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James E Webb

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March 29, 1992 | From the Washington Post
James E. Webb, the hard-charging and immensely capable administrator who was head of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration from 1961 to 1968, has died at 85. Webb died Thursday at Georgetown University Hospital after a heart attack. He had also suffered from Parkinson's disease. Webb had a long career in public service and private industry. During the Truman Administration, he served as director of the Budget Bureau and as an undersecretary of state.
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NEWS
March 29, 1992 | From the Washington Post
James E. Webb, the hard-charging and immensely capable administrator who was head of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration from 1961 to 1968, has died at 85. Webb died Thursday at Georgetown University Hospital after a heart attack. He had also suffered from Parkinson's disease. Webb had a long career in public service and private industry. During the Truman Administration, he served as director of the Budget Bureau and as an undersecretary of state.
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NEWS
May 6, 1992 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thomas O. Paine, the former NASA administrator who was at the cutting edge of the Apollo moon landing programs and whose expertise was used to define American space goals into the next century, died of cancer Monday at his Los Angeles home. Paine, who also had been president and chief operating officer of Northrop Corp., was 70. Paine was named deputy administrator and then administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration by President Lyndon B. Johnson.
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW and JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writers
Defense consultant Melvyn R. Paisley, a central figure in the growing investigation of fraud and bribery in the nation's weapons procurement system, allegedly arranged an elaborate scheme under which high-level Pentagon officials smuggled classified documents out of the Pentagon and allowed him to copy them with the aid of his wife, government sources said Wednesday. Paisley allegedly passed the sensitive information along to his major client, McDonnell Douglas Corp.
NEWS
July 27, 2003 | Kyle Wingfield, Associated Press Writer
The mission: to build a telescope mirror capable of detecting the first light of the universe that burst forth about 11 billion years ago but is invisible to human eyes. And, while you're at it, make the mirror capable of soaring almost a million miles from Earth, but sturdy enough that it bends less than the width of a human hair. Sound like science fiction?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1999 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arthur E. Raymond, the Douglas Aircraft engineer who helped revolutionize commercial air travel as the principal designer of the DC-3, died Monday at St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica. He was 99 and lived in Bel-Air. The DC-3 was the country's first reliable passenger plane, known as the workhorse of aviation for its indestructibility. More than 50 years later, as many as 2,000 of the original 11,000 planes are still in use around the world.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2002 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
TRW Inc. was selected by NASA on Tuesday to build a new space telescope, a high-profile scientific project that represents an endorsement of Southern California's leadership in the space industry. The new observatory--to be 10 times more powerful than the existing Hubble Space Telescope it will replace--will allow astronomers to peer deeper into the cosmos than ever before. Scientists hope to use the capability to understand what happened after the big bang that created the universe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2007 | Eric Malnic, Special to The Times
Walter M. "Wally" Schirra Jr., who followed his barnstorming parents into the sky as a Navy combat pilot and was the only astronaut to fly in the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo space programs, has died. He was 84. Schirra, who had been battling cancer, died early Thursday in La Jolla, according to Paul Parker, an investigator with the San Diego County medical examiner.
NEWS
November 26, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
It took more than 40 years to build the Washington Memorial obelisk, the marble spire that symbolizes the capital city, but in the last few years monuments and plans for monuments threaten to create a new version of the petrified forest on the banks of the Potomac. The recent building fever has produced Constitution Gardens, containing stones honoring the signers of the Declaration of Independence, completed in 1984 to commemorate the U.S.
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | TAYLOR BRANCH
In autumn, 1960, the Rev. Martin Luther King joined a student campaign to desegregate snack bars and restaurants in Atlanta's department stores. Out of the demonstrations would come an event that would forever alter the political fortunes of John F. Kennedy, the Democratic Party's presidential candidate. Eighty demonstrators, their watches synchronized, requested service in eight different segregated Atlanta establishments at precisely 11 o'clock on Wednesday, Oct. 19, 1960.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1985 | DEBRA WHITEFIELD, Times Staff Writer
It wasn't long after the lecture from his boss about spending more time watching people than reading books that Peter Drucker fell in with the Dutch businessman and his four wives. The man was an important client of Drucker's employer, an English banker, and was in need of a house in the English countryside. Find me one with several wings, he implored the startled Drucker, his escort, one for each wife and room for the future. Drucker had seen these women and was bewildered.
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