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James E Sabow

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Wednesday threw out a $10-million civil lawsuit filed by the family of a U.S. Marine Corps colonel who died in 1991, ruling that the family had not proved that military brass used intimidation tactics to quash their inquiries into the death investigation. U.S. District Judge Alicemarie H.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Wednesday threw out a $10-million civil lawsuit filed by the family of a U.S. Marine Corps colonel who died in 1991, ruling that the family had not proved that military brass used intimidation tactics to quash their inquiries into the death investigation. U.S. District Judge Alicemarie H.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1994 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the third time, the military has opened an investigation into the apparent suicide of a top officer here in 1991, and investigators took sworn statements this week in Arizona from two people who contend the colonel was murdered. The Marine Corps has long sought to put to rest the death of Col. James E. Sabow, 51, an assistant chief of staff at the base who was found shot to death in his back yard just days after he was suspended for allegedly taking improper flights on base planes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The widow of a high-ranking colonel who the military said killed himself in 1991 testified Wednesday that she believes her husband's death was not a suicide and that top U.S. Marine Corps brass refused to answer questions about the death investigation. Appearing in U.S. District Court in Santa Ana, Sara Sabow, 55, said she was emotionally devastated by the way the military handled the death of her husband, James E. Sabow.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten months ago, David Sabow stood tearfully in the Marine chapel here, a beaten man bent over his older brother's flag-draped coffin. To all who would listen, he vowed: "Justice will come." To David Sabow and other relatives, these were not idle words, uttered in grief and soon forgotten. Instead, the vindication of Col. James E. Sabow has become a life's crusade for the family of the 51-year-old colonel at El Toro Marine Corps Air Station who apparently killed himself with a .
NEWS
December 14, 1991
Eleven months after a Marine Corps colonel reportedly killed himself amid a scandal over use of military planes, the Corps has surprised its critics by reopening the investigation into his death, officials said Friday. The Marine Corps apparently decided to reverse its position because of pressure from James E. Sabow's family, who maintain that the former assistant chief of staff at the Marine Corps Air Station at El Toro may have been murdered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The widow of a high-ranking colonel who the military said killed himself in 1991 testified Wednesday that she believes her husband's death was not a suicide and that top U.S. Marine Corps brass refused to answer questions about the death investigation. Appearing in U.S. District Court in Santa Ana, Sara Sabow, 55, said she was emotionally devastated by the way the military handled the death of her husband, James E. Sabow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a decade-old mystery that didn't rest even after the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station closed its gates last year. The body of a high-ranking colonel is found by his wife shot in the head at their home, just a week into the Persian Gulf War in 1991. After two investigations, the military ruled Col. James E. Sabow's death a suicide. But his family was never convinced. They say the Marines did sloppy investigation and that Sabow was probably murdered.
NEWS
November 3, 1992 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family of a Marine Corps colonel whose death last year caused a scandal at the El Toro air base is filing a claim against the military, alleging that officials conspired to conceal information about the case. Marine Corps officials concluded that Col. James E. Sabow, 51, killed himself with a .12-gauge, double-barreled shotgun on Jan. 22, 1991, because he was upset over his suspension for allegedly using U.S. planes for personal trips.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A senior officer at the Marine Corps Air Station here, targeted in a probe that may have prompted the suicide of his best friend, defended himself Wednesday against allegations of official misconduct and called the investigation involving the two men "a nightmare." In an emotional telephone interview, Col. Joseph E. Underwood said he "would love to give my side of the story" but was prevented from discussing the specifics of the investigation because of military protocol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a decade-old mystery that didn't rest even after the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station closed its gates last year. The body of a high-ranking colonel is found by his wife shot in the head at their home, just a week into the Persian Gulf War in 1991. After two investigations, the military ruled Col. James E. Sabow's death a suicide. But his family was never convinced. They say the Marines did sloppy investigation and that Sabow was probably murdered.
NEWS
September 13, 1996 | From Associated Press
When Col. James Sabow was found dead of a shotgun blast at the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station, the military said it was a simple case of a man killing himself to avoid embarrassment. But his brother, a South Dakota neurosurgeon, says he can prove it was murder--one of dozens of cases where family members allege that sloppy or fraudulent military investigations led to rulings of self-inflicted deaths. "These notions are not the delusions of despondent relatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1996 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court Wednesday handed a partial legal victory to a family fighting to prove that a former base commander at El Toro Marine Corps Air Station covered up evidence that a decorated Marine colonel was murdered in 1991. In a decision that criticized the military's investigation as "unprofessional," the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled 3-0 to reinstate a portion of a lawsuit filed by the family of Col. James E. Sabow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1994 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the third time, the military has opened an investigation into the apparent suicide of a top officer here in 1991, and investigators took sworn statements this week in Arizona from two people who contend the colonel was murdered. The Marine Corps has long sought to put to rest the death of Col. James E. Sabow, 51, an assistant chief of staff at the base who was found shot to death in his back yard just days after he was suspended for allegedly taking improper flights on base planes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1993 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family of a top Marine who died in a now-disputed suicide is charging that the military botched its investigation into the colonel's 1991 death and may have doctored photographs of the scene. Col. James E. Sabow's survivors filed a $60-million claim against the military last November, nearly two years after Sabow's death touched off a scandal over the use of government airplanes that led to the dismissal of the commanding general at the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station.
NEWS
February 9, 1993 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family of a top Marine who apparently killed himself is making new charges that the military botched its investigation into the colonel's controversial 1991 death and may have doctored photographs at the death scene. Col. James E. Sabow's survivors filed a $60-million claim against the military last November, nearly two years after Sabow's death during a scandal over the use of government planes that led to the dismissal of the commanding general at the Marine Corps Air Station at El Toro.
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An investigation into two high-ranking officials at the Marine air base here has focused almost exclusively on their questionable use of military aircraft, a defense attorney said Thursday, prompting surprise among some service personnel that this would be enough to drive one of the officers to suicide. Military sources stressed, however, that the number of flights taken by Marine Cols. Joseph E. Underwood and the late James E.
NEWS
February 9, 1993 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family of a top Marine who apparently killed himself is making new charges that the military botched its investigation into the colonel's controversial 1991 death and may have doctored photographs at the death scene. Col. James E. Sabow's survivors filed a $60-million claim against the military last November, nearly two years after Sabow's death during a scandal over the use of government planes that led to the dismissal of the commanding general at the Marine Corps Air Station at El Toro.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1992 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family of a Marine Corps colonel whose death last year caused a scandal at the base here is filing a claim against the military, alleging that officials conspired to conceal information about the case. Marine Corps officials concluded that Col. James E. Sabow, 51, killed himself with a .12-gauge, double-barreled shotgun on Jan. 22, 1991, because he was upset over his suspension for allegedly using U.S. aircraft for personal trips.
NEWS
November 3, 1992 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family of a Marine Corps colonel whose death last year caused a scandal at the El Toro air base is filing a claim against the military, alleging that officials conspired to conceal information about the case. Marine Corps officials concluded that Col. James E. Sabow, 51, killed himself with a .12-gauge, double-barreled shotgun on Jan. 22, 1991, because he was upset over his suspension for allegedly using U.S. planes for personal trips.
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