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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1997 | DAVID E. BRADY
His life ended on a lonely stretch of California road more than 41 years ago, but James Dean's star will shine forever. The moody actor awoke on the last day of his life in his rented home at 14611 Sutton St. in Sherman Oaks. Destroyed in a fire several years later, the property served as Dean's refuge from the pressures of show business. Born in Indiana, Dean landed his first professional acting job in a Pepsi commercial filmed in Griffith Park.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Marion Dougherty came to New York from Pennsylvania in 1944 with dreams of becoming a theater set designer. While waiting for her big break, she worked for $45 a week designing windows at Bergdorf Goodman. But Dougherty's break came in a different form a few years later when a friend working at the NBC live anthology series "Kraft Television Theater" asked her to become a casting assistant on the show. In time, Dougherty would transform - and in many ways invent - the role of casting director that made her a legend in New York and Hollywood.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1996
Having been a happy, naive, optimistic teenager of "the conformist '50s," I was given quite a jolt into reality on that last day of September 1955, as I walked to work as a box boy and saw the tragic headline: "James Dean Killed!" History was relived as I avidly read (June 25) that he is being eulogized on a first-class stamp. I have seen "East of Eden," "Rebel Without a Cause" and "Giant," but the first time I became aware of Dean was on the television show, "Schlitz Playhouse of Stars," in a drama which epitomized Dean then and now, appropriately entitled "The Drifter."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2012
Phyllis Thaxter Veteran actress played Clark Kent's mother Phyllis Thaxter, 92, an actress who had an active film career in the 1940s and '50s and capped it with her portrayal of Clark Kent's mother in the 1978 version of "Superman," died Tuesday at her home in Orlando, Fla., said her daughter, actress Skye Aubrey. She hadAlzheimer's disease. After watching her screen test, MGM executives chose Thaxter, a stage actress, to play opposite Van Johnson in the World War II drama "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo" (1944)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2001 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Agents said he was strange. Others considered him weird. The one thing everyone agreed on was that he was brilliant. Cool and classy, the TNT biopic "James Dean" (8 p.m., 10 p.m. and midnight Sunday) offers a persuasive portrait of the gifted young rebel who died at 24.
NEWS
December 13, 1991 | BETH ANN KRIER
DEAR HOT SHOPPERS: It sounded like the best thing to happen to malls since Mrs. Fields' cookies. The Glendale Galleria claimed to be offering free, year-round concierge service. A press release, quoting Concierge Desk director Norm Allen, said: "We do a lot of product search. . . . One lady called to ask where she could find a brass Buddha. If we can't locate an item at the mall, we research to find it somewhere nearby."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2008 | AL MARTINEZ
If it weren't for the fact that James Dean was killed about a mile up the road, you probably would have never heard of Cholame. It's a dreary little town in San Luis Obispo County on a stretch of highway that connects 101 with I-5, slicing through countryside that contains almost nothing notable, unless you're one of those who still cries yourself to sleep at night over an actor's long-ago death. About the only visible structure in the community of 116 souls is the Jack Ranch Cafe, a rustic wood building whose grounds contain a memorial to Dean around what is known as the tree of heaven.
OPINION
September 30, 2010 | By Jaime O'Neill
James Dean died 55 years ago today, killed in a dramatic car wreck east of Paso Robles that became the stuff of legend. He was 24 when he died, and he inadvertently managed to take a lot of my generation with him, creating a cultural template for the risks we should take with our own lives. Had he lived, he'd be 80 in February. I was 13 when I first saw him in the movies, and his films offered me an introductory course in how to be a teenage boy in the 1950s. I saw "Rebel Without a Cause" half a dozen times, mostly because I was studying James Dean ?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1985 | DEBRA ZAHN, Zahn, former life style editor for the Herald Examiner and assistant features editor of the Daily News, is View editor for The Times' San Fernando Valley edition.
It's dusk as a van pulls alongside James Dean's grave in a cemetery less than a mile from the stately white farmhouse in which he was raised. The blue Indiana sky is beginning to turn lavender and the cornfield across the street sparkles with the lights of thousands of fireflies. Terry Lee Dunn, 24 and unemployed, slides open the van door and silently contemplates Dean's small, plain gravestone.
NEWS
September 1, 1997 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the BBC announced to viewers that the Princess of Wales had died in a car crash early Sunday, it did so to the image of the Union Jack waving at half-staff and the strains of "God Save the Queen."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
James Franco's "Rebel" fills a Hollywood furniture warehouse with movie and TV-style stage sets, sculptural installations and video projections - some made by Franco, many made by other artists. Inspired by "Rebel Without a Cause," the celebrated 1955 movie, as well as by the tabloid mythology that almost instantly grew up around actor James Dean's best-known film, "Rebel" suffers a predictable fate: It withers by inevitable comparison. Art that seeks to appropriate, honor, deconstruct or otherwise make reference to an icon of earlier art faces a very high hurdle - namely, the icon itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2012 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
James Franco is an actor-turned-artist-turned-author-turned-actor-playing-an-artist-named-Franco in the soap opera "General Hospital" — who has made a movie, "Francophrenia," that documents the experience. He's about as "meta" as it gets. Now Franco has brought his knack for melding pop culture and fine art in unorthodox ways to a new exhibition for Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art. "Rebel," which opens Tuesday, is a high-concept group show that is a loose, interpretive ode to the 1955 James Dean film "Rebel Without a Cause.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
As a California Highway Patrol officer in San Luis Obispo County, Ernie Tripke had never heard of James Dean before Sept. 30, 1955. But from that day forward, Tripke never quite escaped being asked about the day he responded to the two-car crash that took the life of the young Hollywood star at the rural junction of Highways 41 and 466 (now Highway 46) near Cholame. Tripke, 88, one of two CHP officers who arrived at the scene of the crash, died of heart and lung problems Tuesday in a skilled nursing facility in San Luis Obispo, said his daughter, Julie Tripke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2010 | By Tom Ragan, Los Angeles Times
At age 8, Emily Melville lost her mother, father and older sister along a stretch of Highway 46 when a big-rig collided with the family's minivan in May 2006. The family was returning home to the Central Coast after visiting Disneyland. Earlier this year, Aaron Salgado, 26, died as he attempted to turn off Highway 46 into the driveway of his home. His car was struck from behind and propelled into an oncoming pickup truck as his wife watched in horror from their frontyard. And perhaps most famously, actor James Dean died on the same highway 55 years ago last Thursday as he was heading to Salinas to compete in an automobile race.
OPINION
September 30, 2010 | By Jaime O'Neill
James Dean died 55 years ago today, killed in a dramatic car wreck east of Paso Robles that became the stuff of legend. He was 24 when he died, and he inadvertently managed to take a lot of my generation with him, creating a cultural template for the risks we should take with our own lives. Had he lived, he'd be 80 in February. I was 13 when I first saw him in the movies, and his films offered me an introductory course in how to be a teenage boy in the 1950s. I saw "Rebel Without a Cause" half a dozen times, mostly because I was studying James Dean ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2010 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Corey Allen, an actor-turned Emmy Award-winning director who earned a slice of film immortality in the 1950s playing the doomed high school gang leader who challenges James Dean to a "chicken run" in "Rebel Without a Cause," has died. He was 75. Allen died at his home in Hollywood on Sunday, two days before his 76 t h birthday, said family spokesman Mickey Cottrell. The specific cause was not given. Allen had Parkinson's disease for the last two decades, Cottrell said, but he remained active directing plays until a few years ago. Allen's death came a month after that of another "Rebel" alumnus, Dennis Hopper , who played one of the high school gang members.
NEWS
July 27, 2001 | ANN O'NEILL
James Franco, the 22-year-old actor who looks like and stars as James Dean in the TNT Original movie of the same name, stopped talking to his friends and family, picked up a two-pack-a-day ciggie habit, learned to play bongos and rode motorcycles to get into character. He tells us he even got to know Dean's friends, Martin Landau and Dennis Hopper, and Dean's old girlfriend, Liz Sheridan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2010 | By Steve Harvey, Los Angeles Times
It used to be a sort of running joke: Where else but in Southern California would a high school have a statue of a movie star on its front lawn? The reference was to Venice High's Myrna Loy monument. But there was an explanation. Loy was not an actress, just a student, when she modeled for the sculpture in 1922. The oft-damaged cement work was replaced by a bronze version earlier this month. Several other local statues and busts of notables also occupy what seem, at first glance, to be unlikely settings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan
Dennis Stock, a photographer best known for his iconic Life magazine photo of film legend James Dean walking through a rainy Times Square in a dark overcoat, has died. He was 81. Stock, who was diagnosed with colon and liver cancer a few weeks ago and developed pneumonia in recent days, died Monday night at a hospital in Sarasota, Fla., said Mark Lubell of Magnum Photos. "His singular most iconic image would definitely be his James Dean walking down Times Square with a cigarette in his mouth, because James Dean became an icon of a generation and that image represented so much to that generation," said Lubell, director of Magnum, a photographic cooperative that Stock joined in 1951.
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