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James Earl Reid

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NEWS
June 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court, in a victory for artists and authors, ruled Monday that a homeless-rights group is not the exclusive owner of the copyright to a sculpture it commissioned an artist to create. The 9-0 decision (CCNV vs. Reid, 88-293) ordered further lower court hearings to determine whether the Community for Creative Non-Violence and its founder, Mitch Snyder, may share in the copyright of a work entitled "Third World America," which depicts the plight of the homeless. Justice Thurgood Marshall, writing for the court, said the sculpture is a "work made for hire" and, therefore, its creator, James Earl Reid of Baltimore, must at least share in the copyright.
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NEWS
June 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court, in a victory for artists and authors, ruled Monday that a homeless-rights group is not the exclusive owner of the copyright to a sculpture it commissioned an artist to create. The 9-0 decision (CCNV vs. Reid, 88-293) ordered further lower court hearings to determine whether the Community for Creative Non-Violence and its founder, Mitch Snyder, may share in the copyright of a work entitled "Third World America," which depicts the plight of the homeless. Justice Thurgood Marshall, writing for the court, said the sculpture is a "work made for hire" and, therefore, its creator, James Earl Reid of Baltimore, must at least share in the copyright.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1989 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Who owns the copyright to an artwork--the artist who created it or the group that commissioned it? The question will be answered in an upcoming U.S. Supreme Court case that could be a bonanza for free-lance creators and a disaster for business. Community for Creative Nonviolence vs. Reid may sound like a street fight between an advocacy group for the homeless and a sculptor from Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1989 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Who owns the copyright to an artwork--the artist who created it or the group that commissioned it? The question will be answered in an upcoming U.S. Supreme Court case that could be a bonanza for free-lance creators and a disaster for business. Community for Creative Nonviolence vs. Reid may sound like a street fight between an advocacy group for the homeless and a sculptor from Baltimore.
NEWS
November 26, 1985 | Associated Press
A statue decribed as a "modern Nativity scene" that depicts a homeless family huddled on a steam grate has been rejected by the National Park Service for display in the annual Pageant of Peace on the Ellipse. The pageant committee considered the scene inappropriate for the annual display at the foot of the national Christmas tree behind the White House, Park Service spokeswoman Sandra Alley said today.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1989 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Supreme Court order this week for lower court hearings to determine whether artist James Earl Reid must share the copyright to an artwork with the homeless-rights agency that commissioned it is likely to end in a settlement instead of trial, Reid's attorney Joshua Kaufman said Tuesday. "My client doesn't have the wherewithal for another trial and the Community for Creative Non-Violence doesn't have an interest in the legal issues, so I'm hoping to settle the case," the Washington attorney said.
NEWS
June 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court today dealt a blow to minorities who say they are victims of on-the-job discrimination, making it easier for employers to refute claims of racial bias based on statistical evidence. By a 5-4 vote, the justices overturned a ruling that favored Filipinos, Alaska natives and Asians employed at Alaska salmon canneries. The justices ordered further lower court hearings in the case. In a sharply worded dissent, Justice John Paul Stevens said the ruling "retreats" from 18 years of court decisions aimed at helping minorities who are victimized by discrimination that may be unintentional.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1989 | CHARLES THIESEN and BARBARA BECKWITH, Charles Thiesen is chairman and Barbara Beckwith is administrative director of the Boston local of the National Writers Union. and
The recent merger of Time Inc. and Warner Communications is part of an alarming trend, the escalating conglomeration of the media. Time baldly predicted this year in its annual report that "by the mid-1990s, the media-entertainment industry will consist of a handful of vertically integrated worldwide giants. Time Inc. (now Time/Warner) will be one of them. Recent history and the Time/Warner merger support the prediction. Ten years ago, 50 firms controlled half the U.S. media.
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