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James Deckard

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January 9, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Filming the flaming oil fields in Kuwait last year--the worst oil field disaster in history--James Deckard brought his camera as close as 20 feet to violent flames that shot skyward like high-speed geysers, as hot as 4,000 degrees. He developed a hacking, lingering cough, irritated his eyes and severely burned his fingers. For a time, he had to bathe with diesel fuel.
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NEWS
March 9, 1996
James Fredrick Deckard, 58, Emmy-winning cinematographer of documentaries for television. He won an Emmy and the Cine Golden Eagle Award for the 1980 National Geographic special "Polar Bear Alert," which he created, produced and photographed. In 1991, Deckard produced and directed the award-winning environmental documentary "Hell on Earth: The Kuwaiti Oil Fires" for the Arts & Entertainment cable network.
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NEWS
March 9, 1996
James Fredrick Deckard, 58, Emmy-winning cinematographer of documentaries for television. He won an Emmy and the Cine Golden Eagle Award for the 1980 National Geographic special "Polar Bear Alert," which he created, produced and photographed. In 1991, Deckard produced and directed the award-winning environmental documentary "Hell on Earth: The Kuwaiti Oil Fires" for the Arts & Entertainment cable network.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Filming the flaming oil fields in Kuwait last year--the worst oil field disaster in history--James Deckard brought his camera as close as 20 feet to violent flames that shot skyward like high-speed geysers, as hot as 4,000 degrees. He developed a hacking, lingering cough, irritated his eyes and severely burned his fingers. For a time, he had to bathe with diesel fuel.
NEWS
November 24, 2001 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ricochet picks up his head and looks around. The Steak N Shake is deserted. A waitress with a bob haircut and blank eyes slouches against a window, watching the rigs chug out of the parking lot. A sad country song leaks out of a pair of speakers: "She's actin' single, I'm drinkin' doubles. . . ." Ricochet could be anywhere, for there is an unmistakable homogeneity to life on the big road. But these days the drill is a little different. The terrorist attacks have changed things here too.
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