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James Diego Vigil

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1992 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All Latino gang members are cholos , but not all cholos are gang members. There is a difference between immigrants and Latinos who were born in the United States. And violence is not a hereditary trait passed down through generations of Latinos.
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BOOKS
August 18, 2002 | TOM HAYDEN, Tom Hayden chaired a state Senate task force on gang violence prevention. He teaches a course on gangs at Occidental College and is writing a book on the subject.
Ten thousand deaths, nearly all African American and Latino young men, is the body count of Los Angeles gang violence in the last two decades, but when was the last time anyone read a headline declaring, "Death Toll in Gang Conflicts Reaches 10,000, Government Proposes Peace Strategy"? Given the silence and disregard concerning these casualties, it is hard to avoid the conclusion that gang deaths are deemed lesser deaths than law-abiding ones. Some people even shrug them off as deserved.
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NEWS
December 11, 1988 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Elias Lopez never had a chance. He got sucked into something so much stronger than he was, something with a history so powerful, that there seemed no choice but to submit. He was 17, a nice, quietly handsome young man with jet-black hair and a plan. He was going to be a cop, a narcotics investigator. Sure, there were street gangs in his neighborhood, but he did not want to join one. All Elias wanted to do was look like a gang member.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1992 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All Latino gang members are cholos , but not all cholos are gang members. There is a difference between immigrants and Latinos who were born in the United States. And violence is not a hereditary trait passed down through generations of Latinos.
BOOKS
December 25, 1988 | Alex Raksin
This book probably will get a reception no warmer than the cholo (Chicano gang member) who finds himself on rival territory, for James Vigil's liberal analysis of these "victims of society" arrives at a time when sympathy for gangs is at an all-time low. News coverage of drive-by shootings and other random, senseless violence has hardened even bleeding hearts, suggesting a need for more prisons and police patrols, not more "counseling in the community."
BOOKS
August 18, 2002 | TOM HAYDEN, Tom Hayden chaired a state Senate task force on gang violence prevention. He teaches a course on gangs at Occidental College and is writing a book on the subject.
Ten thousand deaths, nearly all African American and Latino young men, is the body count of Los Angeles gang violence in the last two decades, but when was the last time anyone read a headline declaring, "Death Toll in Gang Conflicts Reaches 10,000, Government Proposes Peace Strategy"? Given the silence and disregard concerning these casualties, it is hard to avoid the conclusion that gang deaths are deemed lesser deaths than law-abiding ones. Some people even shrug them off as deserved.
NEWS
November 30, 1997 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was in the 1950s that anthropologists first identified the tiny Waorani tribe near the Amazon River in Ecuador as the most murderous people on Earth. Virtually no one lived to old age. Entire families were routinely wiped out with 9-foot spears. And the notion of killing a child was no more abhorrent than the notion of killing a snake. A staggering six out of 10 Waorani deaths came at the hands of another Waorani.
MAGAZINE
August 24, 2003 | Celeste Fremon, Celeste Fremon is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer who regularly covers gangs and the police.
When tragedy occurs, those who are most drastically affected often find themselves searching for the exact point at which another path could have been taken, as if by doing so, fate can be rewound and played again, this time without a devastating ending. Robert Leon has imagined a million times what he could have, should have done on the night that shattered his own and another's life.
NEWS
November 21, 1993 | Diane Seo
Calling herself a leader in urban style, Jody Orso said she has no sympathy for those who can't afford the hip, "fresh" and "dope" designer duds that she and many of her Westchester High School classmates drape themselves in. "At my high school, and schools like Crenshaw, Manual Arts and Dorsey, it's a big fashion show," said the South-Central resident. "And if you can't afford to dress for the party, you should go somewhere else." To pay for her Guess?
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | MEMO MUNOZ, SPECIAL TO NUESTRO TIEMPO
Steve Valdivia estimates that Latinos account for 60,000 of the 100,000 gang members in Los Angeles County. And those figures are multiplying faster than society can figure out ways to deal with them, said Valdivia, executive director of Community Youth Gang Services. Authorities report that the number of gang members, most of them males, has doubled in the last five years, corresponding with a similar rise in gang murders.
BOOKS
December 25, 1988 | Alex Raksin
This book probably will get a reception no warmer than the cholo (Chicano gang member) who finds himself on rival territory, for James Vigil's liberal analysis of these "victims of society" arrives at a time when sympathy for gangs is at an all-time low. News coverage of drive-by shootings and other random, senseless violence has hardened even bleeding hearts, suggesting a need for more prisons and police patrols, not more "counseling in the community."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2001 | AGUSTIN GURZA
A new and highly specialized gang has taken hold in Orange County, claiming turf in the heart of Irvine. They don't flash hand signs or wear baggy street clothes. In fact, one member sports a distinctly highbrow bow tie. But they have become a force bent on making their mark--at least within the occasionally cutthroat world of academia. This gang is composed of social scientists based at UC Irvine.
NEWS
August 12, 1997 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If St. Joseph's Hospital had been built just a few feet farther south, or if it had been just a little bit larger, Carlos Velez-Ibanez might have been born directly atop the U.S.-Mexico border. Not that anyone would have noticed, or cared. In 1936, the border was just a mark on the map that few paid much attention to. In some places, in fact, the locals weren't even sure where the border was.
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