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James E Olson

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BUSINESS
May 17, 1985 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK
NATION As expected, Lawrence G. Rawl, 57, was elected president of Exxon Corp. at the oil company's annual meeting in Los Angeles. Rawl succeeds Howard C. Kauffmann, 62, who retired. Rawl, a senior vice president and director since 1980, is an engineer and is regarded as an expert in exploration and production. He joined Exxon in 1952 and spent 10 years in production and planning before appointments to executive positions in domestic supply and marketing. Kauffmann joined Exxon in 1946 and was named president after a career devoted largely to Exxon's overseas operations.
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BUSINESS
April 19, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL
Sept. 1, 1986--Olson becomes American Telephone & Telegraph chairman. Sept. 18--Asks senior managers to trim their management staffs as part of a "new, hard look" at the company's overall costs, using cash incentives to induce early retirements. November--Completes plans to recast AT&T, an effort calling for the blending of the company's computer operations and telecommunications network services. Dec. 18--Announces the paring of 27,400 jobs over the following year and a $3.
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BUSINESS
April 19, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Robert E. Allen, AT&T's acting chairman and the likely permanent successor to the late James E. Olson, isn't much like the previous head of the nation's eighth-largest company. "In style, they're different as night and day," said Robert B. Morris III, who follows the company for Prudential-Bache Securities. "Mr. Olson was gregarious, forceful and a take-charge individual. Mr. Allen is much more of a methodical, reserved individual."
BUSINESS
April 19, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
In his 17 months as chairman and chief executive of American Telephone & Telegraph, James E. Olson managed to give a seemingly befuddled company a sense of direction while turning the telecommunications giant into a leaner and more aggressive and profitable outfit. Most important, Olson, who died Monday following a brief struggle with cancer, developed a strategy that appears likely to keep AT&T on a successful path for years to come, analysts say.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
In his 17 months as chairman and chief executive of American Telephone & Telegraph, James E. Olson managed to give a seemingly befuddled company a sense of direction while turning the telecommunications giant into a leaner and more aggressive and profitable outfit. Most important, Olson, who died Monday following a brief struggle with cancer, developed a strategy that appears likely to keep AT&T on a successful path for years to come, analysts say.
NEWS
April 18, 1988 | Associated Press
James E. Olson, the forceful chairman of American Telephone & Telegraph Co. who got his start at the age of 17 cleaning silt out of manholes for the Bell System in Grand Forks, N.D., died early today at home of cancer. Olson, who had led the telecommunications giant since the fall of 1986, was 62. AT&T President Robert E. Allen, who took over from Olson after Olson became ill with colon cancer last month, will continue to direct the company until the board of directors elects a new chairman.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL
Sept. 1, 1986--Olson becomes American Telephone & Telegraph chairman. Sept. 18--Asks senior managers to trim their management staffs as part of a "new, hard look" at the company's overall costs, using cash incentives to induce early retirements. November--Completes plans to recast AT&T, an effort calling for the blending of the company's computer operations and telecommunications network services. Dec. 18--Announces the paring of 27,400 jobs over the following year and a $3.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1987
Caltech, Pasadena, named James E. Olson, chairman and CEO of American Telephone & Telegraph Co., to its board of trustees. He became AT&T's vice president and chief operating officer in June, 1985, and assumed his current post last September.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Robert E. Allen, AT&T's acting chairman and the likely permanent successor to the late James E. Olson, isn't much like the previous head of the nation's eighth-largest company. "In style, they're different as night and day," said Robert B. Morris III, who follows the company for Prudential-Bache Securities. "Mr. Olson was gregarious, forceful and a take-charge individual. Mr. Allen is much more of a methodical, reserved individual."
NEWS
April 18, 1988 | Associated Press
James E. Olson, the forceful chairman of American Telephone & Telegraph Co. who got his start at the age of 17 cleaning silt out of manholes for the Bell System in Grand Forks, N.D., died early today at home of cancer. Olson, who had led the telecommunications giant since the fall of 1986, was 62. AT&T President Robert E. Allen, who took over from Olson after Olson became ill with colon cancer last month, will continue to direct the company until the board of directors elects a new chairman.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1985 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK
NATION As expected, Lawrence G. Rawl, 57, was elected president of Exxon Corp. at the oil company's annual meeting in Los Angeles. Rawl succeeds Howard C. Kauffmann, 62, who retired. Rawl, a senior vice president and director since 1980, is an engineer and is regarded as an expert in exploration and production. He joined Exxon in 1952 and spent 10 years in production and planning before appointments to executive positions in domestic supply and marketing. Kauffmann joined Exxon in 1946 and was named president after a career devoted largely to Exxon's overseas operations.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | Associated Press
American Telephone & Telegraph Co.'s board elected President Robert E. Allen as chairman and chief executive officer to succeed James E. Olson, who died from cancer two days ago, the company said today. AT&T also announced today its profit rose 10.6% in the first quarter to $492 million, equaling 46 cents per share, up from $445 million, or 40 cents a share, a year earlier.
REAL ESTATE
January 19, 1986
James E. Olson, president and chief operating officer of New York-based American Telephone & Telegraph Corp., will give the keynote address Wednesday at the Kern County Business Outlook Conference in the Bakersfield Civic Auditorium. More than 2,200 people are expected to attend the annual forecasting session, starting at 9 a.m. and ending after lunch. Sponsored by the Kern County Board of Trade, the conference was sold out months ago at $20 a head.
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