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James Doti

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BUSINESS
September 12, 1985
James Doti, an economics professor and founder of Chapman College's Center for Economic Research, has been promoted to Dean of the college's School of Business and Management. The promotion was announced this week by college president G.T. Smith, who praised Doti's work as a teacher at the college and as a researcher of economic and business trends.
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NEWS
October 22, 2000 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, Chapman University was the kid snoozing in the lecture hall, unmotivated and without prospects. If anyone outside Orange County had heard of Chapman, it was usually because of its World Campus Afloat, a cruise ship that used to take students on semester-long trips. But the ship was let go in the 1970s to help pay debts.
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NEWS
December 3, 1999 | RUSS STANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A forecast of economic variables adds up to a Democrat remaining in the White House after next year's election, according to Chapman University forecasters. An equation that uses changes in real gross domestic product and the consumer price index correctly predicted the winning candidate in 19 of the last 25 presidential elections, said James L. Doti, Chapman University president and holder of the Donald Bren Distinguished Chair in Business and Economics.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1993 | Chris Woodward, Times staff writer
During Chapman University's recent economic forecast update, economist James Doti--who doubles as the private school's president, predicted that tourism will increase by about 5% during 1993. When reminded just how lousy business has been for many in the tourism industry, Doti quickly responded that "it will be 5% better than horrible."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1997
Regarding Kenneth L. Khachigian's column, "Time to Stand Up to Elitist Eco-Moralists," and James L. Doti's Orange County Voices column, "Trip to Russia Proves Why We Need Lawyers," May 25: Occasionally, issues come together in The Times, columns that seem to shout out wonderful solutions! The proximity of articles by my friends James Doti and Ken Khachigian are a case in point. By any objective standard, we as a country are oppressively overburdened by an overabundance of both lawyers and eco-moralists.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
Chapman College on Wednesday named a popular campus professor and well-known economic forecaster as its 12th president, quickly replacing the chief executive who resigned this week. The new president, Chicago native James L. Doti, 44, has had two previous stints as acting president of the small, Christian, liberal arts college. He received spirited standing ovations from students and professors Wednesday at two campus gatherings held to introduce him. He replaces Allen E.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1994 | Greg Johnson / Times staff writer
Honored Prophet: When James L. Doti speaks, does Washington listen? During an early morning session Monday with the California Restaurant Assn.'s Orange County chapter, Doti predicted that Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan would move soon to keep inflation under control. Later that same day, Greenspan warned Congress that it might be necessary to raise interest rates to prevent a spurt of inflation.
NEWS
October 30, 1992 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
In December, Chapman University President James Doti crunched some numbers and predicted that President Bush would win reelection by a landslide. In June he updated his prediction to account for Ross Perot, and reduced Bush's margin of victory to 9 percentage points. On Thursday, a sheepish Doti revised his prediction once again: Democratic candidate Bill Clinton will win the presidency by a hair.
NEWS
December 3, 1999 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's strong economy will weaken a bit in 2000 as the construction market cools, consumer debt hits historic levels and higher interest rates slow the national economy, Chapman University economists said Thursday. The expanding housing market, in particular, will taper off, but perhaps not enough for most residents, according to the university's closely watched annual economic forecast.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1999 | DARYL STRICKLAND, Daryl Strickland covers real estate for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-5670, and at daryl.strickland@latimes.com
After one of the biggest surges ever last year, prices of existing homes in Orange County will climb at a much slower pace this year, Chapman University President James L. Doti said. Housing prices should move up about 4.6% this year, less than half the gains last year, when the market was fueled by high job growth, record low interest rates and exceptional gains in the stock market, said Doti, co-author of the university's annual economic forecast for the county.
NEWS
December 3, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years ago, Chapman University economist James L. Doti presided over the school's first forecast of the Orange County economy. About two dozen people showed up, most of them trustees of the Orange-based school. From those humble beginnings, a local phenomenon emerged. Equal parts meticulous econometrics and masterful marketing, the Chapman forecast has become an annual rite of the Orange County business community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1997
Regarding Kenneth L. Khachigian's column, "Time to Stand Up to Elitist Eco-Moralists," and James L. Doti's Orange County Voices column, "Trip to Russia Proves Why We Need Lawyers," May 25: Occasionally, issues come together in The Times, columns that seem to shout out wonderful solutions! The proximity of articles by my friends James Doti and Ken Khachigian are a case in point. By any objective standard, we as a country are oppressively overburdened by an overabundance of both lawyers and eco-moralists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1996 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling it "the most exciting time" in Chapman University's history, President James L. Doti said Tuesday that enrollment is fast increasing while classes remain small and ethnic diversity goals are being reached. Doti, in his annual State of the University address, said that Chapman has expanded without compromising its small-town charm, broadened curricula and succeeded in attracting minority students without using a quota system or different standards of admission.
NEWS
November 3, 1996 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the campus of Chapman University, autumn is as prominent as the bronze busts of Albert Schweitzer and Martin Luther King Jr. The air is crisp and cool, leaves have begun falling from the canopy of sycamores dotting the campus, and football is on everyone's mind. But, oh, how a mood can change. The atmosphere went from sunny to dark last week, in the motion of a single deed. Acting on his own volition, Chapman President James L. Doti forfeited the football team's five victories in 1996.
NEWS
December 3, 1999 | RUSS STANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A forecast of economic variables adds up to a Democrat remaining in the White House after next year's election, according to Chapman University forecasters. An equation that uses changes in real gross domestic product and the consumer price index correctly predicted the winning candidate in 19 of the last 25 presidential elections, said James L. Doti, Chapman University president and holder of the Donald Bren Distinguished Chair in Business and Economics.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1985 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Orange County's economy, which last year grew at a feverish rate, has slowed substantially this year and will remain at that slackened pace for at least the next year. And that's the good news from the semi-annual economic forecast unveiled by the Chapman College Center for Economic Research.
SPORTS
June 21, 1996 | MARTIN BECK
At its best, baseball can bring out the kid in adults, even university presidents. Witness the story Jim Doti, a noted economist and president at Chapman University in Orange, is telling this week: Doti, who helped mediate the deal between Disney and Anaheim that cleared the way for Disney to buy controlling interest in the Angels, was invited to watch Monday's game against the Chicago White Sox from Gene and Jackie Autry's private box at Anaheim Stadium.
NEWS
April 5, 1996 | MARK PLATTE and CHRIS FOSTER and GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Last Friday, six men stood around a conference table in Orange and decided the future of the California Angels. It wasn't Camp David, it was Chapman University. But President James Doti may well have been a latter-day Jimmy Carter, helping to break the impasse between Walt Disney Co. and the city of Anaheim. Just two weeks before, the company's Disney Sports Enterprises had publicly declared negotiations with city officials dead. Angel owner Jackie Autry was threatening to move the team.
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