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James D Watkins

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NEWS
March 2, 1989 | From United Press International
The Senate on Wednesday overwhelmingly confirmed Louis W. Sullivan as health and human services secretary and James D. Watkins as energy secretary. In back-to-back ballots, senators voted 98 to 1 for Sullivan, a physician who was the only black nominated for a Cabinet post, and 99 to 0 for Watkins, a retired admiral who led former President Ronald Reagan's AIDS commission. Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N. C.) cast the vote against Sullivan.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Navy Adm. James D. Watkins was considered "an unlikely hero" after he was called out of retirement in 1987 to accomplish what many considered a near-impossible task — taking over the leadership of an embattled and divided presidential commission on AIDS. A former chief of naval operations, Watkins was a deeply religious Roman Catholic father of six who had once called the military's ban on homosexuals "a sound policy. " Yet he was also known as an independent and analytical thinker.
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NEWS
October 3, 1992 | Associated Press
Energy Secretary James D. Watkins said Friday that he will leave the Cabinet even if President Bush is reelected to a second term. "I can't afford it anymore. I'm a retired Navy veteran. I have had to give up $300,000 in retirement pay," Watkins, a retired admiral and former chief of naval operations, told reporters. He gave no details on his plans after leaving the Cabinet. Watkins was among Cabinet members appointed by Bush when he took office in 1989.
NEWS
October 3, 1992 | Associated Press
Energy Secretary James D. Watkins said Friday that he will leave the Cabinet even if President Bush is reelected to a second term. "I can't afford it anymore. I'm a retired Navy veteran. I have had to give up $300,000 in retirement pay," Watkins, a retired admiral and former chief of naval operations, told reporters. He gave no details on his plans after leaving the Cabinet. Watkins was among Cabinet members appointed by Bush when he took office in 1989.
NEWS
June 17, 1988 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Last fall, shortly after Adm. James D. Watkins was asked to lead the embattled presidential AIDS commission, one of its members, New York cancer specialist Burton Lee, was confronted by several leaders of New York City's gay community, hard hit by the epidemic. They were very upset. "My God, a military man," Lee recalled them saying. "How are we going to get any breaks from a guy like this?"
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Energy Secretary James D. Watkins told a House Armed Services subcommittee that in the next few weeks he expects to approve restarting the K nuclear reactor at Savannah River, Ga. The 37-year-old plant is the only remaining U.S. source of radioactive tritium, which is crucial to the hydrogen bomb. It was shut down in 1988 for modifications that cost nearly $1 billion.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
Energy Secretary James D. Watkins said Friday that he would reject a federal judge's request that he testify in Ohio on the disputed terms of a $78-million pollution settlement with neighbors of the Fernald nuclear weapons plant. Watkins said also in an interview that he would present to President Bush within two weeks a plan for restoring the nation's capability to produce a gas needed to make nuclear warheads.
NEWS
January 13, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Adm. James D. Watkins, the imposing 6-foot-4, silver-haired former member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff who is President-elect Bush's choice to head the Energy Department, often tells the story of a pivotal moment in his most recent public role, that of chairman of the presidential AIDS commission. It occurred as he listened to the poignant testimony of the mother of a 12-year-old AIDS-infected boy who had been isolated by his classmates and his community.
NEWS
June 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Energy Secretary James D. Watkins on Thursday ordered his department to go ahead with development of a radioactive waste repository in New Mexico, saying it meets all required environmental laws. The plant will be the country's first central repository for radioactive wastes from nearly a dozen nuclear weapons plants. The wastes will be placed in salt beds 2,150 feet underground. Watkins said the plant near Carlsbad, N.M.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Expanding an innovative arrangement begun last year, Energy Secretary James D. Watkins Thursday signed agreements between the Bonneville Power Administration and three big Southern California utilities to exchange up to 725 megawatts of electricity in 1992. Bonneville, the federal agency that markets hydroelectric power from federal power plants along the Columbia River in the Pacific Northwest, will generate extra electricity this summer to be sent to Southern California.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Expanding an innovative arrangement begun last year, Energy Secretary James D. Watkins Thursday signed agreements between the Bonneville Power Administration and three big Southern California utilities to exchange up to 725 megawatts of electricity in 1992. Bonneville, the federal agency that markets hydroelectric power from federal power plants along the Columbia River in the Pacific Northwest, will generate extra electricity this summer to be sent to Southern California.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Energy Secretary James D. Watkins told a House Armed Services subcommittee that in the next few weeks he expects to approve restarting the K nuclear reactor at Savannah River, Ga. The 37-year-old plant is the only remaining U.S. source of radioactive tritium, which is crucial to the hydrogen bomb. It was shut down in 1988 for modifications that cost nearly $1 billion.
NEWS
March 25, 1991 | By The Times' Washington staff
The Gulf War postponed the traditional biennial job shuffle that punctuates the midpoints of presidential terms. Now that the crisis is over, some changes could be on the horizon. TRYING AGAIN: Robert M. Gates, President Bush's deputy national security adviser, has made no effort to hide his ambition to make a second bid for the top CIA post once William H. Webster, the director since 1987, steps down.
NEWS
June 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Energy Secretary James D. Watkins on Thursday ordered his department to go ahead with development of a radioactive waste repository in New Mexico, saying it meets all required environmental laws. The plant will be the country's first central repository for radioactive wastes from nearly a dozen nuclear weapons plants. The wastes will be placed in salt beds 2,150 feet underground. Watkins said the plant near Carlsbad, N.M.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two vital components of the nation's crippled nuclear weapons production complex will resume operating before the end of this year, Energy Secretary James D. Watkins told Congress Wednesday. The projected timetable, which Watkins admitted is "ambitious," aroused skepticism from some members of the House Armed Services defense nuclear subcommittee, who also expressed concern that the expedited schedule might give short shrift to safety concerns.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The volume of radioactive waste generated at the troubled Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant in Colorado has been cut by half in recent months. It should be reduced by half again next summer, easing a storage crisis building for more than a year, Energy Secretary James D. Watkins told the nation's governors here Monday.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two vital components of the nation's crippled nuclear weapons production complex will resume operating before the end of this year, Energy Secretary James D. Watkins told Congress Wednesday. The projected timetable, which Watkins admitted is "ambitious," aroused skepticism from some members of the House Armed Services defense nuclear subcommittee, who also expressed concern that the expedited schedule might give short shrift to safety concerns.
NEWS
March 25, 1991 | By The Times' Washington staff
The Gulf War postponed the traditional biennial job shuffle that punctuates the midpoints of presidential terms. Now that the crisis is over, some changes could be on the horizon. TRYING AGAIN: Robert M. Gates, President Bush's deputy national security adviser, has made no effort to hide his ambition to make a second bid for the top CIA post once William H. Webster, the director since 1987, steps down.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Energy Secretary James D. Watkins said Friday that plutonium operations will be halted indefinitely at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant until all safety concerns are met. Watkins also announced a major management shake-up at the plant, and said the new management structure will make the plant more responsive to safety concerns.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
Energy Secretary James D. Watkins said Friday that he would reject a federal judge's request that he testify in Ohio on the disputed terms of a $78-million pollution settlement with neighbors of the Fernald nuclear weapons plant. Watkins said also in an interview that he would present to President Bush within two weeks a plan for restoring the nation's capability to produce a gas needed to make nuclear warheads.
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