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James D Garibaldi

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NEWS
September 11, 1993 | From Associated Press
James D. Garibaldi, the courtly advocate who became one of California's most powerful and wealthy lobbyists during five decades in Sacramento, died Friday. He was 87. Nicknamed "the Judge" and called "Gari" by friends, Garibaldi was a familiar figure in the Capitol, where legislators who often enjoyed the largess of his clients lamented his death.
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NEWS
September 11, 1993 | From Associated Press
James D. Garibaldi, the courtly advocate who became one of California's most powerful and wealthy lobbyists during five decades in Sacramento, died Friday. He was 87. Nicknamed "the Judge" and called "Gari" by friends, Garibaldi was a familiar figure in the Capitol, where legislators who often enjoyed the largess of his clients lamented his death.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1986
Words can kill. At least they can kill bills in the Assembly, as rookie Assemblyman Gil Ferguson (R-Newport Beach) discovered. Ferguson, whose blunt verbal attacks quickly earned him the nickname "Rambo" in the Assembly, was sore when his bill to reinstate an independent coroner's office in Orange County died in the Assembly.
NEWS
September 15, 1993 | JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A who's who of state Capitol notables attended funeral services Tuesday for James D. Garibaldi, the man who was called the king of Sacramento lobbyists. For more than four decades and through the reign of seven governors, Garibaldi twisted legislators' arms to obtain votes on bills that his clients, including the powerful liquor and horse-racing interests, wanted passed or killed.
NEWS
November 10, 1987 | DAVID LAUTER and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
President Reagan and Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III met Monday with two key Republican senators to try to gauge the depth of hard-line conservatives' reservations about Anthony M. Kennedy, the California federal judge who is the leading candidate for the vacant seat on the Supreme Court. Two days after nominee Douglas H.
NEWS
August 28, 1986 | JERRY GILLAM, Times Staff Writer
As the two-year legislative session rushes to a close this week, Capitol lobbyists are working hard to earn the fat salaries they are paid to influence action on hundreds of bills their clients want--or don't want. They also are investing in their own futures because a good won-and-lost record on bills is the best way for lobbyists to ensure that their contracts are renewed or that they land a big raise for next year. Lobbying is big business in the Capitol.
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | JERRY GILLAM, Times Staff Writer
As the Legislature rushes toward adjournment with the fate of hundreds of bills still hanging in the balance, some lobbyists are grumbling about the record number of political fund-raisers for which they are being pressured to buy tickets. "I'm not going to say that it is extortion or blackmail," one lobbyist said.
NEWS
September 24, 1987 | JESS BRAVIN, Times Staff Writer
Newport Beach Assemblyman Gil Ferguson compares the war he has waged against Tom Hayden to the struggle against apartheid. "I don't enjoy doing it, I don't derive any pleasure from it, but it's something I have to do," the Republican lawmaker said with solemnity, comparing the emotional significance of his efforts against Hayden to other legislators' resolutions condemning Pretoria's system of racial segregation.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | WILLIAM OVEREND and LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writers
Anthony M. Kennedy--described as a "straight arrow" and "almost prissy" by other members of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals--astonished a group of Sacramento law students recently by giving a lecture in a powdered wig and three-cornered hat. Kennedy, who teaches constitutional law at McGeorge School of Law, was observing the bicentennial of the U.S.
NEWS
January 20, 1987 | JERRY GILLAM and LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writers
As a major political scandal was unfolding at the state Capitol last year, a boastful Assembly Speaker Willie Brown said the investigation into the corrupt activities of former fireworks manufacturer W. Patrick Moriarty was little more than "a newspaper story" that would not result in any indictments of past or present legislators. "I think the Moriarty thing has just about petered out completely," he declared.
NEWS
March 17, 1986 | JERRY GILLAM, Times Staff Writer
A businessman who wanted to talk to an influential state legislator about a problem with a toxic waste permit was told that a $5,000 contribution to a campaign fund-raising dinner would buy him half an hour of the lawmaker's time. And for an additional $5,000, the man was informed, he could sit at the head table, thereby guaranteeing another conversation about his problem. Senate Minority Leader James W.
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