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James Dickey

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November 4, 1990
Air, much greater than the sea-- More basic, more human than the sea: all that air Is calm: unpeopled, wearing the high lucidity Of vigil. Maybe one day the mere surface Of the earth will feel you. But the air You can never keep doesn't know When it lived in your chest: Mindless, nerveless, breathless, The air glitters All the outside, and keeps carrying You from within. From the poem, "Immortals," excerpted from "The Eagle's Mile" by James Dickey (University Press of New England: $20; $9.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Matthew J. Bruccoli, 76, a University of South Carolina English professor who wrote and edited about two dozen books on author F. Scott Fitzgerald, died Wednesday of a brain tumor at his home in Columbia, S.C. Bruccoli taught at the university for almost 40 years and was the Emily Brown Jefferies distinguished professor emeritus. He was best known for his authoritative works on Fitzgerald, including "Some Sort of Epic Grandeur: The Life of F. Scott Fitzgerald" (1981) and "Scott and Ernest: The Fitzgerald-Hemingway Friendship" (1978)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Dickey, a poet, author and writer best remembered for his 1970 novel "Deliverance," about civilized man's struggle and survival in the wilderness, has died. He was 73. Dickey, a Southerner who set the internationally best-selling novel in Georgia, died Sunday in Columbia, S.C., of complications from lung disease. A prolific writer of essays, criticism and poetry, Dickey wrote few novels and insisted that he did so only to pay the rent--poetry was his true interest.
NEWS
January 21, 2001
"There'll Be No Bard at the Inauguration" (Jan. 11) by staff writer Renee Tawa mentioned that there have only been three occasions when poets read at presidential inaugurations, namely Robert Frost at JFK's, Maya Angelou at President Clinton's first inauguration and Miller Williams at Clinton's second inauguration. In fact, there were four such occasions. At Jimmy Carter's inauguration, the celebrated Georgia poet and novelist James Dickey read poetry composed for the event. How soon we forget!
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1998 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A little girl in a sunflower hat, armed only with a garden tool and "gumption," is the unlikely vanquisher of evil in "Bronwen, the Traw, and the Shape-Shifter," Bridget Hanley's one-woman play for children that has been extended through Sunday at Theatre West and will reopen there in May.
BOOKS
June 7, 1987 | Henry Taylor, Taylor, a native of Virginia, teaches at The American University in Washington. He received the 1986 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for "The Flying Change."
James Dickey has been giving us tantalizing news of this novel for several years; a section of it, under the title "Cahill Is Blind," appeared in Esquire in 1976, and in 1971, numerous notes concerning it were in "Sorties," the first 150 pages of which were a curious exercise in the creation of a writer's journal.
BOOKS
September 19, 1993 | Richard Wiley, Richard Wiley is the winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award for "Soldiers in Hiding," set in Japan. His fifth novel, "Ahmed's Revenge," will appear next year
James Dickey makes novels out of ideas. In "Deliverance," 23 years ago, the idea was to take four men, each representing various degrees of self-reliance, and see what happens to them when, during a canoe trip down a wild river, the laws of civilization break down. As it turned out, the toughest of those men, a character named Lewis who must have had a bomb shelter full of weapons and canned goods in his back yard, was the prototype for Sgt.
BOOKS
January 18, 1987 | KRISTIANA GREGORY
Maybe it's the nature of parents who also happen to be best-selling authors. Some tell their children a bedtime story over and over until it sounds so blasted fantastic, why, the rest of the world must be dying to hear it, too, and off to a publisher they march. James Herriot did it two years ago with his warbly "Moses the Kitten." Recently James Clavell finished "Thrump-O-Moto," and William Kennedy and his son Brendan stirred up some malarkey in "Charley Malarkey and the Belly-Button Machine."
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As James Dickey is the first to point out, to pin him down as a literary fixture of the South--mainly on his reputation as the author of "Deliverance"--is to ig nore his broad, free-ranging life. For a time in the 1960s, when he established himself as one of his generation's leading poets, Dickey--who is "comin' up on my big 7-0 birthday, on Ground Hog Day," he says--seemed to be living everywhere: Madison, Wis.; Portland, Ore.
SPORTS
February 28, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
First-year Coach James Dickey, 37, of Texas Tech accepted a new contract and a pay raise to $95,000 per season for rebuilding the Red Raider program so quickly. They are 13-13.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1998 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actress Bridget Hanley returns to Theatre West on Monday for a special performance of her evocative one-woman show for children, "Bronwen, the Traw and the Shape-Shifter," poet James Dickey's adventure-filled, epic fantasy. Hanley portrays Bronwen, a little girl who uses a garden tool and her "gumption" to defend a kingdom of squirrels and "frightened children everywhere" from the terrifying "All-Dark"; she serves as narrator and plays a pair of endearing squirrels.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1998 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A little girl in a sunflower hat, armed only with a garden tool and "gumption," is the unlikely vanquisher of evil in "Bronwen, the Traw, and the Shape-Shifter," Bridget Hanley's one-woman play for children that has been extended through Sunday at Theatre West and will reopen there in May.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1998 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The second production of Theatre West Youth Theatre's inaugural season is an inspired choice: poet James Dickey's rich epic for children, "Bronwen, the Traw and the Shape-Shifter."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Dickey, a poet, author and writer best remembered for his 1970 novel "Deliverance," about civilized man's struggle and survival in the wilderness, has died. He was 73. Dickey, a Southerner who set the internationally best-selling novel in Georgia, died Sunday in Columbia, S.C., of complications from lung disease. A prolific writer of essays, criticism and poetry, Dickey wrote few novels and insisted that he did so only to pay the rent--poetry was his true interest.
BOOKS
September 19, 1993 | Richard Wiley, Richard Wiley is the winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award for "Soldiers in Hiding," set in Japan. His fifth novel, "Ahmed's Revenge," will appear next year
James Dickey makes novels out of ideas. In "Deliverance," 23 years ago, the idea was to take four men, each representing various degrees of self-reliance, and see what happens to them when, during a canoe trip down a wild river, the laws of civilization break down. As it turned out, the toughest of those men, a character named Lewis who must have had a bomb shelter full of weapons and canned goods in his back yard, was the prototype for Sgt.
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As James Dickey is the first to point out, to pin him down as a literary fixture of the South--mainly on his reputation as the author of "Deliverance"--is to ig nore his broad, free-ranging life. For a time in the 1960s, when he established himself as one of his generation's leading poets, Dickey--who is "comin' up on my big 7-0 birthday, on Ground Hog Day," he says--seemed to be living everywhere: Madison, Wis.; Portland, Ore.
BOOKS
June 14, 1992
When the sound of forest leaves is like the sleep-talk Of half-brothers; when it trembles shorts itself out Between branches, and is like light that does not cost Itself any light, let me turn: turn right then, Right as it happens and say: I crave wandering And giving: I crave My own blood, that makes the body Of the lover in my arms give up On the great sparkling vault of her form, when I think instead Of my real brother, who talks like no leaf Or no half, and of the road he will be on As my
SPORTS
February 28, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
First-year Coach James Dickey, 37, of Texas Tech accepted a new contract and a pay raise to $95,000 per season for rebuilding the Red Raider program so quickly. They are 13-13.
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