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James Darren

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2000 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During his heyday as a teen heartthrob four decades ago, actor-singer James Darren scored five top-10 singles, including "Her Royal Majesty" and the Grammy-nominated "Goodbye Cruel World." Darren, who soared to stardom playing Moondoggie opposite Sandra Dee in "Gidget" in 1959, also recorded 12 albums and performed on everything from "American Bandstand" to "The Ed Sullivan Show."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2004 | Susan King
You would be hard-pressed to find a female baby boomer who didn't have a crush years ago on James Darren. The dark-haired, puppy dog-eyed heartthrob played the dreamy surfer Moondoggie in 1959's "Gidget" with Sandra Dee and the 1961 sequel, "Gidget Goes Hawaiian." He also appeared in 1963's "Gidget Goes to Rome," as well as playing the hip scientist Dr. Tony Newman in the 1966-67 ABC series "The Time Tunnel."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2004 | Susan King
You would be hard-pressed to find a female baby boomer who didn't have a crush years ago on James Darren. The dark-haired, puppy dog-eyed heartthrob played the dreamy surfer Moondoggie in 1959's "Gidget" with Sandra Dee and the 1961 sequel, "Gidget Goes Hawaiian." He also appeared in 1963's "Gidget Goes to Rome," as well as playing the hip scientist Dr. Tony Newman in the 1966-67 ABC series "The Time Tunnel."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2000 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During his heyday as a teen heartthrob four decades ago, actor-singer James Darren scored five top-10 singles, including "Her Royal Majesty" and the Grammy-nominated "Goodbye Cruel World." Darren, who soared to stardom playing Moondoggie opposite Sandra Dee in "Gidget" in 1959, also recorded 12 albums and performed on everything from "American Bandstand" to "The Ed Sullivan Show."
NEWS
December 7, 2001 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES FASHION WRITER
A vintage poster of the Rat Pack--Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr., Peter Lawford and Joey Bishop--hangs at the Sy Devore store in Studio City. The debonair babe magnets are dressed in hip threads that made them the Mack Daddies of 1960s cool: sharkskin suits, skinny ties and tailored dress shirts. To look at the guys, you'd think they were decked out in the spare contemporary silhouettes of Prada. The fabrics are fine, the fit immaculate, details noteworthy.
NEWS
June 8, 1999
Public funeral services for entertainer Mel Torme are scheduled at 11 a.m. today in the chapel of Westwood Village Memorial Park, 1218 Glendon Ave., with burial to follow. Although the chapel will be reserved for family and close friends, outside seating and loudspeakers will be provided for the public.
OPINION
May 6, 2005
Re "Respect, Please, for Malibu's Best Gal," Commentary, May 2: I'm not taking anything away from the novella "Gidget." In fact I'm thrilled that "the whole town" (Malibu) is reading anything. I take issue with Deanne Stillman's assertion that "Gidget," the book, "altered the course" of American history. The tipping point was the Hollywood movie, under the same name. It was "Gidget," the movie, starring James Darren, Sandra Dee and Cliff Robertson, that drew legions to California beaches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1989
Nine suspected members of rival street gangs in La Puente and Ontario were arrested on suspicion of attempted murder early Thursday as more than 100 Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies swept through several cities serving search and arrest warrants. Eight firearms, including two assault-type weapons, and an undisclosed amount of cocaine were seized in the arrests, which were made at eight locations in La Puente, West Covina, Ontario, Valinda and Azusa.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman is The Times' jazz writer
Why do they keep doing it? What is the fatal attraction of the Frank Sinatra style and repertoire that keeps drawing so many male singers into its engulfing flame? It would be nice to think that some of the answers are provided by the performances themselves, by interpretations that start with Sinatra before moving into more personally expressive territory. But don't count on it.
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