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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1991 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pair of Los Angeles police officers, accused in the assault of a Salvadoran immigrant last March, have been exonerated by their superiors, who now believe the policemen were caught up in a public outcry against the LAPD triggered by the beating of Rodney King. Officers James E.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1991 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pair of Los Angeles police officers, accused in the assault of a Salvadoran immigrant last March, have been exonerated by their superiors, who now believe the policemen were caught up in a public outcry against the LAPD triggered by the beating of Rodney King. Officers James E.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2001 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Littlerock High School football star was sentenced to one year in jail for assault, but authorities dropped a more serious murder charge Friday. Rodney Woods, 18, of Palmdale, was also given five years probation. He has served 155 days in a juvenile facility, and could be freed from custody within two months with credit for good behavior, said his attorney, James E. Blatt. Woods is a former running back who holds a full football scholarship to Cal State Fresno.
NEWS
November 24, 1990 | MICHAEL WEISSKOPF, THE WASHINGTON POST
Can a scientist who is trying to land a $1.2-million grant from Philip Morris be counted on to objectively assess the risks of passive smoking? If the answer is no, consider that the same scientist serves as an adviser to the American Lung Assn. That may sound like a pop quiz for law students, but such questions formed a real life puzzle for Environmental Protection Agency officials in search of outside scientists to evaluate an agency draft report on the risk of passive smoking.
NEWS
October 19, 2001 | ALAN C. MILLER and AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Even a terrorist who is able to expose people to anthrax through the mail would still face a number of difficulties launching a broader attack, according to experts in biological warfare. Widely dispersing the bacteria would require considerably larger quantities of virulent, uniformly tiny and highly sophisticated forms of anthrax, a way to disseminate them effectively and favorable meteorological conditions.
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