HEALTH
September 23, 2010
Whooping cough, also known as pertussis, is a bacterial disease that infects the respiratory system. It is most dangerous to infants, particularly those who are too young to be vaccinated. Symptoms: Children and adults suffer from severe coughing, followed by the "whoop" sound made when the person inhales at the end of a coughing spasm. Young infants suffer a runny nose and slight cough but may not make the telltale "whoop" sound. Adults can also experience sweating episodes, severe coughing that worsens at night and a sense of choking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2010 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
California health authorities say that cases of whooping cough reported to the state have more than doubled so far this year — 346 cases from Jan. 1 to April 30, up from 129 cases during the same period last year. Four newborns have died from the disease — two in Los Angeles County and two in the Central Valley. Amid concern that this may be the worst year for whooping cough since a 2005 outbreak killed eight infants in California, health officials are recommending a new strategy to protect babies too young for vaccination.
HEALTH
May 31, 2010 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
Two days after her second son, Dylan, was born in 2005, Mariah Bianchi let out yet another deep-chested cough, this time in the hospital, where she was recovering from the delivery. She had been coughing for two weeks; she had coughed so badly that her contractions started early. A pediatrician checking Dylan heard Bianchi's bark-like cough — and a subsequent whooping sound as she gasped for air. The doctor told Bianchi it sounded like whooping cough, also called pertussis, and urged her to see her own doctor once she left the hospital.
NEWS
July 18, 1989 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Bobbie Seymour was looking forward to the mother-daughter luncheon at her daughter's day-care center--until she saw the food. "The French fries were cold," says Seymour, a Chino Hills mother who works as a clerk-typist. "The hamburger meat was gray. And I was hungry. "Then I thought, maybe this is good compared to what they usually get."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Ralph D. Feigin, the pediatrician who built the Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital into major teaching and research institutions and who wrote the book on children's infectious diseases, died Aug. 14 at The Methodist Hospital in Houston. He was 70. Although he was not a smoker, Feigin had been battling lung cancer for 10 months. He had entered the hospital the previous weekend to undergo an experimental treatment. When Feigin joined Baylor in 1977, the pediatrics department was a backwater with 39 faculty members and federal research funding totaling a mere $355,000 per year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1989 | ANNE C. ROARK, Times Staff Writer
A Santa Monica nurse calls this year's version of the flu the Darth Vader of respiratory diseases. A hospital librarian says it made her sicker than she has been since college. An emergency room doctor in Pasadena says it's the worst she's seen in 13 years. Given all the coughing and misery in Southern California in the last few weeks, it may come as a surprise, particularly to flu sufferers, that there is no epidemic of the disease in Los Angeles this year.
NEWS
July 28, 1992 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
There is a story that Dr. William Schaffner likes to tell his students about the problem of hospital-acquired infections. In the annals of medical detective work, it might be called "The Case of the Streptococci and the Anesthesiologist's Backside." There had been a mysterious outbreak of postoperative wound infections at Schaffner's hospital.
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