Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJames Dobbins
IN THE NEWS

James Dobbins

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 15, 2001 | From Associated Press
The U.S. flag will be raised over the reopened embassy in Afghanistan on Sunday, signaling a renewed American diplomatic presence for the first time in 12 years, the State Department said. Ambassador James Dobbins, a veteran diplomat, will officiate at the ceremony, joined by a small number of State Department employees and a Marine security guard detachment. The mission will initially operate as a liaison office and will become a full-fledged embassy once diplomatic relations are restored.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
World nations and aid organizations Wednesday promised more than $2 billion to rebuild war-ravaged Kosovo--a sum that far exceeds the immediate need, officials said. Pledges from more than 60 countries, dozens of aid agencies and regional groups totaled nearly four times the amount needed to make immediate repairs and restore order in the region, said Johannes Linn, the World Bank's vice president for Europe and Central Asia.
NEWS
January 5, 1996 | The Washington Post
Under heavy fire from House Republicans, Clinton administration officials acknowledged Thursday that they suspect members of Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide's security forces were involved in politically related killings last year. But the officials, testifying before the House International Relations Committee, insisted that the overall level of violence in Haiti is far below what it was before the U.S. Army ousted Haiti's military rulers and restored Aristide to power in 1994. Rep.
NEWS
January 5, 1996 | THOMAS W. LIPPMAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Under fire from House Republicans, Clinton administration officials acknowledged Thursday that they suspect members of Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide's security forces were implicated in politically related killings last year. But the officials, testifying before the House International Relations Committee, insisted that the overall level of violence in Haiti is far below what it was before the U.S. Army ousted Haiti's military rulers and restored Aristide to power in 1994. Rep.
NEWS
November 6, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration on Monday named veteran diplomat James Dobbins, an architect of U.S. policy toward Kosovo and Bosnia-Herzegovina after the conflicts there, to serve as a special envoy to anti-Taliban forces in Afghanistan. "His mission is to continue our work with the Afghan opposition groups, the Afghan parties, to try to help them form a future government for Afghanistan," State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said.
OPINION
December 26, 2004
Re "Blast Kills 22 at U.S. Base," Dec. 22: After the massacre at Mosul, the time has come to evaluate our situation in Iraq seriously. How many more Americans killed will be necessary to convince the American people that Iraq is a lost cause? We are not fighting "insurgents"; we are fighting Iraqis who want us out of there. We invaded an innocent country with a terrible tyrant, government and political party, but the cure was not to attack and kill as many or more than Saddam Hussein had. How would we like to be invaded by a foreign power without having provoked such an attack?
OPINION
August 5, 2003
From the shah through the ayatollahs and into the elected regime now battling theocrats to rule Iran, Iranians' quest for nuclear power has been a constant for 30 years. In a country with so much oil, their explanation that they need commercial reactors to generate electricity for homes and factories warrants skepticism, if not disbelief.
NEWS
November 22, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. organizers of negotiations to form a transition government for Afghanistan announced Wednesday that they were moving the talks to a secluded Rhine River retreat near Bonn in an apparent attempt to sequester the fractious delegates and force swifter agreement.
NEWS
July 27, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration announced Monday that the United States will provide $500 million in short-term humanitarian assistance to help restore civil order in postwar Kosovo. In a speech here to the Council on Foreign Relations, National Security Advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger said the U.S. offer will be presented formally at a donors conference in Brussels scheduled for Wednesday for those nations underwriting short-term international assistance for the devastated province.
NEWS
January 6, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration said Tuesday that it expects time and mortality to accomplish what 40 years of U.S. policy have failed to do: end Fidel Castro's iron grip on Cuba. Explaining a series of steps intended to ease the plight of Cuban citizens while maintaining pressure on Castro's government, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said the objective is to "help the Cuban people prepare for the day when their country is once again free."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|