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James Dean

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OPINION
September 30, 2010 | By Jaime O'Neill
James Dean died 55 years ago today, killed in a dramatic car wreck east of Paso Robles that became the stuff of legend. He was 24 when he died, and he inadvertently managed to take a lot of my generation with him, creating a cultural template for the risks we should take with our own lives. Had he lived, he'd be 80 in February. I was 13 when I first saw him in the movies, and his films offered me an introductory course in how to be a teenage boy in the 1950s. I saw "Rebel Without a Cause" half a dozen times, mostly because I was studying James Dean ?
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OPINION
September 23, 2013 | By K.C. Cole
A mathematical solution in Syria? That's not as crazy as it sounds. In fact, the working compromise is a classic case of the power of game theory, a branch of mathematics that analyzes the best possible outcomes in conflicts where neither side knows what the other will do. It's not about winning as much as it is finding the least worst option, which is precisely what Presidents Obama, Vladimir Putin, Bashar Assad and company have done. No one gets exactly what he wants. But no one loses everything either.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1995
If living icon Elizabeth Taylor could not suppress the kind of pap being served up by dollar-grabbing opportunists disguised as professionals, how is it that James Dean, dead and gone nearly 40 years, can warrant a spic-and-span bio-pic (Film Clips, April 30)? Is it a result of the copyright-law prowess of family attorney Mark Roesler, the slick marketing skills of the second generation of "name and image" entrepreneurs, or plain ol' Midwestern homophobia? Dean cousin Marcus Winslow Jr.'s reiteration that "you can rest assured that there won't be anything about him (Dean)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Marion Dougherty came to New York from Pennsylvania in 1944 with dreams of becoming a theater set designer. While waiting for her big break, she worked for $45 a week designing windows at Bergdorf Goodman. But Dougherty's break came in a different form a few years later when a friend working at the NBC live anthology series "Kraft Television Theater" asked her to become a casting assistant on the show. In time, Dougherty would transform - and in many ways invent - the role of casting director that made her a legend in New York and Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2001 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Agents said he was strange. Others considered him weird. The one thing everyone agreed on was that he was brilliant. Cool and classy, the TNT biopic "James Dean" (8 p.m., 10 p.m. and midnight Sunday) offers a persuasive portrait of the gifted young rebel who died at 24.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2008 | AL MARTINEZ
If it weren't for the fact that James Dean was killed about a mile up the road, you probably would have never heard of Cholame. It's a dreary little town in San Luis Obispo County on a stretch of highway that connects 101 with I-5, slicing through countryside that contains almost nothing notable, unless you're one of those who still cries yourself to sleep at night over an actor's long-ago death. About the only visible structure in the community of 116 souls is the Jack Ranch Cafe, a rustic wood building whose grounds contain a memorial to Dean around what is known as the tree of heaven.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
As a California Highway Patrol officer in San Luis Obispo County, Ernie Tripke had never heard of James Dean before Sept. 30, 1955. But from that day forward, Tripke never quite escaped being asked about the day he responded to the two-car crash that took the life of the young Hollywood star at the rural junction of Highways 41 and 466 (now Highway 46) near Cholame. Tripke, 88, one of two CHP officers who arrived at the scene of the crash, died of heart and lung problems Tuesday in a skilled nursing facility in San Luis Obispo, said his daughter, Julie Tripke.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2005 | From Associated Press
Red lipstick kisses are sun-baked into James Dean's pink granite gravestone, testifying to the enduring allure of the man who, 50 years after his death, remains a symbol of rebellious, misunderstood youth. Frozen in time by death -- forever handsome, sullen and projecting a cool nonchalance -- Dean is winning new fans with his legacy of cinematic magic, sex appeal and tragedy. His three big films have been digitally restored and were released Tuesday as a DVD box set.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1991 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Easter Sunday, 1951, a 20-year-old James Dean played John the Apostle on Father Patrick Peyton's "Family Theater" production "Hill Number One." It was his second professional job, following a commercial. His performance so mesmerized Catholic school girls at a local parochial school in Los Angeles that they formed the Immaculate Heart James Dean Appreciation Society.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | RIP RENSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I drove up to the Griffith Observatory the other day to give myself the illusion of being away from the city. I loitered around the grounds for a while, staring with dumb admiration at the familiar, slender white sculptures of history's pioneering astronomers gracing the front lawn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
During the car-crazy 1950s in Southern California, Dean Jeffries was one of the first hot rodders to chop, channel and soup-up automobiles. His distinctive paint jobs and sculpted body work attracted many admirers to his auto shop, including the likes of James Dean, Steve McQueen and A.J. Foyt. A legendary car painter and customizer who made the "Monkeemobile" and the original Green Hornet's "Black Beauty," Jeffries died in his sleep Saturday at his home in Hollywood. He was 80 and had been in declining health.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
As a movie icon, the American farmer has, for many a year, occupied a hand-whittled pedestal, standing tall as a weathered symbol of all that's good and true in this screwed-up world. One of the galvanic surprises of "At Any Price," the Iowa-set drama starring Dennis Quaid and Zac Efron, is that it upends every cliché and worn-out romantic notion about farming and places it in the real world of agribusiness and high-stakes economic pressure. Director Ramin Bahrani approaches the subject with the same journalist's curiosity that made his earlier films, among them the pitch-perfect "Chop Shop," such sharp depictions of otherwise invisible subcultures and the outsiders who inhabit them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
"The Rebel & the King" is a sweetly naive account by the late actor Nick Adams about his friendship with a young Elvis Presley. Adams wrote the manuscript in the late 1950s when he was a rising star in Hollywood. It was recently found in a box of the actor's memorabilia by his daughter, playwright Allyson Adams. She was just 7 when her father was found dead at 36 under mysterious circumstances at his home on Feb. 7, 1968, of a drug overdose. No weapons or pills were found around his body.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2012
Phyllis Thaxter Veteran actress played Clark Kent's mother Phyllis Thaxter, 92, an actress who had an active film career in the 1940s and '50s and capped it with her portrayal of Clark Kent's mother in the 1978 version of "Superman," died Tuesday at her home in Orlando, Fla., said her daughter, actress Skye Aubrey. She hadAlzheimer's disease. After watching her screen test, MGM executives chose Thaxter, a stage actress, to play opposite Van Johnson in the World War II drama "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo" (1944)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
James Franco's "Rebel" fills a Hollywood furniture warehouse with movie and TV-style stage sets, sculptural installations and video projections - some made by Franco, many made by other artists. Inspired by "Rebel Without a Cause," the celebrated 1955 movie, as well as by the tabloid mythology that almost instantly grew up around actor James Dean's best-known film, "Rebel" suffers a predictable fate: It withers by inevitable comparison. Art that seeks to appropriate, honor, deconstruct or otherwise make reference to an icon of earlier art faces a very high hurdle - namely, the icon itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2012 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
James Franco is an actor-turned-artist-turned-author-turned-actor-playing-an-artist-named-Franco in the soap opera "General Hospital" — who has made a movie, "Francophrenia," that documents the experience. He's about as "meta" as it gets. Now Franco has brought his knack for melding pop culture and fine art in unorthodox ways to a new exhibition for Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art. "Rebel," which opens Tuesday, is a high-concept group show that is a loose, interpretive ode to the 1955 James Dean film "Rebel Without a Cause.
NEWS
September 1, 1997 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the BBC announced to viewers that the Princess of Wales had died in a car crash early Sunday, it did so to the image of the Union Jack waving at half-staff and the strains of "God Save the Queen."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1997
Near sunset on Sept. 30, 1955, actor James Dean was killed when the two-seat Porsche Spyder he was driving slammed into a Ford sedan on Route 41 near Paso Robles. The death launched a Hollywood legend. To commemorate that fateful day--as well as publicize a new movie based on Dean's life--a 50-car caravan will depart Bob's Big Boy restaurant in Burbank this Saturday morning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2011 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
Thanks to the conveniences of the wired world, Peter Winkler was able to write a book and find an agent and a publisher without ever having to leave his North Hollywood home. Winkler raced to produce the first biography of Dennis Hopper to come out after the actor died in May 2010. It was only when the book was on the shelves that his agent learned how he had done it. "My God, I had no idea," said Robert Diforio of Weston, Conn., who sold "Dennis Hopper: The Wild Ride of a Hollywood Rebel" to a small East Coast publisher, Barricade Books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
As a California Highway Patrol officer in San Luis Obispo County, Ernie Tripke had never heard of James Dean before Sept. 30, 1955. But from that day forward, Tripke never quite escaped being asked about the day he responded to the two-car crash that took the life of the young Hollywood star at the rural junction of Highways 41 and 466 (now Highway 46) near Cholame. Tripke, 88, one of two CHP officers who arrived at the scene of the crash, died of heart and lung problems Tuesday in a skilled nursing facility in San Luis Obispo, said his daughter, Julie Tripke.
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