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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1999
Allow me to refute Earl Ofari Hutchinson's "irrefutable" evidence that James Earl Ray killed Martin Luther King Jr. (Commentary, Dec. 10). It's true that his fingerprints were found on the alleged murder weapon, and that Ray confessed. However, he confessed after being locked up in solitary confinement, forbidden from talking to his lawyer, for about a month. Once released, he immediately recanted. The courts didn't accept his reversal, so nobody bothered to perform ballistic tests on the alleged weapon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2010 | By Art Winslow, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Hellhound on His Trail The Stalking of Martin Luther King Jr. and the International Hunt for His Assassin Hampton Sides Doubleday: 480 pp., $28.95 Told that his activities were "unwise and untimely," the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. responded, in his famous 1963 "Letter From Birmingham Jail," that while he was committed to nonviolence, "I am in Birmingham because injustice is here." Five years later, he was in Memphis, Tenn., for similar reasons — to demonstrate in support of 1,300 city sanitation workers who were on strike — when he was gunned down on a motel balcony, waiting to go to dinner.
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NEWS
January 7, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
James Earl Ray returned to the same hospital where he was treated for liver disease over the holidays. Ray, 68, was in fair condition at Columbia Nashville Memorial Hospital, said hospital spokeswoman Freda Herndon. She refused to elaborate. Ray is serving a 99-year sentence for the assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis in 1968. Ray confessed to the killing, but later recanted. He has professed his innocence ever since.
TRAVEL
April 27, 2008
Susan Spano's April 20 article "In Pursuit of Butch and Sundance" was magnificent. One inflexible rule of journalese is that American assassins must have three names: John Wilkes Booth, Lee Harvey Oswald, James Earl Ray, Mark David Chapman. This courtesy of a resonant three-part moniker is also applied to other dangerous folk. This is why the "Utah bandit" is "Robert LeRoy Parker" to many journalists and just plain "Butch Cassidy" to almost everyone else. Evan Dale Santos Adelanto, Calif.
NEWS
March 5, 1993 | Associated Press
James Earl Ray, who is serving a 99-year prison sentence for the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., has been granted a divorce from his wife of 14 years. "This marriage probably was doomed from the beginning," Probate Judge Jim Everett said Wednesday. Anna Sandhu Ray said that, at the time they married, Ray told her his release from prison was imminent because he had new evidence to prove his innocence. King was killed in Memphis, Tenn., on April 4, 1968.
NEWS
January 11, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
James Earl Ray, imprisoned for assassinating the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., needs a liver transplant, his lawyer said, and a search is on for a donor to circumvent the normal transplant process. Ray, 68, who is serving a 99-year sentence, has been hospitalized twice recently with chronic liver disease. He has been back in a state prison hospital since Jan. 3. His lawyer, William Pepper, said Ray will die within months without a transplant.
NEWS
March 14, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
James Earl Ray, the convicted assassin of Martin Luther King Jr., regained consciousness from a coma, a prison spokeswoman said. He remains in critical condition, she said. Ray, 70, suffers from cirrhosis of the liver and has been in and out of the hospital nearly a dozen times since December 1996. He underwent hernia surgery last month and was returned to prison 12 days later. He is serving a 99-year prison sentence for King's 1968 murder in Memphis.
NEWS
February 14, 1997 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dexter King was 7 years old in 1968 when his father was killed by a sniper's bullet. And for most of his life, he said Thursday, he has suspected that the truth about the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s murder had never been told. Although the family has kept silent, its members have believed for 29 years that there was a conspiracy to kill King, and that forces of the government likely were involved, he said.
NEWS
January 1, 1998 | Associated Press
Tennessee has denied James Earl Ray's request to move in with his brother so he won't die behind bars, authorities said. The convicted killer of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. has terminal liver disease. Ray asked in October for a medical furlough, granted to inmates who are in "imminent danger of death." His request was denied Dec. 5, a prison spokeswoman said. She cited "security reasons and concerns" for the denial, but she declined to elaborate or say whether Ray is in immediate danger of dying.
NEWS
December 27, 1996 | From Associated Press
James Earl Ray, the convicted killer of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., came out of a coma Thursday and was laughing and talking in his hospital bed, his brother said. "He looked 100% better," Jerry Ray said after leaving the hospital. "He's talking and everything." Ray, 68, who suffers from liver and kidney damage and had been in a coma for days, was upgraded from critical to serious condition at Columbia Nashville Memorial Hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Harold "Hal" Light, 86, a retired FBI special agent who oversaw construction of the FBI Academy at Quantico, Va., died Dec. 18 of complications from cancer surgery and a stroke at a hospital in Newark, Del. Light was the agent picked by FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover in 1968 to manage the extradition of James Earl Ray to the United States from London, where he had been arrested in the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. On his trip...
NATIONAL
March 31, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The flophouse bathtub James Earl Ray stood in to fatally shoot Martin Luther King Jr. has been sold on EBay to an online casino for $7,600, the tub's owner said. The Golden Palace Casino had the winning bid, said D'Army Bailey, a Memphis judge, who owned the tub. Bailey said he'd been assured the casino would treat the tub "with sensitivity for its historical significance." Golden Palace has bought numerous historical or noteworthy artifacts for a traveling display.
NEWS
January 17, 2002 | Reuters
A plaque intended to honor black actor James Earl Jones at a Florida celebration of the life of Martin Luther King Jr. instead paid tribute to James Earl Ray, the man who killed the black civil rights leader, officials said Wednesday. The plaque's designer made the error, said Gerald Wilcox, owner of Lauderhill-based Adpro, which ordered the plaque. It was being corrected for Jones' visit to the Fort Lauderdale suburb Saturday. "We were very upset," said Wilcox.
NEWS
June 10, 2000 | From Associated Press
After 18 months, a Justice Department investigation rejected allegations that conspirators aided or framed James Earl Ray in the 1968 assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. It recommended against further investigation.
NEWS
March 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge in Nashville said the rifle believed used by James Earl Ray to assassinate civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. ought to be sent to a Memphis museum when the government is finished examining it. Davidson County Circuit Court Judge Frank Clement ruled previously that the rifle belongs to the state of Tennessee and not to Ray's brother, Jerry, who claims the rifle was not the murder weapon and that it belongs to him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1999
Allow me to refute Earl Ofari Hutchinson's "irrefutable" evidence that James Earl Ray killed Martin Luther King Jr. (Commentary, Dec. 10). It's true that his fingerprints were found on the alleged murder weapon, and that Ray confessed. However, he confessed after being locked up in solitary confinement, forbidden from talking to his lawyer, for about a month. Once released, he immediately recanted. The courts didn't accept his reversal, so nobody bothered to perform ballistic tests on the alleged weapon.
NEWS
January 27, 1997 | From Associated Press
James Earl Ray, the jailed assassin of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., was hospitalized again over the weekend with chronic liver disease. Ray was taken to Nashville Memorial Hospital late Saturday in critical condition. His condition was upgraded to serious Sunday evening, hospital spokeswoman Freda Herndon said. Ray's lawyer, William Pepper, said earlier this month that Ray would die within months unless he gets a liver transplant.
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | From Associated Press
An ailing James Earl Ray, in prison for the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., was denied permission Monday to go to Pennsylvania to see whether he can get a liver transplant. Irvin Kilcrease, a Chancery Court judge, said Ray's lawyers failed to give a legal reason why the 69-year-old inmate should be moved to the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. William Pepper, Ray's chief lawyer, said he will appeal in days.
NEWS
December 9, 1999 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than three decades after the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, a Memphis jury hearing a lawsuit brought by his wife and children found Wednesday that King was the victim not of a lone racist gunman but of a vast conspiracy. The jury awarded the King family, which sought only a token sum, $100 in its wrongful death suit against Loyd Jowers, the ailing former owner of a Memphis restaurant who six years ago claimed that he hired King's assassin as a favor to a Mafia friend.
NEWS
October 3, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Martin Luther King Jr.'s family filed a suit in another attempt to get a Tennessee court to hear its claim that the civil rights leader's assassination was a conspiracy. The suit accuses former Memphis restaurant owner Lloyd Jowers and "unknown co-conspirators" of being involved in King's murder. The suit seeks unspecified damages and a jury trial.
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