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BUSINESS
May 23, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
A high-powered group of business executives, including investor Warren E. Buffett and television producer Norman Lear, announced an organization in Los Angeles on Monday to set standards for corporate behavior and reward "acts of courage, integrity and social vision." The group, calling itself Business Enterprise Trust, plans to conduct research on ethical issues facing corporations and to hand out "Spirit of Enterprise" awards to responsible individuals. James E. Burke, retired chairman and chief executive of Johnson & Johnson and chairman of Business Enterprise Trust, said the organization wasn't formed to dress up corporate America's image in the wake of Wall Street's long-running securities fraud and insider trading scandal.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2012
James E. Burke Johnson & Johnson CEO during Tylenol poisoning James E. Burke, the former Johnson & Johnson chief executive whose leadership during the Tylenol poisoning scare of the 1980s became a model for corporate crisis management, died Friday in New Jersey after a long, unspecified illness, the company announced. He was 87. Burke, who ran the New Brunswick, N.J., company for 13 of his 37 years there, also had a big impact in his second career, as chairman of the Partnership for a Drug-Free America for 16 years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2012
James E. Burke Johnson & Johnson CEO during Tylenol poisoning James E. Burke, the former Johnson & Johnson chief executive whose leadership during the Tylenol poisoning scare of the 1980s became a model for corporate crisis management, died Friday in New Jersey after a long, unspecified illness, the company announced. He was 87. Burke, who ran the New Brunswick, N.J., company for 13 of his 37 years there, also had a big impact in his second career, as chairman of the Partnership for a Drug-Free America for 16 years.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
A high-powered group of business executives, including investor Warren E. Buffett and television producer Norman Lear, announced an organization in Los Angeles on Monday to set standards for corporate behavior and reward "acts of courage, integrity and social vision." The group, calling itself Business Enterprise Trust, plans to conduct research on ethical issues facing corporations and to hand out "Spirit of Enterprise" awards to responsible individuals. James E. Burke, retired chairman and chief executive of Johnson & Johnson and chairman of Business Enterprise Trust, said the organization wasn't formed to dress up corporate America's image in the wake of Wall Street's long-running securities fraud and insider trading scandal.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1989
Johnson & Johnson has installed Ralph S. Larsen as its new chairman and chief executive. Larsen, 50, succeeds James E. Burke, 64, who held the top posts since 1976 and led the world's largest health-care company through the 1982 Tylenol poisoning crisis. The transition at the New Brunswick, N.J., company was previously announced. Burke is retiring but will become chairman of the board's strategic planning committee for one year. Also retiring is David R. Clare, 63, the president and chairman of the executive committee.
NEWS
November 14, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush on Monday enlisted 27 citizens, including a medical pioneer, an admiral and a football coach, to advise him in the battle against drugs. Bush signed an executive order at the White House creating the new Presidential Drug Advisory Council. At a ceremony, Bush recalled that when he announced his anti-drug strategy two months ago: "I asked the question, 'Who's responsible?' Everyone who uses drugs. Everyone who sells drugs. And everyone who looks the other way.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1992 | LINDA GRANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atop General Electric's Rockefeller Center on Thursday, the Palo Alto-based Business Enterprise Trust bestowed five awards on an eclectic collection of business innovators at a ceremony that reflected the touch of its founder, film and television producer Norman Lear.
NEWS
October 8, 1988 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
Child care is coming of age as the hottest single fringe benefit in the nation's largest corporations, top U.S. business executives believe. Members of the Business Council, who include the chief executives of the 100 largest U.S. companies, say they are beginning to focus more seriously on providing child-care benefits because it has become necessary to attract top young talent--both executives and blue-collar workers.
NEWS
March 27, 1993 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
IBM made it official Friday, naming as its chairman Louis V. Gerstner Jr. in the enormous gamble that the first outsider in the company's 79-year history can reverse the steep decline of what was once America's preeminent corporation. Confirming days of speculation, IBM said Gerstner, 51, the head of RJR Nabisco Holdings, will become IBM's chairman and chief executive on April 1. Few managers have accepted a greater challenge.
NEWS
November 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush today named 27 citizens, including medical pioneer Dr. Jonas Salk, former Atty. Gen. William French Smith and ex-Dallas Cowboys Coach Tom Landry, as advisers for the war on drugs. "All share my goal of ridding America of illegal drugs," Bush said at a White House ceremony where he signed an executive order creating the Presidential Drug Advisory Council. With drug policy director William J.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | From Associated Press
IBM ended the speculation Friday by naming Louis V. Gerstner Jr. chairman and chief executive. Now, the man who steered the cigarettes-to-cookies RJR Nabisco empire faces daunting tasks: restoring the power, prestige and profitability of the world's biggest computer company. First, he needs a crash course in the computer industry. Gerstner is just the seventh chairman and the first outsider to lead International Business Machines Corp. in its 79 years.
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